Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    hey guys

    i am having a panik attack! it's january and my summer exams are like in 3 months or so i only started revision i am soo scaared i don't know what to do right now!
    have i started revision late? would i be able to cover everything in my specification for alll my subjects in just 3 months? pleasee help am soo scared!!!

    thanks in advance
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by noey123)
    hey guys

    i am having a panik attack! it's january and my summer exams are like in 3 months or so i only started revision i am soo scaared i don't know what to do right now!
    have i started revision late? would i be able to cover everything in my specification for alll my subjects in just 3 months? pleasee help am soo scared!!!

    thanks in advance
    You'll probably find that very few people have started serious revision yet (or any revision at all). You have plenty of time

    First, try and stay calm about it. Sit down and take the time - possibly over a few evenings - to check you have access to all the resources you need for each subject - including good textbooks/revision guides and notes from classes, past papers (either online or a printout). Check nothing is missing from your notes so far (a textbook with a decent contents page comes in handy here - just read through the subheadings). Now is the time to go see your teachers about things you don't understand. Chances are you haven't finished studying most of your courses yet, so obviously there will be some topics you haven't covered. Leave these for now.

    It might help you to start by making revision notes from your class notes and textbooks, in the form of lists/bullet points, mind maps, index cards - whatever is best for you! Try and make them shorter than your original notes (particularly handy for taking them with you to revise in college or something), but don't miss out anything really important!

    It varies by subject, but past paper questions are usually a really really good way to revise. Look at how many past papers you have access to, and how long you have until the exam - you don't want to use them up too fast! There will also be practice questions in textbooks that you can use. Try and do as much as possible without looking in your notes for answers - it's probably best to have a quick go through all the unit content before trying an exam paper if you haven't for a while. Once again, if you haven't finished the unit you can't try a whole paper yet!

    Find time that you can revise in each week - convenient free lesson in college, evenings/weekend time. Try and set a minimum amount that you want to get done each week - don't overstretch yourself with it and end up creating more stress though, exams are still a fair way away. You can always do more than the minimum, but an unreachable target isn't going to help! It might help to start by doing a little each week (30 minutes a night, or a few hours a week) and then building up to more revision closer to the time.

    Final tips:
    • Try and keep some balance between subjects - don't ignore one because you struggle with it, but don't spend all your time on the thing you find hardest either.
    • If you're one of those people (like me!) who leaves their homework until the last minute or spends the bare minimum time possible on it, start sitting down and doing it in advance, with no distractions and putting the proper amount of effort into it. You might find it helps!
    • Make sure you do some papers under timed exam conditions.
    • Mark things within a day or two of doing them so that you can remember what you were thinking when you answered them.
    • Take some time to relax at least once a week (but don't neglect your revision too much!)
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Lau14)
    You'll probably find that very few people have started serious revision yet (or any revision at all). You have plenty of time

    First, try and stay calm about it. Sit down and take the time - possibly over a few evenings - to check you have access to all the resources you need for each subject - including good textbooks/revision guides and notes from classes, past papers (either online or a printout). Check nothing is missing from your notes so far (a textbook with a decent contents page comes in handy here - just read through the subheadings). Now is the time to go see your teachers about things you don't understand. Chances are you haven't finished studying most of your courses yet, so obviously there will be some topics you haven't covered. Leave these for now.

    It might help you to start by making revision notes from your class notes and textbooks, in the form of lists/bullet points, mind maps, index cards - whatever is best for you! Try and make them shorter than your original notes (particularly handy for taking them with you to revise in college or something), but don't miss out anything really important!

    It varies by subject, but past paper questions are usually a really really good way to revise. Look at how many past papers you have access to, and how long you have until the exam - you don't want to use them up too fast! There will also be practice questions in textbooks that you can use. Try and do as much as possible without looking in your notes for answers - it's probably best to have a quick go through all the unit content before trying an exam paper if you haven't for a while. Once again, if you haven't finished the unit you can't try a whole paper yet!

    Find time that you can revise in each week - convenient free lesson in college, evenings/weekend time. Try and set a minimum amount that you want to get done each week - don't overstretch yourself with it and end up creating more stress though, exams are still a fair way away. You can always do more than the minimum, but an unreachable target isn't going to help! It might help to start by doing a little each week (30 minutes a night, or a few hours a week) and then building up to more revision closer to the time.

    Final tips:
    • Try and keep some balance between subjects - don't ignore one because you struggle with it, but don't spend all your time on the thing you find hardest either.
    • If you're one of those people (like me!) who leaves their homework until the last minute or spends the bare minimum time possible on it, start sitting down and doing it in advance, with no distractions and putting the proper amount of effort into it. You might find it helps!
    • Make sure you do some papers under timed exam conditions.
    • Mark things within a day or two of doing them so that you can remember what you were thinking when you answered them.
    • Take some time to relax at least once a week (but don't neglect your revision too much!)
    thank you!
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Brexit voters: Do you stand by your vote?
    Help with your A-levels

    All the essentials

    The adventure begins mug

    Student life: what to expect

    What it's really like going to uni

    Rosette

    Essay expert

    Learn to write like a pro with our ultimate essay guide.

    Uni match

    Uni match

    Our tool will help you find the perfect course for you

    Study planner

    Create a study plan

    Get your head around what you need to do and when with the study planner tool.

    Study planner

    Resources by subject

    Everything from mind maps to class notes.

    Hands typing

    Degrees without fees

    Discover more about degree-level apprenticeships.

    A student doing homework

    Study tips from A* students

    Students who got top grades in their A-levels share their secrets

    Study help links and info

    Can you help? Study help unanswered threadsRules and posting guidelines

    Sponsored content:

    HEAR

    HEAR

    Find out how a Higher Education Achievement Report can help you prove your achievements.

    Groups associated with this forum:

    View associated groups
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Write a reply...
    Reply
    Hide
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.