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    Free will or determinism? which argument do you support?

    (free will being that you choose your own pathway in life - and you can do anything you want if you set your mind to it)

    (determinism being that everything is determined by your parents, background etc and no matter what you do you cannot shape your future in any way)
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    (Original post by Tinykates)
    Free will or determinism? which argument do you support?

    (free will being that you choose your own pathway in life - and you can do anything you want if you set your mind to it)

    (determinism being that everything is determined by your parents, background etc and no matter what you do you cannot shape your future in any way)
    you're confusing determinism and fatalism a bit.
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    (Original post by Tinykates)
    Free will or determinism? which argument do you support?

    (free will being that you choose your own pathway in life - and you can do anything you want if you set your mind to it)

    (determinism being that everything is determined by your parents, background etc and no matter what you do you cannot shape your future in any way)
    Is this more psychology/sociology homework?
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    Free will personally.
    I prefer the humanistic perspective, so naturally that would be my choice.
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    surely these are the same things from a different angle? you get to the end of your life and how things happen was how things happened fullstop, right?
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    (Original post by theaman)
    Is this more psychology/sociology homework?
    it's from psychology, but i'm really interested in what people think and why
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    Free will.
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    (Original post by Tinykates)
    Free will or determinism? which argument do you support?

    (free will being that you choose your own pathway in life - and you can do anything you want if you set your mind to it)

    (determinism being that everything is determined by your parents, background etc and no matter what you do you cannot shape your future in any way)
    Proper definition of determinism;

    Determinism Belief that, since each momentary state of the world entails all of its future states, it must be possible (in principle) to offer a causal explanation for everything that happens. When applied to human behavior, determinism is sometimes supposed to be incompatible with the freedom required for moral responsibility. The most extreme variety of determinism in this context is fatalism.
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    (Original post by ]{ingnik)
    surely these are the same things from a different angle? you get to the end of your life and how things happen was how things happened fullstop, right?
    what? :confused: yeh...but what's that got to do with the price of fish? this is about HOW you get there
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    (Original post by corey)
    Proper definition of determinism;

    Determinism Belief that, since each momentary state of the world entails all of its future states, it must be possible (in principle) to offer a causal explanation for everything that happens. When applied to human behavior, determinism is sometimes supposed to be incompatible with the freedom required for moral responsibility. The most extreme variety of determinism in this context is fatalism.
    oi. there was nowt wrong wiv me definition!
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    (Original post by Tinykates)
    oi. there was nowt wrong wiv me definition!
    Well, I didn't expect a psycologist to have a proper definition of determinism

    Anyway, surely this is much more a philosophy debate than psycology!!
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    (Original post by Tinykates)
    what? :confused: yeh...but what's that got to do with the price of fish? this is about HOW you get there
    well then its free will. whats the point of determining things? ultimately, who gives a sh*t, what difference does it make?
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    (Original post by corey)
    Well, I didn't expect a psycologist to have a proper definition of determinism

    Anyway, surely this is much more a philosophy debate than psycology!!
    yeah...but it's SYNOPTIC cause it deals with lots of psychological issues...the psychodynamic vs biolgical vs behaviourist vs humanistic approaches. i wanted to do philosophy, but i was the only one in my year who did so they didn't run the course
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    (Original post by Tinykates)
    yeah...but it's SYNOPTIC cause it deals with lots of psychological issues...the psychodynamic vs biolgical vs behaviourist vs humanistic approaches. i wanted to do philosophy, but i was the only one in my year who did so they didn't run the course
    Thats a very harsh question for psycology :/

    Well, my basic stance would be that how could we apply the issue of 'cause and effect' (determinism) to a mind, which for me must surely be something that is non-physical (how could matter have 'beliefs' or 'thoughts').
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    (Original post by corey)
    Thats a very harsh question for psycology :/

    Well, my basic stance would be that how could we apply the issue of 'cause and effect' (determinism) to a mind, which for me must surely be something that is non-physical (how could matter have 'beliefs' or 'thoughts').
    matter does not have belief or thoughts, it is the connection of matter that creates an outcome that we have hence labelled belief or thoughts.
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    (Original post by ]{ingnik)
    matter does not have belief or thoughts, it is the connection of matter that creates an outcome that we have hence labelled belief or thoughts.
    a) Matter does not have belief or thoughts
    b) Matter combined with matter gives an outcome of beliefs/thoughts

    I see a problem in that logic.
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    How can everything be predetermined?

    My parents had 4 kids which are all completely different, one's a dim-witted self-harming drug-addict townie who will drop out of school when she's failed her gcse's and another is going to university. If parents and background shape your future how can two people who share the same upbringing be so different?
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    (Original post by corey)
    a) Matter does not have belief or thoughts
    b) Matter combined with matter gives an outcome of beliefs/thoughts

    I see a problem in that logic.
    no, matter combined with matter doesnt equate to thought. matter connecting with other matter by way of impulse creates thought
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    (Original post by ]{ingnik)
    no, matter combined with matter doesnt equate to thought. matter connecting with other matter by way of impulse creates thought
    So, the physical creates the non-physical?
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    to all those who chose pure free will...what about someone who is disabled and wants to run the 100 metres for their country?
 
 
 
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