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    Hello! I got a conditional offer for the Cellular and Molecular Medicine course at Bristol and i wanted to know if anyone wants to go to Bristol University for CMM course as a first choice
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    I'm currently a first year so if anyone has any questions, shoot.
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    (Original post by spleenharvester)
    I'm currently a first year so if anyone has any questions, shoot.
    Yes, i have questions, thank you!! XD

    Firstly, did you apply last year for biomedical science course in any university? You see, I don't exactly know what is the difference between CMM and biomedical science, and if they are recognized the same way after graduating :-s

    Then, how is it there?

    1) do you like the teachers, how they explain, do they try to make you interested, are they neglecting you, are they helpful, do you understand how they teach?

    2) How is the university itself ? CMM course rooms, laboratories? Are you satisfied with the facilities?

    3) what extra things can you do regarding social life, are there societies?

    4) what about the city itself? Do you like it as a student there?

    5) what problems or difficulties have you encountered till today? (If any) or what exactly was the most challenging thing you had to fulfill or solve?

    6)how are the people around there? (Are they helpful and nice or not really)

    7) do you have time for yourself? How does your weekly schedule look like? (Have you considered part-time jobs? If no, do you think there is enough time for a part-time job?)

    8) if you are not working, do you know other students who are working part time ? If so, where are they working?

    9) how much money, on average, do your living costs (apart from accommodation) cost?

    10) are there things you are not happy about regarding any aspect of your current experience? Please tell us.

    These are the questions for now, I know there are a lot but I would be happy if you could answer anytime till April (when I have to choose between Bristol and Manchester hahah )

    Thank you extremely extremely much!

    Good luck with your exams!!
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    (Original post by jo_ann24)
    Firstly, did you apply last year for biomedical science course in any university? You see, I don't exactly know what is the difference between CMM and biomedical science, and if they are recognized the same way after graduating :-s
    I don't know a huge amount about Biomedical Science, but I do know that BMS is a lot more competitive. I think while they will share a lot of content, BMS contains things that are clinically more useful. Not entirely sure on that one!

    1) do you like the teachers, how they explain, do they try to make you interested, are they neglecting you, are they helpful, do you understand how they teach?
    Mixed bag with this one - lecturers change a LOT throughout the term. Some are fantastic, some less so. I can't speak for all of them as I was ill for quite a while so missed some of them entirely! But as far as the actual course content goes it is incredibly interesting, and if you are looking for a career in research science I cannot recommend it enough. (I actually applied for Biochem originally, got rejected, but got offered CMM instead - I am actually very glad that happened). It's also worth noting that CMM is a very good degree to have if you are considering going into graduate entry medicine (which something like 8% of CMM graduates do each year and I am planning to do myself).

    Most of the content is well taught and easy enough to understand as long as you put your back into it. You get chance to go and speak to the lecturer (or email them) if you have trouble with anything taught in that lecture, too.

    We also have some tutorial sessions that help us in writing essays, answering questions and stuff. While at A-level that was the kind of extra fluff I just found no use whatsoever, at Bris they are actually very helpful, and prepare you very well for what is expected of you in the exam.

    2) How is the university itself ? CMM course rooms, laboratories? Are you satisfied with the facilities?
    Facilities themselves are pretty fantastic, yeah - lecture halls are nice and comfortable, labs are well kitted out as you'd expect.

    The only downside is that studying facilities, mostly libraries, are pretty badly overloaded. It's more of a problem for arts/social sciences libraries than medsci and chemistry, but there are times when it is borderline impossible to find a place.

    3) what extra things can you do regarding social life, are there societies?
    Lots of societies, a lot of people haven't really paid attention since we got here though at first it seems like a great idea to join chocolate society etc etc but noone actually gets round to doing it, haha.

    Social life out here is great, even if you don't get on with people at your hall, you will always meet people through some other means! Always plenty of things to do.

    4) what about the city itself? Do you like it as a student there?
    Most definitely, there are probably better places to go socially or for nightlife (Leeds for example) but Bristol is still a really great place! I would definitely recommend going on open days to any universities you are considering, look at the accommodation if possible, try and get a feel for the area.

    5) what problems or difficulties have you encountered till today? (If any) or what exactly was the most challenging thing you had to fulfill or solve?
    Aside from financial (further down the page) - that will be keeping on top of work. And I know a lot of other people who are in the same situation. It's really hard to get back into study after having a few months off the monotony of A-level, followed by freshers. I'd done virtually no notes by the time December rolled around, it was a massive stress to get everything done over christmas, and I only had a few days to revise afterwards.

    What I'm trying to say is - as fun as university is, keep on top of it, even if it's just your first year! There are 9 lectures a week, and each takes about 2-3 hours to make notes on. That is nothing compared to having weeks and weeks to catch up with! But all the same, don't go crazy over it, we get a lot more free time this year than next.

    6)how are the people around there? (Are they helpful and nice or not really)
    Assuming you mean socially - there's a mixture, same as anywhere else There are some really great people here, and some who are not so.

    7) do you have time for yourself? How does your weekly schedule look like? (Have you considered part-time jobs? If no, do you think there is enough time for a part-time job?)
    Under normal conditions when I haven't left it all to the last minute, definitely a fair amount! My weekly timetable is usually 9 lectures (each an hour), 2 labs (allocated 3 hours but some finish quite early), and occasionally some tutorials/speech sessions/other stuff. That leaves more than enough time for doing our own thing.

    As far as jobs go - see below:

    8) if you are not working, do you know other students who are working part time ? If so, where are they working?
    I know a few people who are working jobs within the university itself - but they are in general doing less strenuous courses. In general it's a pretty bad idea in my opinion - even if the first year grade does not count towards the end of the degree, it is still pretty valuable as far as adapting to note taking in lectures, for example. CMM year 1 is certainly not the most difficult course and even then I couldn't possibly imagine working a job at the same time.

    9) how much money, on average, do your living costs (apart from accommodation) cost?

    10) are there things you are not happy about regarding any aspect of your current experience? Please tell us.
    I've decided to answer these two together as money is probably my biggest problem with the place. My living costs, are on average, £6,400 - that's £4550 at University Hall, £400 for going out (I haven't spent nearly as much as I thought, nights out are surprisingly cheap if you predrink an awful lot), £25/week food, and any other supplies. In comparison to other unis, that is damn expensive.

    Personally, my student loan is only £4,100 in maintenance, meaning I have to work the extra £2,300 over the summer months. If I knew it would be this much trouble financially before coming here I probably wouldn't have come here, so please consider it! If you're one of the people lucky enough to get like maximum loan and maximum grant it will be absolutely no problem, but if not, you will end up in the same situation as me!

    Aside from that - my only real problem with the place is living in Stoke Bishop. I absolutely despise UH for various reasons and the buses are incredibly inconvenient (though Stoke Bishop as a place is quite nice, just not UH!). I've been on the transfer list since week 3 and have gotten absolutely nowhere and have pretty much just been messed around. I know I am in the minority with that opinion, so take that with a pinch of salt.

    Also be aware that we have to find our own properties to live in for next year from a few months after starting our first year, and it is very time consuming and difficult. The same goes for the majority of universities, but some handle it better than others (I know Warwick for example does pretty much everything through the university itself without having to deal with agencies etc).

    These are the questions for now, I know there are a lot but I would be happy if you could answer anytime till April (when I have to choose between Bristol and Manchester hahah )

    Thank you extremely extremely much!

    Good luck with your exams!!
    Haha fair enough, thankyou! Good luck with UCAS (I haven't forgotten what a complete pain in the ass it is)! Let me know if you have any other questions about actual content on the course or how things are assessed!
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    To begin with, THANK YOU SOOOOO MUCH for the long answer! You have no ideea what a blessing it is

    (Original post by spleenharvester)

    Mixed bag with this one - lecturers change a LOT throughout the term. Some are fantastic, some less so. I can't speak for all of them as I was ill for quite a while so missed some of them entirely! But as far as the actual course content goes it is incredibly interesting, and if you are looking for a career in research science I cannot recommend it enough. (I actually applied for Biochem originally, got rejected, but got offered CMM instead - I am actually very glad that happened). It's also worth noting that CMM is a very good degree to have if you are considering going into graduate entry medicine (which something like 8% of CMM graduates do each year and I am planning to do myself).
    Oh, i see, but over-all you are satisfied as far as i understand, right?

    (Original post by spleenharvester)
    Most of the content is well taught and easy enough to understand as long as you put your back into it. You get chance to go and speak to the lecturer (or email them) if you have trouble with anything taught in that lecture, too.

    We also have some tutorial sessions that help us in writing essays, answering questions and stuff. While at A-level that was the kind of extra fluff I just found no use whatsoever, at Bris they are actually very helpful, and prepare you very well for what is expected of you in the exam.
    I am a EU student and i have other exams, the Baccalaureate, not the A-levels so it is super-awesome that you can ask the teachers and attend the tutorials!! xD

    (Original post by spleenharvester)

    I know a few people who are working jobs within the university itself - but they are in general doing less strenuous courses. In general it's a pretty bad idea in my opinion - even if the first year grade does not count towards the end of the degree, it is still pretty valuable as far as adapting to note taking in lectures, for example. CMM year 1 is certainly not the most difficult course and even then I couldn't possibly imagine working a job at the same time.
    Ohhh as i said before i am a EU student and i can apply for the student loan only. I guess i will recieve £9000 because my parents have a suuper low income. So, if i am not going to take a job or get the VC Scholarhip (which is £3000/year) i don't know how i will survive :/ I am optimistic just because i am used to having a busy extracurricular schedule apart from highschool and i hope i will do well with both (part-time job and the studies).

    (Original post by spleenharvester)
    I've decided to answer these two together as money is probably my biggest problem with the place. My living costs, are on average, £6,400 - that's £4550 at University Hall, £400 for going out (I haven't spent nearly as much as I thought, nights out are surprisingly cheap if you predrink an awful lot), £25/week food, and any other supplies. In comparison to other unis, that is damn expensive.

    Personally, my student loan is only £4,100 in maintenance, meaning I have to work the extra £2,300 over the summer months. If I knew it would be this much trouble financially before coming here I probably wouldn't have come here, so please consider it! If you're one of the people lucky enough to get like maximum loan and maximum grant it will be absolutely no problem, but if not, you will end up in the same situation as me!
    Can you pleeeaase please be kind and sum up your costs and say how much do you spend per month for 1) food, transport, other daily costs and 2)accomodation. I did not clearly understand how you explained because some of them were per year (but i don't know how much it costs / month) and other were per week
    Thank you and sorry for putting you to sum them up again. Also, please do not substract your maintenance loan or grant. Thankssss

    (Original post by spleenharvester)
    Aside from that - my only real problem with the place is living in Stoke Bishop. I absolutely despise UH for various reasons and the buses are incredibly inconvenient (though Stoke Bishop as a place is quite nice, just not UH!). I've been on the transfer list since week 3 and have gotten absolutely nowhere and have pretty much just been messed around. I know I am in the minority with that opinion, so take that with a pinch of salt.
    What is Stoke Bishop and UH? Sorry but i don't know these things :")
    Oh, and i remembered another question: If you apply for the university accomodation, how do they choose if YOU will get the house you applied for and not other student? The first applicant the first served?

    (Original post by spleenharvester)
    Also be aware that we have to find our own properties to live in for next year from a few months after starting our first year, and it is very time consuming and difficult. The same goes for the majority of universities, but some handle it better than others (I know Warwick for example does pretty much everything through the university itself without having to deal with agencies etc).
    Are you telling me that you cannot live in the campus, in the Bristol's houses more than one year?! :O !!!! Oh Godness, please ell me that i misunderstood (

    (Original post by spleenharvester)

    Haha fair enough, thankyou! Good luck with UCAS (I haven't forgotten what a complete pain in the ass it is)! Let me know if you have any other questions about actual content on the course or how things are assessed!
    Thank you hahha but there is nothing i can do now but wait for all the Unis to answer

    Thank you soooooo much again because you answered all the questions, you helped me a lot!!

    Best wishes!
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    (Original post by jo_ann24)
    Oh, i see, but over-all you are satisfied as far as i understand, right?
    Indeed I am.

    I am a EU student and i have other exams, the Baccalaureate, not the A-levels so it is super-awesome that you can ask the teachers and attend the tutorials!! xD
    Ah fair, I've heard the Baccalaureates are really difficult!

    Ohhh as i said before i am a EU student and i can apply for the student loan only. I guess i will recieve £9000 because my parents have a suuper low income. So, if i am not going to take a job or get the VC Scholarhip (which is £3000/year) i don't know how i will survive :/ I am optimistic just because i am used to having a busy extracurricular schedule apart from highschool and i hope i will do well with both (part-time job and the studies).

    Can you pleeeaase please be kind and sum up your costs and say how much do you spend per month for 1) food, transport, other daily costs and 2)accomodation. I did not clearly understand how you explained because some of them were per year (but i don't know how much it costs / month) and other were per week
    Thank you and sorry for putting you to sum them up again. Also, please do not substract your maintenance loan or grant. Thankssss
    Ahhh I see how the situation is now. Very tricky. It's certainly not impossible to carry a job at the same time, but it will be difficult to balance around studies and social life at the same time! If you could get that scholarship, and work a job over the summer holidays, you would probably have enough.

    My costs at the moment are broke down as follows -
    Accommodation - University Hall is £450/month for 10 months (most second year places are on a 12 month contract, but are slightly cheaper per month, so it usually works out to the same cost)
    Food - £100/month
    Money for going out - £40/month (some will spend more though!)
    Laundry - £8/month
    Transport - for first year people living in halls get a free bus pass. For second year most people will live within walking distance of the university.
    Supplies (toiletries, etc) - £20/month

    Which comes to £618/month. There are other possible costs such as haircuts and gym to bear in mind too.

    My maintenance loan is £4100 for the year which means if I work over the summer holidays I should be able to make up for the difference of ~£2300/year.

    What is Stoke Bishop and UH? Sorry but i don't know these things :")
    Oh, and i remembered another question: If you apply for the university accomodation, how do they choose if YOU will get the house you applied for and not other student? The first applicant the first served?

    Are you telling me that you cannot live in the campus, in the Bristol's houses more than one year?! :O !!!! Oh Godness, please ell me that i misunderstood (
    Stoke Bishop is the site slightly further away from the uni where university hall (UH), Hiatt Baker, Badock, Wills, and Durdham halls are located, and are served by the university's own buses. A lot of the other residences are very close to the university as they are right in the middle of the city.

    As for year 2 - that is correct, and unfortunately the same for most universities (I don't know of any at all that house all their second and third year undergrads). You have to find a group of usually 2-5 other people and rent out a house for later years on a 12 month contract (which, as before, is slightly cheaper per month so usually the same price as halls). It is a real hassle to do. I know that the university does allow some people with financial difficulties to return to halls, but it's a very small number of people.

    Thank you hahha but there is nothing i can do now but wait for all the Unis to answer

    Thank you soooooo much again because you answered all the questions, you helped me a lot!!

    Best wishes!
    Glad to be of help, hope it works out for you!
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    I am a Third year CMM student, so if anyone has any questions about the course in general or the latter years / career prospects etc then ask away
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    Firstly, did you apply last year for biomedical science course in any university? You see, I don't exactly know what is the difference between CMM and biomedical science, and if they are recognized the same way after graduating :-s

    Then, how is it there?
    I tended to stay away from Biomedical sciences courses. They tend to be extremely competitive (seeing as they are the fifth choice for most medical students). Previous commenters are right, they have a more clinical focus - which some find more appealing - than CMM does. CMM is somewhat unique in that it is a bit of a mix between traditional science courses like Biochemistry and more clinical ones like Biomedical sciences. As you progress through the course, the clinical focus is there if you want to go down that route.

    1) do you like the teachers, how they explain, do they try to make you interested, are they neglecting you, are they helpful, do you understand how they teach?
    This is a very broad question. Like all courses, some lectures and lecturers will be good, others slightly boring. You get regular tutorials in the first and second year, which really help with understanding the lecture content and the deadlines for these tutorials keep you focused. Over the length of the course they teach you how to stand on your own feet and by the third year there is very little contact with staff.

    2) How is the university itself ? CMM course rooms, laboratories? Are you satisfied with the facilities?
    UoB generally has a bit of a problem with its facilities. The city is small and space is limited, so the uni tends to have to make do with the slightly old buildings that it has got. That said, sciences have it better than the arts. The faculty building is perfectly fine. Labs are well equipped, comfortable to work in and rarely feel cramped. Most lecture halls are in the faculty building and a comfortable. When you do have to go to other buildings for lectures, it tends to not be that far. The tutorial rooms in first and second year are slightly disappointing, you are often cramped into a tiny cold room that feels like someone's living room, but that is the one downside. The library is very good, albeit a little cramped. If you get there early enough you are always guaranteed a space. There are loads of computers and the silent study area is a really comfortable place to work if you like that kind of environment.

    3) what extra things can you do regarding social life, are there societies?
    Since all societies tend to be student run, if you can think of it, someone has set up a society for it. It's also pretty easy to set up your own society if you kind find what you're looking for. You have to be careful how involved you become though, especially in the latter years, as you simply won't have the time.

    4) what about the city itself? Do you like it as a student there?
    I'm pretty biased, but I couldn't think of a better city to be a student. Nightlife (although it's not really my thing) is great and though there are some clubs that are pretty out of the way, most of them are pretty central and close to each other. Bristol is in a great place right now, it is clear to see that the city is rich as hell and new things are being built everyday. Cabot circus has changed so much for the better from when I first came and it is awesome now. Places like Gloucester Road and St. Paul's are really cool too. The city feels big enough to explore and always have stuff to do, but small enough to get your head around things quickly.

    5) what problems or difficulties have you encountered till today? (If any) or what exactly was the most challenging thing you had to fulfill or solve?
    I personally suffered a great deal from homesickness and just generally feeling miserable in particularly the first year and also the second. The pastoral staff in halls (I was in UH) were AMAZING. The senior resident became a really good friend and helped me a lot and the warden and other staff were really understanding. Also, the student counselling service (which I went to weekly for two years) is fantastic. Without them I probably would have left.

    I have also suffered a lot throughout uni from medical problems, so I experienced the student health service quite a lot. They aren't quite as good as the counselling service and appointments are quite hard to come by, but the doctors and nurses are helpful and understanding.

    6)how are the people around there? (Are they helpful and nice or not really)
    Not quite sure what you mean, but most of the staff I have met in various sections of the uni have been fine. The administrative staff tend to be a little more frustrating (the people who deal with student money problems etc) but all the teaching staff, security staff and careers advice staff are all good.

    7) do you have time for yourself? How does your weekly schedule look like? (Have you considered part-time jobs? If no, do you think there is enough time for a part-time job?)
    The short answer - not really! You have to be aware that by applying to a course like CMM you are dedicating yourself to an extremely busy schedule. In first and second year, with lectures, tutorials and labs you will rack up around 30 hours a week. Bare in mind that you will also have to spend time in the library consolidating your knowledge from the lectures and preparing essays or presentations for the tutorials. Throughout the course I have been in the library from 9 - 5 every day and you will have to work on weekends sometimes as well. In third year, you are only timetabled to have around 10 hours of contact time a week, but you have to make up the rest of the time yourself as well.

    Therefore, I would say it is virtually impossible to do all that and have a part-time job. I don't know anyone in any of the 3 years I've been on this course who has had a part-time job.

    That might sound a little negative and the workload a bit oppressive, but that's just what it is.

    8) if you are not working, do you know other students who are working part time ? If so, where are they working?
    I don't know of any science students who are working, but the arts students I know tend to get work in bars and pubs.

    9) how much money, on average, do your living costs (apart from accommodation) cost?
    It depends on your lifestyle. I don't go out at all really, so I have saved a lot of money that way. I generally spend around £50 a week on food (but I have dietary requirements - gluten free etc that make it far more expensive than most people)....and that is pretty much it. Once rent (which is EXTORTIONATE in all years, but particularly once you rent privately in second and third year) goes out, that's pretty much all I have.

    This is the downside of Bristol getting better as a city; it's also getting more expensive. Certain things, like student rent, are way above the national average and I would suggest are the highest in any city other than London.

    10) are there things you are not happy about regarding any aspect of your current experience? Please tell us.
    Money is a bit of an issue, rent for some of the halls - particularly UH (where I was in first year, absolute ****hole) and Hiatt Baker - is ridiculous. The rate of rent increases for private renting is ridiculous. The house that I lived in last year (£385 per week) is now going for £420 and it was barely standing up, let alone comfortable.

    I have plenty of issues with the way CMM is organised as you go through the course as well. I have mentioned above how much work you do and it can be frustrating how little this counts for. Second year counts for only 25% of the grade, which is staggeringly low and lower than any other course I have encountered at Bristol. That may seem good now, as it gives you plenty of opportunity to mess up and still do okay, but it puts A LOT of pressure on finals. The project, which takes up around 500 hours of time in third year, barely counts for anything. This degree is a VERY exam-focused degree. While this shouldn't put you off applying for the course, you should be aware that only around 20% of the entire degree mark is made up by coursework marks. Doing endless essays and pieces of coursework that meant very little in terms of contributing to my degree mark has probably been my biggest irritation.

    I hope those answers are okay and help you out, if you have any more questions then don't hesitate to ask!
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    (Original post by joe_m_c)
    I am a Third year CMM student, so if anyone has any questions about the course in general or the latter years / career prospects etc then ask away
    I have a question of my own. How does the experience in years 2 and 3 compare to 1 as far as actual application to real life uses go? Because right now, with ITM, NTC and BIOC, while we've learnt a lot of useful stuff - it feels like some of it is just jumping hoops for the sake of it, A-level style. How much of the first year study comes in use in later years?

    Oh yeah, and do you happen to know what time of the year we typically apply for post-grad, and if we can take a gap year? I am quite worried that I will apply to graduate entry medicine, get rejected, and be left with no other options if you have to apply at the same time.
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    (Original post by spleenharvester)
    I have a question of my own. How does the experience in years 2 and 3 compare to 1 as far as actual application to real life uses go? Because right now, with ITM, NTC and BIOC, while we've learnt a lot of useful stuff - it feels like some of it is just jumping hoops for the sake of it, A-level style. How much of the first year study comes in use in later years?
    That's a good question, and something that I have found slightly irritating over the course. Year 2 is similar to Year 1 in that there is a lot of theoretical learning to do, although depending on your unit choices in Year 2 you may be lectured by a few clinicians. Year 3 is different though, it is entirely in your court how clinical and practical it is. There, for example, units run by a guy who runs a department in the BRI and that are focused on cancer therapy. You can choose a very clinical project based in the BRI too. So yeah, third year is when it gets more relevant to the 'real' world.

    I found that it depends on the units as to whether knowledge carries across years. Biochem is irrelevant really because you don't need it at all in third year, but some of the immunology stuff you learn in the first couple of years remains useful and required in year 3.

    Oh yeah, and do you happen to know what time of the year we typically apply for post-grad, and if we can take a gap year? I am quite worried that I will apply to graduate entry medicine, get rejected, and be left with no other options if you have to apply at the same time.
    Time of year depends on the level you are applying for. PhD applications tend to have a deadline of around November time, with interviews in Jan-March. MSc application deadlines tend to be later; the one I am looking at has a deadline of March and interviews in April/May. I don't really know about graduate level medicine, but seeing as there are exams to sit to get in, I would assume it would be a similar time to PhD applications.

    In terms of a gap year, again it depends on what the qualification is. People don't tend to take them before PhDs, but it is quite common for MSCs. Again, not too sure for grad medicine.

    Obviously this is a while away for you, but in terms of my experience, I would always consider a gap year before post-grad. Whether it is to earn some money and get some work experience, enjoy one last long break or just to think things over before applying, I would say it is worth considering
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    (Original post by Devious Hat)
    Hi Spleen,

    I applied to CMM for 2016 entry - How is your course going at the moment?
    Hey, all is going well right now - have responded to your message btw
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    What halls would you recommend?
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    I'm really interested in doing cellular and molecular medicine but I just want to know more about the actual career you'd go into after doing the degree, what are the employment rates like, etc?
 
 
 
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