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    What is the average weekly workload for an engineering degree? Except Oxbridge, since I know they bust their asses. Don't count home studying and homework, just lectures, tutorials, and labs. You could mention the amount of homework too, but don't calculate it in terms of hours.

    P.S. Please state your college and course
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    (Original post by boyski33)
    What is the average weekly workload for an engineering degree? Except Oxbridge, since I know they bust their asses. Don't count home studying and homework, just lectures, tutorials, and labs. You could mention the amount of homework too, but don't calculate it in terms of hours.

    P.S. Please state your college and course
    Depends on the university to be honest. But in general you will have a lot of work at some point in the degree...sometimes it's calm and okay (still high contact hours though but it's not bad) then some weeks its packed with assignments and labs (and you'll feel mentally drained).
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    It's going to vary, including assignments and note writing, some weeks I've had less than 10 hours, others closer to 60. On average for my course I'd say 25-35 hours depending on the kind of person.
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    (Original post by Helloworld_95)
    It's going to vary, including assignments and note writing, some weeks I've had less than 10 hours, others closer to 60. On average for my course I'd say 25-35 hours depending on the kind of person.
    And where do you study/have studied?
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    (Original post by boyski33)
    And where do you study/have studied?
    Sheffield
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    Imperial would similarly be a killer, as they're renowned for their rigorous but excellent engineering degrees.
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    (Original post by Helloworld_95)
    Sheffield
    And what is your degree exactly? I've applied for Computer Engineering, which is basically electrical engineering with some programming (about 30-40%).
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    (Original post by TVIO)
    Imperial would similarly be a killer, as they're renowned for their rigorous but excellent engineering degrees.
    I think that's the better way to learn. I'd never apply for some course where I have 5 lectures a week for 9 grand a year. That's ridiculous! On the other hand, if you have to work your ass off insanely hard, it could be counterproductive either. 30 - 35 hours a week is optimal IMO
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    (Original post by boyski33)
    I think that's the better way to learn. I'd never apply for some course where I have 5 lectures a week for 9 grand a year. That's ridiculous! On the other hand, if you have to work your ass off insanely hard, it could be counterproductive either. 30 - 35 hours a week is optimal IMO
    Of course, I'd feel cheated if I didn't learn a significant amount. Uni is about learning/career progression, fun is a nice side effect of it. The different between Oxbridge and Imperial won't be a great deal really, they're all amazing unis. Be aware though: Cam have lectures on Saturdays (if I meet my CS offer my weekends are going to suck...), which probably puts them top in terms of workload.
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    (Original post by boyski33)
    And what is your degree exactly? I've applied for Computer Engineering, which is basically electrical engineering with some programming (about 30-40%).
    I'm doing aerospace engineering, which is a mix of everything except civil and chemical

    edit: should clarify that's at my uni, some are pretty much straight mechanical
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    Term time= next to nothing
    Exam time= modern slave


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    No but seriously though it's not that bad in first year... Depending on how well you want to do.

    An average day is about 0900-1700, including a mix of lectures, labs and tutorials.

    However, as you may have heard, in first year you only need 40% to pass and it doesn't effect your overall degree score(in most places).

    My thoughts during first year were to make the most of this and just enjoy myself but at the end of the day it's down to you and what you make of it.

    If you're worried about not being able to go out as much as other courses because of the long hours, don't be. In first year, I probably averaged about 3-5 nights a week. However, as in any other course but more so in engineering, expect that to change 2nd year onwards.

    Hope that answered your question.

    Civil eng
    Newcastle



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    I do Chemical Engineering at Manchester, and I'll be honest, the first semester wasn't too bad. The work load wasn't that high (although the fortnightly lab reports are a pain), and a lot of the content is A Level revision anyway.

    You get tests every so often for some of the modules, which count towards your final module mark.

    But like people have been saying, the first year isn't too important so no need to get stressed out; enjoy the relative freedom.

    For reference, here's my semester 2 timetable:

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