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What could I go on to do with a masters in education? watch

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    I have a talk about starting the masters in education in september part time, so would take 3 years to complete along side me working. Could this open up more job opportunities for me?
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    Sounds a bit basic, but it depends on your surrent situation. I think we need a bit more info.

    If you're already teaching, then you need to look at the job opportunities and talk to people familiar with the profession.

    If you're not in teaching and want to get into it, then the Masters should help.
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    The reason I ask is because alot of people have said a masters degree is pointless. My friend graduated with a masters degree in psychology last year with also a good honours degree yet still hasnt managed to secure a job in that profession or further education. I just worry, I dont want to waste my time, but I still do feel it would benefit me, I hope so. I think it would make me more specialised maybe, I dont know. The programme leader will be biased so theres no point asking if its worthwhile to them
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    Are you already a teacher?
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    (Original post by trifleontoast)
    The reason I ask is because alot of people have said a masters degree is pointless. My friend graduated with a masters degree in psychology last year with also a good honours degree yet still hasnt managed to secure a job in that profession or further education. I just worry, I dont want to waste my time, but I still do feel it would benefit me, I hope so. I think it would make me more specialised maybe, I dont know. The programme leader will be biased so theres no point asking if its worthwhile to them
    "My friend graduated with a masters degree in psychology last year with also a good honours degree yet still hasnt managed to secure a job in that profession or further education. "

    Umm, it's not liek you can just teach if you have a masters and no teaching experience / credentials. The point of a masters in education is so that you can teach whatever subject you'd like at a secondary level. If your friend did a masters in psychology, it's not like secondary schools are lining up to hire him or her. She needs experience.

    I'm on a similar boat. I have a degree in lit, and right now I'm a part time teacher. I'm hoping to get my masters in lit, but that doesn't mean I'll be qualified to teach. My best hope is to get employed at a private school that does not require teaching qualifications as do state-run schools. :P

    If you're getting a masters in education (vs a masters in something else), yes your teaching opportunities will be in abundance. Especially in Asia.
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    (Original post by Klix88)
    Are you already a teacher?
    Im currently training to be an Early Years Teacher, I will be finished in July (fingers crossed). Its a new qualification. Equivalent to a teacher, but not. If you want to have a look at it on the dfe. Its equivalent to qts but is not qts, it is EYTS.



    (Original post by katabasis)
    "My friend graduated with a masters degree in psychology last year with also a good honours degree yet still hasnt managed to secure a job in that profession or further education. "

    Umm, it's not liek you can just teach if you have a masters and no teaching experience / credentials. The point of a masters in education is so that you can teach whatever subject you'd like at a secondary level. If your friend did a masters in psychology, it's not like secondary schools are lining up to hire him or her. She needs experience.

    I'm on a similar boat. I have a degree in lit, and right now I'm a part time teacher. I'm hoping to get my masters in lit, but that doesn't mean I'll be qualified to teach. My best hope is to get employed at a private school that does not require teaching qualifications as do state-run schools. :P

    If you're getting a masters in education (vs a masters in something else), yes your teaching opportunities will be in abundance. Especially in Asia.
    I want to specialise in it further so a masters would help that. I also want to pursue QTS as I can apply for private schools like you talk about but its much more difficult.

    What do you mean they will be in abundance especially in Asia? Do they view a masters in education really highly?
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    (Original post by trifleontoast)
    Im currently training to be an Early Years Teacher, I will be finished in July (fingers crossed). Its a new qualification. Equivalent to a teacher, but not. If you want to have a look at it on the dfe. Its equivalent to qts but is not qts, it is EYTS.





    I want to specialise in it further so a masters would help that. I also want to pursue QTS as I can apply for private schools like you talk about but its much more difficult.

    What do you mean they will be in abundance especially in Asia? Do they view a masters in education really highly?
    Well, there's no shortage of teacher jobs in Asia...duh! If you have a masters in education, you can even get the Hong Kong government to give you an approximately GBP 2,000.00 living stipend. It's like... hello? Have you ever hard about teaching in Asia? It's pretty much the only place you'll really make money. If you can land a job at an international school teaching IGCSE or IB, you'll make hella bank.

    If you want to do primary, a masters increases your asking salary, obviously. There are many paths to becoming a teacher, but getting a masters in education is a simplest way to just land a good job. Getting a masters in something else will be tricky unless you have experience, other qualifications, or go for a private school.
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    (Original post by katabasis)
    Well, there's no shortage of teacher jobs in Asia...duh! If you have a masters in education, you can even get the Hong Kong government to give you an approximately GBP 2,000.00 living stipend. It's like... hello? Have you ever hard about teaching in Asia? It's pretty much the only place you'll really make money. If you can land a job at an international school teaching IGCSE or IB, you'll make hella bank.

    If you want to do primary, a masters increases your asking salary, obviously. There are many paths to becoming a teacher, but getting a masters in education is a simplest way to just land a good job. Getting a masters in something else will be tricky unless you have experience, other qualifications, or go for a private school.
    Thanks, I will see what the programme leader says tomorrow, but its something I definitely want to do, I think it would help me gain qts too. I have experience in education so thats the only masters I would pursue. I will have a look at teaching in asia haha it sounds somewhat appealing!
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    (Original post by trifleontoast)
    Thanks, I will see what the programme leader says tomorrow, but its something I definitely want to do, I think it would help me gain qts too. I have experience in education so thats the only masters I would pursue. I will have a look at teaching in asia haha it sounds somewhat appealing!
    Look at the Hong Kong Native English Teacher program. Also, look into Singapore, Korea, and mainland China. A lot of the times the schools will help you acquire your teaching qualifications should you need to. These are places with money.

    Also, middle east is a big hub for education, but obviously it's harder to integrate culturally.

    If you're looking for more of a chillaxed atmosphere, Thailand, Vietnam, and Indonesia provide a decent livable salary and package, good travel opportunities, but you won't be crying to the bank.

    South America can be hit or miss - there are a lot of schools that need teachers, but only a few of them are ridiculously rich. That being said... it's South America.
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    Hello

    A masters in Education will give you the ability to teach in a wider field, however you will need to gain a Postgraduate Certificate in Education or equivalent to grant you Qualified Teaching Status, which will help you to teach in classes, so do make sure the course you are looking at does provide this.

    If you would like any more information then do let me know!

    - Matt
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    (Original post by De Montfort University)
    Hello

    A masters in Education will give you the ability to teach in a wider field, however you will need to gain a Postgraduate Certificate in Education or equivalent to grant you Qualified Teaching Status, which will help you to teach in classes, so do make sure the course you are looking at does provide this.

    If you would like any more information then do let me know!

    - Matt
    Thanks, yeah I want to gain QTS at some point but after the masters degree I think
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    (Original post by trifleontoast)
    I have a talk about starting the masters in education in september part time, so would take 3 years to complete along side me working. Could this open up more job opportunities for me?
    I really wouldn't.

    As you've said you want to gain QTS, I'd think it would be wiser to do that first. It will definitely open up more job opportunities to you than EYTS plus a masters.

    It's also worth noting that Masters in Education can have a very high drop-out rate (lots of students find that it is incredibly difficult to study alongside a full time teaching job and so leave after one year with a Postgraduate Certificate or two years with a Postgraduate Diploma). If you attend the talk tomorrow, ask the specific question 'how many people who start the course actually go on to finish it' - you'll be surprised by the answer.

    Do be a bit cynical as well, the university is obviously trying to recruit people to fill up the spaces on their Masters course, so they might make it sound more useful than it actually is!
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    (Original post by Jantaculum)
    I really wouldn't.

    As you've said you want to gain QTS, I'd think it would be wiser to do that first. It will definitely open up more job opportunities to you than EYTS plus a masters.

    It's also worth noting that Masters in Education can have a very high drop-out rate (lots of students find that it is incredibly difficult to study alongside a full time teaching job and so leave after one year with a Postgraduate Certificate or two years with a Postgraduate Diploma). If you attend the talk tomorrow, ask the specific question 'how many people who start the course actually go on to finish it' - you'll be surprised by the answer.

    Do be a bit cynical as well, the university is obviously trying to recruit people to fill up the spaces on their Masters course, so they might make it sound more useful than it actually is!

    EYTS is more like childcare than teaching so doing something part time whilst working will be challenging but not as tough as someone teaching primary and then having to go and study I guess. But I do hear you and these are my exact worries.
    I wouldnt be aiming for the full masters I would reevaluate after the first year after I had got the postgrad certificate. We can get 20 masters credits from the training we are doing so that's why I am eager aswell.
    I really want to start working properly for the first time from September when I finish this academic but I really want to study part time either a masters in education which is what I know more familiar to me or apply for a pgdip in careers guidance. I don't know what to do
 
 
 
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