Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    4
    ReputationRep:
    Nigel Farage is a good bloke and often quite funny but he is not setting the best health example by constantly being pictured smoking and with a pint in his hand, and impersonating cigar smoking to highlight objects. It's not good to represent the country as a constant addition to legal substances. His PR people should address this.




    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    He's seen with a drink, but not drunk. That is a good role model. Unlike some politicians.

    He does not appear to be overweight. Unlike some politicians.

    He seems to be vary active in his life, so the boozing and smoking do not appear to be holding him back.


    Given the number of heavily discounted bars in the Houses of Parliament (and do they still have a Smoking Bar indoors?), he is at least being honest.

    If anything, what he is doing is showing he is not a hypocrite, whereas most of the self-serving, lying toe-rag politicians would have us think they are perfect at all times.
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    Bloody drug addicts, weak willed scum bags.1!!!!1111
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    I don't agree with him on a whole lot but honestly who cares about this?
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    Nobody really cares as lots of politicians are like this.

    If he is trying to cultivate it as part of a 'man of the people' image though it looks a bit try-hard. Like he does seem to make a big thing about the fact he likes real ale and whatever - which is cool but can easily be overplayed.

    The key thing for Nigel Farage in terms of his personal image, if he wants to appeal to a wider range of voters, is to avoid becoming more and more a caricature of himself. He has won appeal from a certain part of the electorate that wants somebody that seems a bit non-politically correct, quite blokey, a bit eccentric but in a charming way. But the parts that he hasn't yet reached are looking for other things and the risk for Farage is a lot of the people that don't support him actively resent him and he's not in the market for their votes.

    I think Farage has got a lot of personal strengths compared to the other party leaders, he is at ease with the media, he has a good sense of humour, comes across as straight talking and doesn't tend to patronise people. He's better than the other main party leaders at all of this. Although I disagree with him on pretty much every political issue I can imagine if I met him I'd be able to have a chat with him and he would be good company and wouldn't be arsey with me about not agreeing with his politics. I would probably feel awkward with Cameron, Miliband or Clegg but Farage yes I could imagine having a relaxed chat with, probably not about politics. I think he has natural charm and this should be something he uses as a main strength at the election.

    But recently I have wondered if he is trying too hard to personify "UKIP man", ie he's being more edgy and controversial and playing to people that are already UKIP voters. He's also sticking to 'safe' territory - making statements about immigration, eg winter crisis in A&E, health service in the news, Nigel Farage comes up and says "doctors should speak good English and we'll send out the ones that can't". This is a classic caricature statement - it will sound like 'common sense' to his existing supporters but this isn't the key issue in the challenges to health provision, and people that don't already support UKIP and aren't obsessed about immigration will just switch off to Farage as somebody who doesn't offer proper solutions.

    I think its an issue with UKIP candidates/supporters in general - they don't engage well in wider political debate, they like to shout from the sidelines and continually bring everything down to immigration and angry rants about Labour/leftists/feminists/cultural Marxism and whatever but this is talking about the type of debate that only one section of the electorate cares about: several of the parties that they hate (Labour, SNP, Lib Dems) are actually at least engaging in the debate the rest of the country wants to have and they may well be the ones that end forming a government with UKIP continuing to just say the same things for the next five years from the sidelines.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by MagicNMedicine)
    But recently I have wondered if he is trying too hard to personify "UKIP man", ie he's being more edgy and controversial and playing to people that are already UKIP voters. He's also sticking to 'safe' territory - making statements about immigration, eg winter crisis in A&E, health service in the news, Nigel Farage comes up and says "doctors should speak good English and we'll send out the ones that can't". This is a classic caricature statement - it will sound like 'common sense' to his existing supporters but this isn't the key issue in the challenges to health provision, and people that don't already support UKIP and aren't obsessed about immigration will just switch off to Farage as somebody who doesn't offer proper solutions.
    I would disagree. I saw a complete turn in UKIP since the European elections, or just before. It was an exercise in completely flipping their image from neoconservative libertarians to capturing the Liberal vote. The whole party backpedaled on immigration, began to accept the diluted meaning of being British and the NHS stuff, that made the hardcore Farage/UKIP supporters think twice. The ones who care to rid the country of the vices of Marxist thought, for example, really don't see UKIP as anything more than a key out of the EU.

    tl;dr, Farage has turned 360º and walked away from his own core voters in favour of trying to please all.
    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    I think he's hamming it at this point but his rejection of the ideology that the only worthwhile goal in life is to maximise its length used to be endearing.
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    I think there's something to be said for him smoking and drinking in public, unlike the PM and Nick Clegg who are apparently still on-off smokers and yet would probably go to extraordinary lengths not to be photographed doing it.
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by MKultra101)
    Nigel Farage is a good bloke and often quite funny but he is not setting the best health example by constantly being pictured smoking and with a pint in his hand, and impersonating cigar smoking to highlight objects. It's not good to represent the country as a constant addition to legal substances. His PR people should address this.




    Posted from TSR Mobile
    So we should try and ignore how much of a smoker and boozer Churchill was?

    Who looks at a politician for their example of health anyway?
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    I won't be impressed with him until he smokes crack on Newsnight.
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
TSR Support Team

We have a brilliant team of more than 60 Support Team members looking after discussions on The Student Room, helping to make it a fun, safe and useful place to hang out.

Updated: January 24, 2015
Poll
Do you agree with the PM's proposal to cut tuition fees for some courses?
Useful resources

Groups associated with this forum:

View associated groups

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.