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Don't know if I've picked the wrong path in life watch

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    Sorry this post is a bit long. Hope this is in the right place. If you'd rather just look at the summary go to the confused smiley :confused:

    I graduated from university many years ago. When studying at uni I got a good grade overall and loved my courses (I did a degree and a masters). I loved reading around the subject and could never understand those students wouldn't just studied to get a job and not for the love of the subject. After graduating I never found part or full time work as I couldn't pass interviews. I only found temp jobs (most of which I hated apart from teaching English online which I loved but the company was really unreliable) or did self employed work.

    I did a few courses (some of which I passed some of which I didn't) but no work ever came from doing the courses. I also investigated what lay behind my problem with interviews and was told it was due to problems with eye contact (some professionals think its dyspraxia, while others have suggested its high autistic trait and some think both). It was hard at first maintaining eye contact and I don't always do too well but since working on it I've noticing a dramatic improvement in my interaction with people. I think I might even do better at interviews but fear that my rather erratic CV will prohibit me obtaining any and even if I do people will be suspicious that I've job hopped (mix of temp, voluntary and self employed). As I feared people's reaction to my cv I decided to go back to uni to come out as a fresh graduate and go into a field which almost guaranteed that I got work as its not popular. It involves working with people and I thought I'd fail the placement aspect but to my surprise I am actually struggling with the course (its not what I thought it would be). I love the placement however (because I get to help people and I really like meeting new people).

    I thought the course would land me more reliable and better paid work and possibly better paid self employed work. The first year of the course was nothing like I thought it would be (its in a medical field again so I thought I'd love it as much as my other course-I just don't feel the same way about it). In the second year I went to a conference in my chosen field and really loved it. However the first semester of the second year was a bit of a disaster: I struggled to stay awake for two out of the three modules I studied (I was yawning my way through the day-it could be because I found one module too easy and one too hard, although it could be that I've had a lot of stress recently as I've had to deal with illness in the family. I also failed the module I found too hard. I didn't do much of the reading for the module I found difficult because I'd start falling asleep after reading a few pages of the core text.

    From what I've experienced I have a few plus and minus points in terms of sticking with the course. :confused:

    Should I carry on with a course if I am not enthused by the material. As I loved the conference its possible I might love the job after. Having said that if the course is making me fall asleep a lot then this is probably not a good sign. This brings me to another question: Is following your passion the best path, as there is a lot to be said for doing a job you feel is useful.

    The hard module that I failed is a core part of the course, I can't do the job well if I don't understand this module. Also I could stay on and end up failing the module in the summer and have to leave anyway. I am thinking this could go two ways I could be the case that I will never be able to grasp the material (it could just be too abstract for me) or maybe if its taught differently it will all click into place. Also afraid if I just about pass this aspect of the course that when I graduate I will struggle with the job.

    If I leave the course will I get a job with my erratic cv.

    I am actually feeling quite depressed on the course (even before I failed the module). But I am unsure if this is to do with family issues or the course itself. Now I am on placement I am quite enjoying myself. However the family issues aren't that bad at the moment so this might be behind the improvement in my mood.

    Even though I am halfway through it wouldn't be a waste to give up because I can transfer credits and the first year gives me the experience and qualifications to do a support role (which involves helping people and meeting new people-although it is paid a lot less).

    Do you study a subject just to get a job at the end of it or do you love what you do?
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    (Original post by neurograd)
    Sorry this post is a bit long. Hope this is in the right place. If you'd rather just look at the summary go to the confused smiley :confused:

    I graduated from university many years ago. When studying at uni I got a good grade overall and loved my courses (I did a degree and a masters). I loved reading around the subject and could never understand those students wouldn't just studied to get a job and not for the love of the subject. After graduating I never found part or full time work as I couldn't pass interviews. I only found temp jobs (most of which I hated apart from teaching English online which I loved but the company was really unreliable) or did self employed work.

    I did a few courses (some of which I passed some of which I didn't) but no work ever came from doing the courses. I also investigated what lay behind my problem with interviews and was told it was due to problems with eye contact (some professionals think its dyspraxia, while others have suggested its high autistic trait and some think both). It was hard at first maintaining eye contact and I don't always do too well but since working on it I've noticing a dramatic improvement in my interaction with people. I think I might even do better at interviews but fear that my rather erratic CV will prohibit me obtaining any and even if I do people will be suspicious that I've job hopped (mix of temp, voluntary and self employed). As I feared people's reaction to my cv I decided to go back to uni to come out as a fresh graduate and go into a field which almost guaranteed that I got work as its not popular. It involves working with people and I thought I'd fail the placement aspect but to my surprise I am actually struggling with the course (its not what I thought it would be). I love the placement however (because I get to help people and I really like meeting new people).

    I thought the course would land me more reliable and better paid work and possibly better paid self employed work. The first year of the course was nothing like I thought it would be (its in a medical field again so I thought I'd love it as much as my other course-I just don't feel the same way about it). In the second year I went to a conference in my chosen field and really loved it. However the first semester of the second year was a bit of a disaster: I struggled to stay awake for two out of the three modules I studied (I was yawning my way through the day-it could be because I found one module too easy and one too hard, although it could be that I've had a lot of stress recently as I've had to deal with illness in the family. I also failed the module I found too hard. I didn't do much of the reading for the module I found difficult because I'd start falling asleep after reading a few pages of the core text.

    From what I've experienced I have a few plus and minus points in terms of sticking with the course. :confused:

    Should I carry on with a course if I am not enthused by the material. As I loved the conference its possible I might love the job after. Having said that if the course is making me fall asleep a lot then this is probably not a good sign. This brings me to another question: Is following your passion the best path, as there is a lot to be said for doing a job you feel is useful.

    The hard module that I failed is a core part of the course, I can't do the job well if I don't understand this module. Also I could stay on and end up failing the module in the summer and have to leave anyway. I am thinking this could go two ways I could be the case that I will never be able to grasp the material (it could just be too abstract for me) or maybe if its taught differently it will all click into place. Also afraid if I just about pass this aspect of the course that when I graduate I will struggle with the job.

    If I leave the course will I get a job with my erratic cv.

    I am actually feeling quite depressed on the course (even before I failed the module). But I am unsure if this is to do with family issues or the course itself. Now I am on placement I am quite enjoying myself. However the family issues aren't that bad at the moment so this might be behind the improvement in my mood.

    Even though I am halfway through it wouldn't be a waste to give up because I can transfer credits and the first year gives me the experience and qualifications to do a support role (which involves helping people and meeting new people-although it is paid a lot less).

    Do you study a subject just to get a job at the end of it or do you love what you do?
    What was your first degree in and what kind of work did you ideally want to get into with your first degree? Like what would be your dream job?
    Also what is the degree you're doing now?
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    (Original post by neurograd)
    Sorry this post is a bit long. Hope this is in the right place. If you'd rather just look at the summary go to the confused smiley :confused:

    I graduated from university many years ago. When studying at uni I got a good grade overall and loved my courses (I did a degree and a masters). I loved reading around the subject and could never understand those students wouldn't just studied to get a job and not for the love of the subject. After graduating I never found part or full time work as I couldn't pass interviews. I only found temp jobs (most of which I hated apart from teaching English online which I loved but the company was really unreliable) or did self employed work.

    I did a few courses (some of which I passed some of which I didn't) but no work ever came from doing the courses. I also investigated what lay behind my problem with interviews and was told it was due to problems with eye contact (some professionals think its dyspraxia, while others have suggested its high autistic trait and some think both). It was hard at first maintaining eye contact and I don't always do too well but since working on it I've noticing a dramatic improvement in my interaction with people. I think I might even do better at interviews but fear that my rather erratic CV will prohibit me obtaining any and even if I do people will be suspicious that I've job hopped (mix of temp, voluntary and self employed). As I feared people's reaction to my cv I decided to go back to uni to come out as a fresh graduate and go into a field which almost guaranteed that I got work as its not popular. It involves working with people and I thought I'd fail the placement aspect but to my surprise I am actually struggling with the course (its not what I thought it would be). I love the placement however (because I get to help people and I really like meeting new people).

    I thought the course would land me more reliable and better paid work and possibly better paid self employed work. The first year of the course was nothing like I thought it would be (its in a medical field again so I thought I'd love it as much as my other course-I just don't feel the same way about it). In the second year I went to a conference in my chosen field and really loved it. However the first semester of the second year was a bit of a disaster: I struggled to stay awake for two out of the three modules I studied (I was yawning my way through the day-it could be because I found one module too easy and one too hard, although it could be that I've had a lot of stress recently as I've had to deal with illness in the family. I also failed the module I found too hard. I didn't do much of the reading for the module I found difficult because I'd start falling asleep after reading a few pages of the core text.

    From what I've experienced I have a few plus and minus points in terms of sticking with the course. :confused:

    Should I carry on with a course if I am not enthused by the material. As I loved the conference its possible I might love the job after. Having said that if the course is making me fall asleep a lot then this is probably not a good sign. This brings me to another question: Is following your passion the best path, as there is a lot to be said for doing a job you feel is useful.

    The hard module that I failed is a core part of the course, I can't do the job well if I don't understand this module. Also I could stay on and end up failing the module in the summer and have to leave anyway. I am thinking this could go two ways I could be the case that I will never be able to grasp the material (it could just be too abstract for me) or maybe if its taught differently it will all click into place. Also afraid if I just about pass this aspect of the course that when I graduate I will struggle with the job.

    If I leave the course will I get a job with my erratic cv.

    I am actually feeling quite depressed on the course (even before I failed the module). But I am unsure if this is to do with family issues or the course itself. Now I am on placement I am quite enjoying myself. However the family issues aren't that bad at the moment so this might be behind the improvement in my mood.

    Even though I am halfway through it wouldn't be a waste to give up because I can transfer credits and the first year gives me the experience and qualifications to do a support role (which involves helping people and meeting new people-although it is paid a lot less).

    Do you study a subject just to get a job at the end of it or do you love what you do?
    I personally think you should see out your degree because you are enjoying the placement, which is essentially what you'd be doing as a career. You have a year/year and a half max left, but what you do as a career will be for at least 30+ years of your life, so that should be the main consideration in my opinion.
    And I study to get a job that I enjoy first and foremost, but I also love what I do.
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    In reply to 'The Waffle'. I've done Biomedical science but I was good at the theory but useless at the lab work aspect (however there might be lab work that is less technical and that I can do. I really struggled with things like genetics as its very small scale and I could never process the samples properly). I then did neuroscience and wanted work in academia doing neuroimaging. I did voluntary work in two different places for this. In the first place my work was publishable but my supervisor disappeared bc the department was in trouble. When she re appeared it was too late to publish. In the second place was in complete chaos and I couldn't work properly (my supervisor shut himself in his room and played loud music and would burst into tears-he was having problems with money and at one point was living in a mobile home). I stayed at the second place for a year there was trouble in the first few months and I really should have left. At the moment I am studying podiatry.

    In reply to 'Mr.Econometrics' I am still weighing up whether to stay or go I am going to talk to the uni careers people. Part of me doesn't want to go because it means quitting and part of me thinks that if I stay on I might end up enjoying it more and doing well. But another part of me wonders if I'll ever understand the difficult module. Coupled to that is the fact that the coming semester has a module on research methods. For the research methods modules we get into groups and people want to get good grades so they've been asking around to see if people have got good grades and passed all the modules. As I've failed a module there will be a lot of people who probably won't want me in their group. Also as we stay in the same group for the third year this means that if I fail at retake my group won't have me. I also worry that if I don't understand all of what I am studying I won't be a competent practitioner.
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    Decided to stay on course as if I fail this year I can still enter the NHS at a higher level as a podiatry assistant.
 
 
 
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