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    Brothers

    I have a hardcore job 60 hours a week as an accountant. Brain drain work.

    Plus I want to do a masters in Law LLM . It is weekend studies.

    Can it be done?

    I can see for a shop-worker working 20 hours a week or even 30 hour a week plus doing p/t masters is not too bad.

    Or an engineer working 40 hour a week plus masters in a related area of engineering

    But for me? i am doing a brain draining job, or very many hours, plus a TOUGH masters

    i need money and my job is stable and pays well. can it be done?
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    (Original post by shinytoy)
    But for me? i am doing a brain draining job, or very many hours, plus a TOUGH masters

    i need money and my job is stable and pays well. can it be done?
    Yes, it can be done. It is just as difficult as you're imagining it is going to be, though.

    I would actually recommend that you start by looking for the drop-out rate for the course you're thinking of undertaking - and remembering that everyone who started the course thought 'yeah I know it's going to be hard work, but I can do it' That will give you an indication of the quality of the support that the university gives part-time students and whether the expectations are realistic.

    My practical advice - be prepared to use up a good amount of your annual leave on taking study days whenever assignments are due
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    (Original post by Jantaculum)
    Yes, it can be done. It is just as difficult as you're imagining it is going to be, though.

    I would actually recommend that you start by looking for the drop-out rate for the course you're thinking of undertaking - and remembering that everyone who started the course thought 'yeah I know it's going to be hard work, but I can do it' That will give you an indication of the quality of the support that the university gives part-time students and whether the expectations are realistic.

    My practical advice - be prepared to use up a good amount of your annual leave on taking study days whenever assignments are due
    cheers brah thats what i thought.

    the drop out rate is very very high . the course is all qualified lawyers going in, a class of 15, declines to class of 3 actually graduating.

    i think im gonna do a modular masters MA at a crap*y college which is only gonna be about £3k so i can drop out anytime and still get an intermediate qualification. (pg cert or pg dip)

    then im gunna apply for the hardcore masters when i got more munni saved up so hopefully i can take sabbatical or something to do it full time and basically camp in a library for the year.

    it has an advantage that i can also have up to date academic refs, more dough in the bank, more knowledge and experience.

    but then i may end up with two masters which are vaguely similar.
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    I spoke to the lecturer of the hardcore course, he said actually the drop out rate is low, and the course is ALL full time working people
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    (Original post by shinytoy)
    I spoke to the lecturer of the hardcore course, he said actually the drop out rate is low, and the course is ALL full time working people
    Where did you get the original info about the drop out rate being very high? 3 out of an original 15 graduating is very specific. The lecturer has a stake in getting as many students as possible signed up to the course. Could your original source be more credible?
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    (Original post by Klix88)
    Where did you get the original info about the drop out rate being very high? 3 out of an original 15 graduating is very specific. The lecturer has a stake in getting as many students as possible signed up to the course. Could your original source be more credible?
    cardiff uni's website says there are 12-15 students starting the course im wanting to do. but I saw a grad list of all the dissertation titles submitted in 2012 on one of their websites and only 3 titles were listed for that course.
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    (Original post by shinytoy)
    cardiff uni's website says there are 12-15 students starting the course im wanting to do. but I saw a grad list of all the dissertation titles submitted in 2012 on one of their websites and only 3 titles were listed for that course.
    If that's an exhaustive list of all dissertations, it would seem to contradict what the lecturer said.
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    is the 60 hours a hard 60 hours or could it be 80 or a hundred (if you are in cf or ts or something)?

    if you want to have no social life, and spend your weekends and holidays working it will be doable

    also why bother with an LLM? being an accountant gives many more options if you want to work in business/finance
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    (Original post by Pariah)
    is the 60 hours a hard 60 hours or could it be 80 or a hundred (if you are in cf or ts or something)?

    if you want to have no social life, and spend your weekends and holidays working it will be doable

    also why bother with an LLM? being an accountant gives many more options if you want to work in business/finance
    no at tops it is 60. I can sometimes get away with 40.

    I spend my hols and weekends doing work in this area of study anyway and I want recognistion for it.

    yes you are right. if you are studying and want good money, loads jobs, stable career, and don't mind being bored become an accountant.

    but I have a great passion for laws, especially canon laws, unrelated to work. I am getting old and this is for me and my own fulfilment.
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    My personal view, and it is just a personal view, is that full-time work and strong academic performance aren't compatible.

    Performing well requires not only the ability to attend classes, which on a part-time course may or may not be scheduled outside of working hours, but the ability to devote a good amount of your mental energy to the course and to the assignments you'll undertake on that course. It is hard, if not impossible, to do that if you are working 40-60 hours a week.

    Everybody needs down time - for the good of our health as much as anything - and full time work/ part time study is unlikely to offer you much of that at all. You will find that you spend most of your evenings, weekends and annual leave dealing with the degree - whether it be reading, writing or attending classes. After a while that is likely to cause you either to resent it or to perform below your ability.

    Part-time course are good for recent graduates who want to earn a bit of money on the side whilst continuing their studies, people who have a job that they can scale back whilst still earning some money (i.e. retail jobs) or for people taking a break from work for other reasons (i.e. to bring up kids etc.). But I really wouldn't recommend them for somebody with your workload.

    At the end of the day it is up to you though. If you really think you'll be able to manage it,perform well and make use of the qualification then by all means go for it.
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    (Original post by Shelsey)
    My personal view, and it is just a personal view, is that full-time work and strong academic performance aren't compatible.

    Performing well requires not only the ability to attend classes, which on a part-time course may or may not be scheduled outside of working hours, but the ability to devote a good amount of your mental energy to the course and to the assignments you'll undertake on that course. It is hard, if not impossible, to do that if you are working 40-60 hours a week.

    Everybody needs down time - for the good of our health as much as anything - and full time work/ part time study is unlikely to offer you much of that at all. You will find that you spend most of your evenings, weekends and annual leave dealing with the degree - whether it be reading, writing or attending classes. After a while that is likely to cause you either to resent it or to perform below your ability.

    Part-time course are good for recent graduates who want to earn a bit of money on the side whilst continuing their studies, people who have a job that they can scale back whilst still earning some money (i.e. retail jobs) or for people taking a break from work for other reasons (i.e. to bring up kids etc.). But I really wouldn't recommend them for somebody with your workload.

    At the end of the day it is up to you though. If you really think you'll be able to manage it,perform well and make use of the qualification then by all means go for it.
    I honestly dont know. the course i am doing is very specialist and it is only lawyers and judges and priests doing it. and they work full time in 'real jobs'
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    its all cool guys. my boss says I can go down to four days a week
 
 
 
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