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    For such a competitive degree I hear too many stories from others of Doctors (GPs) being inadequate.

    For me, I have a family member that had to go to the GP several times before they actual got a referral to a specialist.

    A friend of mine had problems and was just constantly assured that the problems were 'normal'. She eventually went to another GP and the woman was able to sort it out.

    I find that if I'm in need to go to get a check up, I go through to a hospital as service is almost always better. I haven't seen my GP in years, every time I go he's always on holiday?

    I've lost faith in going to the doctors, is it just me?
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    what do you mean you go to hospital for a check up? you mean like a+e?
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    Oddly enough, it seems as though the majority of people who are dissatisfied with their GPs belong to the population of the 'worried well'. These are people who present with niggles here and there which are insignificant in the grand scheme of things. These are niggles with no targetable medical focus and therefore have no appropriate intervention that the GP can offer.

    A phenomena that I find really strange is that the worried well don't like being told that there is nothing wrong with them. This is really bizzare as this is essentially the best news a doctor can ever give you. But, on the otherhand, it typically means that the niggle goes unexplained and un'treated'. But a negative bodily sensation does not always = a symptom and does not always = a disease. Sometimes perfectly healthy people get dizzy, they get pain, they get weird tingling, they get nausea. It's called being a living human being.

    When these patients are told that the doctor can't find anything wrong, they feel angry, cheated and often leave the surgery still believing that there is 'something wrong'. They then go doctor shopping until they find one that will give them a prescription, any prescription, in order to seek confirmation of their belief. They then go "Ha, I knew it! There WAS something wrong!". Inevitably their niggle self-limits or resolves spontaneously/placebo which adds further fuel to the dissatisfied fire. They then go and tell all their worried well friends and encourage them to never take no for an answer. Often this is backed up by nonsense phrases like "only you know your body".

    However, I have to preemptively state that this is gravely different to those patients who DO have diagnoses missed, only for it to rear its head acutely later on. Unfortunately, medicine is not an exact science, diseases can be insidious, misleading and unpredictable. Conversely, investigating EVERY possibility can be dangerous. This is the nature of medicine. This is then different again from those patients with clear disease but are unfortunately not interviewed/examined/investigated in full despite clear indications - hopefully a rare situation which should indeed brew more than dissatisfaction.

    Cue the endless quotes of 'oh my auntys friend had xyz but saw her GP 10 years before in the supermarket and he didn't diagnose her with his x-ray eyes, the NHS should be banned'.
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    (Original post by Etomidate)
    Cue the endless quotes of 'oh my auntys friend had xyz but saw her GP 10 years before in the supermarket and he didn't diagnose her with his x-ray eyes, the NHS should be banned'.
    Funny you should say that because my aunt had a rare disease called xyz but the GP could have saved her with his X ray eyes but didn't!
    In all honesty though I think the solution with the worried Wells symptoms is just to monitor them over a period of time, wait and see if anything changes and do all the necessary screenings/tests to make sure they don't actually have something wrong with them
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    It's not just you. My parents took me to the go numerous times as a child because I'd wake up having just vomited. Apparently there was nothing wrong with me and my parents were imagining it.

    I had to beg to have tests done, a referral and my medication changed. I've been told that I'm imagining all the pain because it can't be seen on the mri. Now, I'm not a doctor, but since when could you see pain on a scan?

    And then there was the doctor who prescribed me double the medication he should have done. The first nurse hadn't picked up on this and I was asked by the second why I taking so much. I was told to and not having a clue about asthma medication, wasn't going to question him.
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    (Original post by OU Student)
    It's not just you. My parents took me to the go numerous times as a child because I'd wake up having just vomited. Apparently there was nothing wrong with me and my parents were imagining it.

    I had to beg to have tests done, a referral and my medication changed. I've been told that I'm imagining all the pain because it can't be seen on the mri. Now, I'm not a doctor, but since when could you see pain on a scan?

    And then there was the doctor who prescribed me double the medication he should have done. The first nurse hadn't picked up on this and I was asked by the second why I taking so much. I was told to and not having a clue about asthma medication, wasn't going to question him.
    I think for a doctor to deny someone's symptoms is (generally) unfair, and is probably an artefact of the older generation of doctors one would hope. These days, if a patient says they're in pain, they're in pain. Nobody should be told that they're 'imagining' the pain. Can psychology cause pain? Absolutely. But psychological pain is still pain.

    In regards to seeing pain on a scan: No, but radiologists are pretty damn good at diagnosing anatomical causes of pain, and signs of pathophysiological processes that cause pain. A clear scan shouldn't translate that you have no pain, but it can leave you in a situation where you have less options with regards to treating the pain.

    The idea of patients demanding specific scans or investigations makes me very uncomfortable. Doctors need to be very considered when it comes to investigating a patient. They need to have an idea what they're looking for and what they expect to see before they get the results.

    The disctinction between normal and abnormal is essentially a statistical one and can be equivocal therefore necessitating further, potentially more invasive/dangerous, tests. Subsequently, if the initial test was the result of patient demands and not sensible clinical suspicion, the patient may result in harm as a concequence of over-investigation or over-diagnosis of incidentalomas.
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    (Original post by Etomidate)
    I think for a doctor to deny someone's symptoms is (generally) unfair, and is probably an artefact of the older generation of doctors one would hope. These days, if a patient says they're in pain, they're in pain. Nobody should be told that they're 'imagining' the pain. Can psychology cause pain? Absolutely. But psychological pain is still pain.

    In regards to seeing pain on a scan: No, but radiologists are pretty damn good at diagnosing anatomical causes of pain, and signs of pathophysiological processes that cause pain. A clear scan shouldn't translate that you have no pain, but it can leave you in a situation where you have less options with regards to treating the pain.

    The idea of patients demanding specific scans or investigations makes me very uncomfortable. Doctors need to be very considered when it comes to investigating a patient. They need to have an idea what they're looking for and what they expect to see before they get the results.

    The disctinction between normal and abnormal is essentially a statistical one and can be equivocal therefore necessitating further, potentially more invasive/dangerous, tests. Subsequently, if the initial test was the result of patient demands and not sensible clinical suspicion, the patient may result in harm as a concequence of over-investigation or over-diagnosis of incidentalomas.
    I had done research and had contacted a charity. I wasn't simply asking for a random test. Instead, they'd just ignored the original diagnosis, diagnosed something I don't have and as a result, gave the wrong treatment.
 
 
 
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