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    I am currently doing my AS level in school and I'm still not sure whether I want to do Architecture or Computer Science for University.
    (I'm doing Physics, Maths, History and Psychology for A levels)

    I feel like enjoying what I do is very important for me to enjoy university but I also don't want to graduate knowing that I might not be able to get a job or a low pay.

    However, I am sure that I would enjoy Architecture as a subject more than computer science but the problem is that I'm not doing any art/design subjects for A levels (but did get A* in gcse DT) but if I put my mind to it I would be spending time perfecting my portfolio and also everybody has been saying that the pay is not worth it for such a long course.

    I also believe that I would do fine in Computer Science but I won't enjoy it as much as it has a lot of Maths and Physics and I don't think I can go through 3 years of that but the pro is that it has a good pay and almost guaranteed job.
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    Hey there, you're probably in the exact same situation as I was last year (minus the computer science bit). I did Maths, Further maths, geog and econ, and A* textile at gcse. I was stuck between architecture and accountancy, which is kinda weird tbh.

    But yeah if you think you're going to enjoy it, start going to open days and researching. I started last year waaaay before anyone else, I was going to the open days that were meant to be for Year 13s. Checking out a few and talking to the admissions tutors or course directors helps a lot.

    Also you can apply for this programme called Accelerate into University, which is designed specifically for Yr11/12s who want to go into architecture. I found the programme by purely by luck, but I think it made such a big difference being the most important factor that settled my heart onto apply for arch this year. The programme basically involves a workshops with current uni students at he Bartlett and also work experience opportunities.

    I now have offers from two unis without submitting a portfolio and waiting for offers from the other three.

    So yeah, getting into arch at uni is possible without art, PM me if you have any more questions. Good luck!
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    (Original post by JHZ)
    Hey there, you're probably in the exact same situation as I was last year (minus the computer science bit). I did Maths, Further maths, geog and econ, and A* textile at gcse. I was stuck between architecture and accountancy, which is kinda weird tbh.

    But yeah if you think you're going to enjoy it, start going to open days and researching. I started last year waaaay before anyone else, I was going to the open days that were meant to be for Year 13s. Checking out a few and talking to the admissions tutors or course directors helps a lot.

    Also you can apply for this programme called Accelerate into University, which is designed specifically for Yr11/12s who want to go into architecture. I found the programme by purely by luck, but I think it made such a big difference being the most important factor that settled my heart onto apply for arch this year. The programme basically involves a workshops with current uni students at he Bartlett and also work experience opportunities.

    I now have offers from two unis without submitting a portfolio and waiting for offers from the other three.

    So yeah, getting into arch at uni is possible without art, PM me if you have any more questions. Good luck!
    Thank you so muchh!! but I live overseas so the programme and the open days would be pretty much impossible for me

    Are you studying in university right now? how's it??
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    Do computer science, it's mostly coding, not really calculus. If you're a creative person then you still have the opportunity to join loads of these well-paying modern-economy roles where you can develop projects or website or apps or games.
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    Listen, I'm currently in my third year studying architecture and my brother is a third year computer scientist!

    I had originally chosen architecture when I felt I needed something to branch my interest in both the science and arts, but in reality it is mostly arts (with the exception of some universities). If you feel like you'd prefer creative expression, architecture might be better suited for you. There are some technical aspects involved but as already stated the majority of the time you'd be arguing with jurors in presentations about the sociopolitical aspects of your design rather than in-depth discussions regarding the physics. If you're a visual person, architecture is probably also the preferred option... I know my brother spends a lot of time staring at a screen of code but that's what makes sense to him and that's what he enjoys. I remember in his first year he'd been studying a lot of physics - I wouldn't be able to tell you the exact ins and outs but I would offer this suggestion: there is a wide possibility for the cross over of both. Right now, architects are using increasingly sophisticated modeling software that requires some knowledge of coding. Obviously, the level to which you choose to explore the coding option in architecture depends on the kind of job you might like in the future, and I know my university has units that are specifically regarded as the 'coding and technological unit', programming robots and mechanical cities of the future. We've had examples of computer scientists discovering a passion for architecture and transferring course into the architecture department at a higher level, where it can be appreciated (4th and 5th year, as long as you can demonstrate spatial thinking/theory with a strong portfolio), but this of course is at the discretion of the school.
    The company I'd worked at last summer also had quite a large cross over - some compsci's were practicing some form of architecture and others that graduated as architects also involved themselves in programming. That company also did training sessions specifically to allow the architects to learn some coding should they need it - I'm saying all this as a long-term insight into the potential futures of both professions. Although a complete overlap is unlikely to occur (the compsci kids in a company would not be involved in the architecture as heavily as the architects and vice versa), there is an opportunity for some overlap - so pick what you can imagine yourself doing for the best of approx. 4 years (compsci) or architecture (approx. 7!)

    In terms of the money, yes - computer science does pay more than architecture (that's why I'm personally going to do exactly as I'd advised above and glean some coding skills where I can to maybe rake in some more ka-ching)
    It also doesn't matter whether you've done a 'creative' A-Level such as Fine Art (although they do prefer it IN GENERAL because it means a person is exposed to certain teachings and drawing practices) but if you're able to submit a comprehensive portfolio demonstrating your skill, it won't be a problem for a lot of universities. I know on my course some people transferred from seemingly unrelated things like electrical engineering and economics...

    I hope that helps a bit!
 
 
 
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