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    I got very high A-Level grades and went to a highly respected University for a Maths/ Stats/ Economics degree. I didn't enjoy it and ended up scraping a 2:2.

    For the past 6 months, I've been in a limbo. I have no career plans, I have no passions, I just at this point want a decent job. I've been applying for IT roles because I enjoy technology and using computers and such- very vague and broad, I know, but it's something. I think it would be an environment that I would fit in best and have a decent time of things. I also did a Programming module at University and enjoyed that, so I've been applying to entry level programming roles that provide training.

    I'm not having problems getting interviews. Recruiters are interested in me and will call back sometimes after applying to jobs. However, what I am now aware of after suffering two rejections in the past hour is the reason why I'm not getting past the interview stage- because I lack passion.

    The big problem with this is two-fold. The first is obvious- I lack passion and there's nothing that can be done about this. You have it or you don't. You're expected by now to know what you want to do and I just don't have it.

    The second problem is that I can't lie about it- I am a very genuine and honest person (something you'd think would be a positive, but I guess not) and I can't lie to any real extent. I'm effectively lying in every interview, since I can't tell them the real reasons I applied and I have to push things further than are true.

    I feel like all my efforts right now are in vain. I can see the problem but no way to fix it. I'm asking for advice on this problem. Maybe there's some careers that I didn't know existed. Maybe there's some decent place that will take you on aptitude alone, some place that wants ability and cares little for 'passion'. I'm not a salesperson, I'm just someone with a decent brain on me who should be very employable but nobody wants.

    I'm reaching the end of my tether and I'm hoping someone here can say something of value to help me. Please do.
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    TSR Support Team
    (Original post by vibeo)
    The big problem with this is two-fold. The first is obvious- I lack passion and there's nothing that can be done about this. You have it or you don't. You're expected by now to know what you want to do and I just don't have it.

    The second problem is that I can't lie about it- I am a very genuine and honest person (something you'd think would be a positive, but I guess not) and I can't lie to any real extent. I'm effectively lying in every interview, since I can't tell them the real reasons I applied and I have to push things further than are true.
    All you have to do is say something along the lines of... you want to settle in to a role for the long term with a well known and reputable company, and that the job description seemed like a perfect fit for your skillset. E.g if the job involves dealing with clients/customers then just give an example of customer service, or if it involves lots of analysis/IT systems just say that you pick things up quickly and like a challenge, and again give an example. It's not even lying.

    Make sure you've researched the company you're applying for too, having a bit of background knowledge will put you at an advantage. Ask plenty of questions as well to show you're interested, I always try to aim for 5. Eg how is performance evaluated, what opportunities are there for progression, what sort of team would I be working in.

    I don't have a ****ing clue what I want to do with my life, but this approach works for me.
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    (Original post by sr90)
    All you have to do is say something along the lines of... you want to settle in to a role for the long term with a well known and reputable company, and that the job description seemed like a perfect fit for your skillset. E.g if the job involves dealing with clients/customers then just give an example of customer service, or if it involves lots of analysis/IT systems just say that you pick things up quickly and like a challenge, and again give an example. It's not even lying.

    Make sure you've researched the company you're applying for too, having a bit of background knowledge will put you at an advantage. Ask plenty of questions as well to show you're interested, I always try to aim for 5. Eg how is performance evaluated, what opportunities are there for progression, what sort of team would I be working in.

    I don't have a ****ing clue what I want to do with my life, but this approach works for me.
    Thanks for the advice. I've been doing a lot of preparation on companies for interviews but the past few interviews, they haven't asked me and have rather told me instead, which was a bit annoying since that's what I put almost all the prep time towards.

    I think it's a good idea to express to them more precisely why I think I would be good at the job. Maybe it's just a case of talking more, even if it is mostly unrelated to the topic and is me giving examples of why I'm so wonderful and perfect for them. Ugh. :/
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    I really would have appreciated some more advice. In applying for coding roles, I'm finding that they only want people who are passionate about it, and it will take a lot of work on my part to get my coding abilities to a point where someone might consider hiring me. I just want a job. Please don't tell me that my A-Level and degree are useless..
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    I've been through a lot of the interviews for programming jobs this year, ultimately the main thing that has landed me interviews is the experience on my CV but what landed me the offers was displaying a strong passion and strong technical knowledge.
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    (Original post by TheSilentBang)
    I've been through a lot of the interviews for programming jobs this year, ultimately the main thing that has landed me interviews is the experience on my CV but what landed me the offers was displaying a strong passion and strong technical knowledge.
    Well, thanks for confirming that it's useless for me to apply to the programming jobs now.

    What the **** was all that time spent proving myself in school for? Why was so much importance placed on it all when it counts for nothing?
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    Well, don't be afraid of hard work. go learn and improve your coding skills right now. You will find yourself talking about yourself more if you do something related in programming and say in your spare time, you are passionate and learn language A to do this, B to do that etc and give a clear example.
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    (Original post by vibeo)
    Well, thanks for confirming that it's useless for me to apply to the programming jobs now.

    What the **** was all that time spent proving myself in school for? Why was so much importance placed on it all when it counts for nothing?
    You're welcome?
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    Try the finance industry! If you have no passion but are capable of making the numbers, you'll fit in perfectly.
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    (Original post by swagbrahx69)
    Try the finance industry! If you have no passion but are capable of making the numbers, you'll fit in perfectly.
    I'm wondering if they'll mind that I didn't do any finance modules at Uni... I'm extremely ignorant of finance industry. I don't know if it's easy to get into but sure, my degree should help anyway.
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    OP,

    Coding isnt an easy gig, and i think companies want to make sure they hire people who will stick at it (hence their focus on passion).

    I think you'll need to show them what you've been doing that suggests you wish to get into coding.

    For example, using online resources to learn a new language. That type of stuff will impress them and will display a passion.

    MY advice is to go out there and research what types of languages are hot right now, and start developing those skills in your own time. It doesnt mean you have to get great at it - but it will show you've already embarked on learning about programming theories etc.

    Don't lose hope - rejection is common. It takes a while before you get accepted it. Determination is another great trait
 
 
 
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