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The Welsh language is our revenge on the English Watch

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    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/ukne...e-English.html

    It’s not the best party trick in the world, I admit, but if you ever need anyone to recite Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrn drobwllllantysiliogogogoch at top speed, then I’m your woman. Yet shamefully, although I’m the daughter of a bilingual mother, my attempts to speak the language of heaven remain pretty rudimentary.
    Still, I absolutely support the decision by councils last week not to insert hyphens into Welsh placenames, in order for the English to be able to pronounce them more easily. Abermad would have become Aber-mad, and Felinfach would be Felin-fach, for example.
    The English have spent centuries imposing their will on the Welsh both by the sword and from Westminster. That is, when they are not making those endless jokes about male‑voice choirs, daffodils and sheep at Wales’s expense. The only revenge the Welsh can take is via the language – but what a powerful tool it can be.
    It may not compensate for all the pain of the past, but in truth what can be better than watching someone from England stuttering their way into the land of my fathers, painfully mangling the dd or ll consonants and stumbling over the mutations. And only then, of course, do you point out that the name was actually constructed as a publicity stunt back in Victorian times – and you can just say Llanfair PG instead.
    The Welsh language is thriving in Wales- alongside, rather than instead, of English- and I love those long Welsh words that are unpronouncable for an Englishman like me. They're excellent, and they make Wales Wales. I wouldn't have it any other way. There is no need to anglicise the Welsh spelling of words.
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    "Araf".
    That's my limit.
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    (Original post by navarre)
    There is no need to anglicise the Welsh spelling of words.
    What about the Welshifying of English words, like Cardiff?
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    (Original post by Harvey Dent)
    "Araf".
    That's my limit.
    "Look, I'm sorry about R-R-"

    "RACHEL!!!!"
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    (Original post by navarre)
    "Look, I'm sorry about R-R-"

    "RACHEL!!!!"
    "This isn't about what I want, it's about what's FAIR!"
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    welsh is such a pointless language
    noted, some ancient language are still quasi-important, e.g. latin, but welsh? come on
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    (Original post by Snagprophet)
    What about the Welshifying of English words, like Cardiff?
    Cardiff is of Welsh origin. Comes from the Old Welsh word "Caerdyf".

    I'm Welsh and I'm not going to justify the usefulness or uselessness of my language.
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    well this is cute. they say revenge is a dish best served cold, but this is just cold dead.
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    It is an odd language. Take this phrase:

    "Rwy'n llaeth fy geifr bob dydd."

    It looks like someone just slammed their head against a keyboard, but I guess that's why I like the Welsh language, despite knowing virtually nothing about it. It's different.
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    (Original post by AstroNandos)
    It is an odd language. Take this phrase:

    "Rwy'n llaeth fy geifr bob dydd."

    It looks like someone just slammed their head against a keyboard, but I guess that's why I like the Welsh language, despite knowing virtually nothing about it. It's different.
    It would be "llaethu". "Llaeth" is a noun and "llaethu" would be the verb form (llefrith in North Wales).

    Vocabulary differs quite a lot between the North and South.
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    "The English have spent centuries imposing their will on the Welsh both by the sword and from Westminster"

    By all means, let Wales free themselves from Westminster control. See how that works out for them.
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    (Original post by navarre)
    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/ukne...e-English.html

    The Welsh language is thriving in Wales- alongside, rather than instead, of English- and I love those long Welsh words that are unpronouncable for an Englishman like me. They're excellent, and they make Wales Wales. I wouldn't have it any other way. There is no need to anglicise the Welsh spelling of words.
    Yes, a language so great that it required law to make it mandatory because it was on deaths door.

    Given the record of the Welsh Assembly i'd be inclined to support Wales becoming the 10th region of England.
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    (Original post by navarre)
    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/ukne...e-English.html

    I love those long Welsh words that are unpronouncable for an Englishman like me. They're excellent, and they make Wales Wales. I wouldn't have it any other way. There is no need to anglicise the Welsh spelling of words.
    Agreed as well. There's something special about driving through Wales and seeing all the interesting place names. My favourite is Rhosllanerchrugog! (I'm English too).
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    Pointless language spoken by bigots, racists and the brainwashed. Give it 100 years and it'll be a historical footnote.
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    (Original post by Harvey Dent)
    "Araf".
    That's my limit.
    My neighbour's dog always says "araf" to me. I didn't know he was just speaking Welsh all this time :eek:
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    (Original post by WoodyMKC)
    My neighbour's dog always says "araf" to me. I didn't know he was just speaking Welsh all this time :eek:
    They come in all shapes and sizes, the Welsh.
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    (Original post by Harvey Dent)
    "This isn't about what I want, it's about what's FAIR!"
    "Your men, your plan."
    "Do I really look like a guy with a plan?"
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    (Original post by Gales)
    It would be "llaethu". "Llaeth" is a noun and "llaethu" would be the verb form (llefrith in North Wales).


    Vocabulary differs quite a lot between the North and South.
    Well I definitely didn't use Google translate :ninja:
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    (Original post by navarre)
    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/ukne...e-English.html



    The Welsh language is thriving in Wales- alongside, rather than instead, of English- and I love those long Welsh words that are unpronouncable for an Englishman like me. They're excellent, and they make Wales Wales. I wouldn't have it any other way. There is no need to anglicise the Welsh spelling of words.
    I suppose the reason why the welsh behave in a negative way to the English is because the English also treat their neighbours negative. We are constantly treating our neighbours badly whether they are the Welsh, Irish or the Scottish. Or Immigrants in general. I guess they give us a taste of our own grievance which we inflict on others.

    Most of this hatred is passed on by our parents. Most parents are stubborn and set in their ways. Its a shame that those of us who want to unite with our fellow Brits in the Union are often the ones who receive this discrimination up front.
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    I always feel sorry for foreign tourists in Wales, they must be so confused by all the names.

    Anyhow Welsh is a lovely language, and despite the stereotype most people who speak Welsh don't use it vindictively.
 
 
 
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