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    Salve!
    Though I'd make a thread for GCSE Latin students who are currently studying the set texts - Virgil (Nisus and Euryalus) and Cicero (In Verrem) and Livy (Scaevola and Cloelia). Thought we could share ideas, eg literay devices used, helpful background, language analysis, to help us all get great marks in the exam!
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    Hi!
    I'm studying the same set texts as you! How did you find the mocks?? I feel pretty confident with Cicero now but we still haven't finished Virgil and I'm struggling with the langauge analysis- any tips? I did find some general literary features on the OCR website though which I used for Cicero, it's just more difficult to apply them to poetry!

    I'll paste them here in case they help you at all:


    repetition words may be repeated at the
    beginning or end of sentences or phrases that
    either seek to amplify a point or to present an
    antithesis, or opposite point of view.


    anaphora this is one specific type of repetition
    where a word or phrase is repeated at the
    beginning of successive clauses, it is quite often
    used in conjunction with the tricolon crescens

    asyndeton the omission of conjunctions from a
    list is used to express anything forcefully, and the
    items on the list are meant to be appear numerous
    as a result; the list seems exhaustive


    polysyndeton the use of numerous conjunctions in
    a list produces a similar effect to asyndeton and is
    designed to highlight the extent of the items being
    covered.


    pleonasm the use of copious words beyond
    what is actually necessary to convey meaning.


    antithesis the opposition of ideas designed to
    highlight the conflict between two words or states
    of affairs.

    exclamation calling out to someone.


    tricolon delivering ideas in threes; when
    there is a sense that the second point is more
    forceful, important or emphasised than the first,
    and the third point more than the second, this is
    known as a ‘tricolon crescens’ or ‘tricolon crescendo’.


    polyptoton the use of a word several times
    in quick succession with different inflections,
    designed to draw attention to that item


    tautology saying the same thing more than
    once in order to leave the listener in no doubt as to
    the point you are trying to make.


    the rhetorical question used to drive home
    a point very emphatically; questions require
    answers, so put the questioned person ‘on the
    spot’; in a rhetorical question, the answer would
    be impossible, awkward or embarrassing for the
    person being questioned.
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    TSR Community Team
    I've just popped this in the Classics forum for you guys

    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/forumdisplay.php?f=191
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    (Original post by TheClassicsGeek)
    Hi!
    I'm studying the same set texts as you! How did you find the mocks?? I feel pretty confident with Cicero now but we still haven't finished Virgil and I'm struggling with the langauge analysis- any tips? I did find some general literary features on the OCR website though which I used for Cicero, it's just more difficult to apply them to poetry!

    I'll paste them here in case they help you at all:


    repetition words may be repeated at the
    beginning or end of sentences or phrases that
    either seek to amplify a point or to present an
    antithesis, or opposite point of view.


    anaphora this is one specific type of repetition
    where a word or phrase is repeated at the
    beginning of successive clauses, it is quite often
    used in conjunction with the tricolon crescens

    asyndeton the omission of conjunctions from a
    list is used to express anything forcefully, and the
    items on the list are meant to be appear numerous
    as a result; the list seems exhaustive


    polysyndeton the use of numerous conjunctions in
    a list produces a similar effect to asyndeton and is
    designed to highlight the extent of the items being
    covered.


    pleonasm the use of copious words beyond
    what is actually necessary to convey meaning.


    antithesis the opposition of ideas designed to
    highlight the conflict between two words or states
    of affairs.

    exclamation calling out to someone.


    tricolon delivering ideas in threes; when
    there is a sense that the second point is more
    forceful, important or emphasised than the first,
    and the third point more than the second, this is
    known as a ‘tricolon crescens’ or ‘tricolon crescendo’.


    polyptoton the use of a word several times
    in quick succession with different inflections,
    designed to draw attention to that item


    tautology saying the same thing more than
    once in order to leave the listener in no doubt as to
    the point you are trying to make.


    the rhetorical question used to drive home
    a point very emphatically; questions require
    answers, so put the questioned person ‘on the
    spot’; in a rhetorical question, the answer would
    be impossible, awkward or embarrassing for the
    person being questioned.
    My mocks went OK I guess, 1 mark off an A*. Definitely find language easier what about you?


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    Virgil definitely has a much different style from Cicero and Livy. Look out especially for polyptoton - overuse of connectives for effect eg. "Hadumque Fadumque abit [then other names with -que]


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    Polyptoton emphasises just how many people were killed in the scene I mentioned


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    (Original post by spurs9393)
    Virgil definitely has a much different style from Cicero and Livy. Look out especially for polyptoton - overuse of connectives for effect eg. "Hadumque Fadumque abit [then other names with -que]


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    Polyptoton is the repetition of the same word with variation, usually in different cases, for example "illum absens absentem auditque videtque" (Virgil, Aeneid IV). I think the word you are looking for is polysyndeton (multiple conjunctions), for example "illum absentem auditque videoque". But I agree, it emphasises the number of people killed
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    (Original post by amylouisetommo)
    Polyptoton is the repetition of the same word with variation, usually in different cases, for example "illum absens absentem auditque videtque" (Virgil, Aeneid IV). I think the word you are looking for is polysyndeton (multiple conjunctions), for example "illum absentem auditque videoque". But I agree, it emphasises the number of people killed
    Thanks 👍


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    Yeah i think language is much better, I got A* in my language papers , but I haven't sat the lit ones yet, I'm just sooo worried about Virgil!
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    (Original post by TheClassicsGeek)
    Yeah i think language is much better, I got A* in my language papers , but I haven't sat the lit ones yet, I'm just sooo worried about Virgil!
    I prefer Virgil to Cicero/Livy. Haven't done much analysis for Vice and Virtue so bit worried about that


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    Bump... Anyone else studying these?


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    (Original post by spurs9393)
    Bump... Anyone else studying these?


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    Yes, I have my mock for Cicero (not study Livy yet) and I'm on the verge of crying! Nothing is sticking in my head...gosh, why is latin so hard?
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    (Original post by XxsciencemathsxX)
    Yes, I have my mock for Cicero (not study Livy yet) and I'm on the verge of crying! Nothing is sticking in my head...gosh, why is latin so hard?
    I know I feel the same! I found the Cicero set text the most interesting but unfortunately I had literally no notes for it! What sort of language does Cicero use frequently and what effect does this have? We can get through this!!


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    (Original post by spurs9393)
    I know I feel the same! I found the Cicero set text the most interesting but unfortunately I had literally no notes for it! What sort of language does Cicero use frequently and what effect does this have? We can get through this!!


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    Circero uses a lot of allieration to stress the fact that he is angry and contempt with both Verres and Cleomenes. His use of sibilance like, "classis in speciem" (A fine fleet in appearance). The 's' creates a very cynical and evil image- again emphasising the evilness of Verres? You?
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    (Original post by XxsciencemathsxX)
    Circero uses a lot of allieration to stress the fact that he is angry and contempt with both Verres and Cleomenes. His use of sibilance like, "classis in speciem" (A fine fleet in appearance). The 's' creates a very cynical and evil image- again emphasising the evilness of Verres? You?
    I don't know too much about Cicero but the frequent use of "iste" puts the blame onto these men, and it is a more hostile word, emphasising his anger - it is almost like he is pointing their finger at them.

    I'd probably be more use regarding Virgil to be honest but I'll try and exchange as many ideas as possible about Cicero


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    (Original post by spurs9393)
    I don't know too much about Cicero but the frequent use of "iste" puts the blame onto these men, and it is a more hostile word, emphasising his anger - it is almost like he is pointing their finger at them.

    I'd probably be more use regarding Virgil to be honest but I'll try and exchange as many ideas as possible about Cicero


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    Thank you! Talk later then about Cicero and Livy- though right now I am trying to memorise the last few lines of it!
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    (Original post by XxsciencemathsxX)
    Thank you! Talk later then about Cicero and Livy- though right now I am trying to memorise the last few lines of it!
    No problems - look forward to it!


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    (Original post by spurs9393)
    No problems - look forward to it!


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    Do you know Cicero off by heart?
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    (Original post by XxsciencemathsxX)
    Do you know Cicero off by heart?
    I haven't learnt any of it yet :/


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    I've got my mock tomorrow on Livy, Cicero and Virgil and wondered if anybody has any good points I could make about Cicero in particular? Thanks


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