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    I'm in my first year of unit studying primary education. Since November, I've been having fairly frequent panic attacks, some of them quite severe so that I cannot continue with whatever I was doing. There appear to be no triggers so nothing I can avoid really. My doctor prescribed me Propranolol and recently increased the dose. It really has improved, I used to have a bad attack almost everyday, now I'm down to maybe 3 small ones and 1 bad one a week, so although it's a vast improvement, its not quite sorted. I am also waiting to get CBT sessions at unit, so hopefully it will be sorted soon.

    So far, I've had two panic attacks during my placements at a primary school, again with no obvious triggers. In a PDR meeting yesterday, my mentor and tutor said that if they aren't convinced that my panic attacks have stopped, then they might have to suspend me, because I shouldn't be around the children, and what if I was on my own with the class?

    Obviously I completely understand that the children should not see me distressed, but it does not get to that point. If it is a mild attack, then I can disguise it if I distract myself with something (lets face it, there's always something to do in a classroom!). If it's a bad attack, then I remove myself from the room before it builds up too much. So I do understand that it may be difficult for me to complete placement tasks, for example, if I were to have one whilst being observed.

    However, as far as I am aware, I should not be left alone with a class (for my course at least). So I thought this should not be an issue, really. If this was an actual teaching job then yes, I see where they are coming from, but I won't be alone with pupils while I'm still a student.

    Speaking to other students, they also seemed to this this was unnecessarily harsh. Am I wrong to think suspension due to panic attacks is a little extreme? This is suspension from the university course, not just my placement. What about teachers who have asthma attacks? Or IBS? Or any other condition where they may suddenly need to leave the classroom? Obviously I understand that panic attacks aren't the same as these, but they all involve the adult leaving the classroom without much warning.

    I really don't want to get suspended, has anyone been in a similar situation?
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    (Original post by jessybean)
    I really don't want to get suspended, has anyone been in a similar situation?
    You should be getting advice from your Union.
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    (Original post by jessybean)
    I'm in my first year of unit studying primary education. Since November, I've been having fairly frequent panic attacks, some of them quite severe so that I cannot continue with whatever I was doing. There appear to be no triggers so nothing I can avoid really. My doctor prescribed me Propranolol and recently increased the dose. It really has improved, I used to have a bad attack almost everyday, now I'm down to maybe 3 small ones and 1 bad one a week, so although it's a vast improvement, its not quite sorted. I am also waiting to get CBT sessions at unit, so hopefully it will be sorted soon.

    So far, I've had two panic attacks during my placements at a primary school, again with no obvious triggers. In a PDR meeting yesterday, my mentor and tutor said that if they aren't convinced that my panic attacks have stopped, then they might have to suspend me, because I shouldn't be around the children, and what if I was on my own with the class?

    Obviously I completely understand that the children should not see me distressed, but it does not get to that point. If it is a mild attack, then I can disguise it if I distract myself with something (lets face it, there's always something to do in a classroom!). If it's a bad attack, then I remove myself from the room before it builds up too much. So I do understand that it may be difficult for me to complete placement tasks, for example, if I were to have one whilst being observed.

    However, as far as I am aware, I should not be left alone with a class (for my course at least). So I thought this should not be an issue, really. If this was an actual teaching job then yes, I see where they are coming from, but I won't be alone with pupils while I'm still a student.

    Speaking to other students, they also seemed to this this was unnecessarily harsh. Am I wrong to think suspension due to panic attacks is a little extreme? This is suspension from the university course, not just my placement. What about teachers who have asthma attacks? Or IBS? Or any other condition where they may suddenly need to leave the classroom? Obviously I understand that panic attacks aren't the same as these, but they all involve the adult leaving the classroom without much warning.

    I really don't want to get suspended, has anyone been in a similar situation?
    If you won't be able to stay with kids on your own as a teacher what's the point in spending money doing a primary education course?
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    (Original post by Juichiro)
    If you won't be able to stay with kids on your own as a teacher what's the point in spending money doing a primary education course?
    I don't think she really wants to give up on everything she's worked for and wants to do just because she's started having panic attacks
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    My girlfriend is In a similar situation. The university have threatened to suspend her because she suffers from seseizures, so can relate to what you're going through.
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    (Original post by Guitarded)
    I don't think she really wants to give up on everything she's worked for and wants to do just because she's started having panic attacks
    Unlike you, I don't know how much she has worked to get in the course so I can't comment on that. But if she is going to do a course leading to a teacher qualification, it makes sense that she is mentally and physically fit for the role.

    It is not "just because x". OP said the attacks are/were quite severe. And it is only due to heavy doses of the drug she got prescribed by her doctor that she can cope. If teaching is indeed a high stress proffession, will she have to overdose to keep up with the work?

    OP should re-evaluate her goals now that she still has a chance rather than ignore what seems to be a serious problem that is only being "patched" by drugs.
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    (Original post by Juichiro)
    Unlike you, I don't know how much she has worked to get in the course so I can't comment on that. But if she is going to do a course leading to a teacher qualification, it makes sense that she is mentally and physically fit for the role.

    It is not "just because x". OP said the attacks are/were quite severe. And it is only due to heavy doses of the drug she got prescribed by her doctor that she can cope. If teaching is indeed a high stress proffession, will she have to overdose to keep up with the work?

    OP should re-evaluate her goals now that she still has a chance rather than ignore what seems to be a serious problem that is only being "patched" by drugs.
    I have incredibly severe migraines, which often stop me from doing anything. they are called hemiplegic migraines, which cause partial paralysis of one side of the body, It can be as bad as just painful pins and needles in my arms, legs and face in a mild one, or I can loose all feeling and sense in my arms, legs and face, as well as my sight, speech and ability to stand up.

    This has never EVER stopped me from achieving anything. I used to have a mild one pretty much once every couple of days and a bad one maybe once every 2 weeks, with mild ones lasting maybe 4 hours-6 hours and bad ones 2-3 days.

    I am now on better medication and I dont have any at all for months on end, it really does get better.

    my advice to OP is to not give up on your dream, but to understand that to get there you may need to look into this further. and try and possibly get them to a less frequent state, Its not going to be easy and it took me years, but Im sure with perseverance it will all work out in the end.

    do not give up on your dream to become a teacher, my mum has regular panic attacks like you and whenever she had one (when she was a teaching assistant or worked in a care home) she would just keep herself busy with smaller tasks and alert others so they would understand, it is do able!!

    good luck
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    (Original post by Natalierm2707)
    I have incredibly severe migraines, which often stop me from doing anything. they are called hemiplegic migraines, which cause partial paralysis of one side of the body, It can be as bad as just painful pins and needles in my arms, legs and face in a mild one, or I can loose all feeling and sense in my arms, legs and face, as well as my sight, speech and ability to stand up.

    This has never EVER stopped me from achieving anything. I used to have a mild one pretty much once every couple of days and a bad one maybe once every 2 weeks, with mild ones lasting maybe 4 hours-6 hours and bad ones 2-3 days.

    I am now on better medication and I dont have any at all for months on end, it really does get better.

    my advice to OP is to not give up on your dream, but to understand that to get there you may need to look into this further. and try and possibly get them to a less frequent state, Its not going to be easy and it took me years, but Im sure with perseverance it will all work out in the end.

    do not give up on your dream to become a teacher, my mum has regular panic attacks like you and whenever she had one (when she was a teaching assistant or worked in a care home) she would just keep herself busy with smaller tasks and alert others so they would understand, it is do able!!

    good luck
    We are not talking about the 95% of the time when you are fine. We are talking about the 5% when you are not. If something happens in that 5% and you were responsible, it would destroy your reputation and worst case a third party could end up harmed.
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    Its only been something that started recently. My GP and unit think that the CBT will help and mean I don't need medication (or at least not strong medication). The propranolol isn't all that strong, I was started on a very mild dose, to see if it had any effect on the frequency/severity of them (I'm assuming this was to check that the type of medication is appropriate). After noticing this positive effect (7+ severe attacks a week decreased to 1 severe and 3 mild), the dose was increased. This change was only last week and I have not had an attack since Sunday.

    My doctor thinks once I finish the CBT, the attacks will have almost or completely stopped. So long term, I don't think it will be an issue, its just staying on the course this year that is presenting the problem.

    Of course, in the event that the problem is not sorted, then yes, I will re-evaluate what my there options in terms of career are, but from the sounds of things, it wont be a long-lasting problem.

    AyGe, if you don't mind me asking, how has your girlfriend approached the issue?
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    (Original post by Juichiro)
    We are not talking about the 95% of the time when you are fine. We are talking about the 5% when you are not. If something happens in that 5% and you were responsible, it would destroy your reputation and worst case a third party could end up harmed.
    As If it would destroy my reputation, sadly my hemiplegic migraines are hereditary, so I have got them passed down from my mother, and yes they can be severe, but In the moment I feel one coming on I make sure I distance myself from any situation which i could possibly cause any problems or harm. No one would get harmed, apart from me.

    Ii seriously cannot stand the fact that some people on here go around slandering people and telling them they are not good enough or are dangerous or cannot achieve things just because they have certain medical issues, this IS NOT how the world works.

    This girl can go on to achieve anything she wants, and become a primary school teacher, I have every faith in her medication, and for people who are sufferers of these medical issues its hurtful for others just to shoot us down, as if it isnt hard enough nowadays to get a job.

    she will not overdose on medication just so she can work, what a silly idea also.

    please If you cant seriously give this girl some useful advice dont say anything at all.
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    (Original post by Juichiro)
    We are not talking about the 95% of the time when you are fine. We are talking about the 5% when you are not. If something happens in that 5% and you were responsible, it would destroy your reputation and worst case a third party could end up harmed.

    Whether I do go into teaching or not will obviously depend on how frequently I have the attacks. If it reduces to one every few months, then I think that could be an acceptable frequency to teach?
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    (Original post by Natalierm2707)
    As If it would destroy my reputation, sadly my 1.hemiplegic migraines are hereditary, so I have got them passed down from my mother, and yes they can be severe, but 2.In the moment I feel one coming on I make sure I distance myself from any situation which i could possibly cause any problems or harm. 3.No one would get harmed, apart from me.

    4.Ii seriously cannot stand the fact that some people on here go around slandering people and telling them they are not good enough or are 5.dangerous or cannot achieve things just because they have certain medical issues, this IS NOT how the world works.

    6.This girl can go on to achieve anything she wants, and become a primary school teacher, I have every faith in her medication, and for people who are sufferers of these medical issues its hurtful for others just to shoot us down, as if it isnt hard enough nowadays to get a job.

    7. she will not overdose on medication just so she can work, what a silly idea also.

    8. please If you cant seriously give this girl some useful advice dont say anything at all.
    1. How is that relevant? The only relevant thing is whether or not you can do the job.

    2. How is that going to work when you are in charge of kids? You can't just leave them alone in the classroom.

    3. You can't say never.

    4. I am not slandering anyone. If you think I am, please provide quotes before making baseless claims and give names.

    5. Again, you have people in charge, thus if you have medical issues the potential danger of your temporary inability to control the class needs to be assessed. This is how the world works. Do you really think having a medical issue won't be a factor when applying for airplane pilot training or any other job where you must be constantly monitoring things to ensure the well-being of other people?

    6. A paragraph full of emotional claims based on nothing but feelings. Unlike you, I know of this girl nothing more than what she posted. All I said is that having medical issues can potentially impact her suitability for a job as a teacher, airplane pilot or any other high stakes job. Sometimes truth or even opinions can be hurtful. That does not mean that truth or opinions cannot be said. Surely, you have learned a thing of two from the Charlie Hebdo incident.

    7. But if her body develops resistance to the drug, she might have to do it if she wants to keep on doing her job. After all, from all we know, the drugs are the only thing keeping her panic attacks at bay. I don't see how that is silly. Bodies can develop resistance to drugs.

    8. I gave what I considered useful advice. Whether or not you consider it useful (on grounds that it is hurtful - rather than on the grounds of reasoning about possible choices for OP) is irrelevant if all you can base your consideration is emotional claims (see points 3 and 6).
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    (Original post by jessybean)
    Whether I do go into teaching or not will obviously depend on how frequently I have the attacks. If it reduces to one every few months, then I think that could be an acceptable frequency to teach?
    Surely that depends how severe those attacks are, how well they can be predicted and how well you can control them without having to call emergency services every time you have an episode. It's like having chemical mix in your hands and knowing that the reaction will happen at some time in the future but not knowing when or how severe it will be.

    Good thing for you is that there is a shortage of teachers, so you are likely to get a place somewhere (especially if you live in a big city) if you can make a strong case to the employer.

    inb4 Natalie says that I am (I presume intentionally) slandering you or throwing hurtful words at you.
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    as harsh as this may seem, suspension until you have the problem under control may be for the best. a teacher must be physically and mentally fit enough to perform their job to the standard expected of them, but there are limits to this.

    i would recommend contacting your union and seeing what they have to say, just be aware that they may agree with the school.
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    Safeguarding the children is the current most important factor in teaching. If the school judges that the issue of having a teacher out of control of the class is sufficiently severe to place the children in danger, which both tutor and mentor seem to be on the point of doing in this case, then the rights of the children will be placed above the rights of the teacher and the action they are proposing to take will be carried out. It won't be a topic on which they can negotiate, otherwise they would be in breach of their duty of care. Once OP is no longer a student, she will be in sole charge of the class and the safeguarding issue becomes very real.
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    (Original post by Juichiro)
    1. How is that relevant? The only relevant thing is whether or not you can do the job.

    2. How is that going to work when you are in charge of kids? You can't just leave them alone in the classroom.

    3. You can't say never.

    4. I am not slandering anyone. If you think I am, please provide quotes before making baseless claims and give names.

    5. Again, you have people in charge, thus if you have medical issues the potential danger of your temporary inability to control the class needs to be assessed. This is how the world works. Do you really think having a medical issue won't be a factor when applying for airplane pilot training or any other job where you must be constantly monitoring things to ensure the well-being of other people?

    6. A paragraph full of emotional claims based on nothing but feelings. Unlike you, I know of this girl nothing more than what she posted. All I said is that having medical issues can potentially impact her suitability for a job as a teacher, airplane pilot or any other high stakes job. Sometimes truth or even opinions can be hurtful. That does not mean that truth or opinions cannot be said. Surely, you have learned a thing of two from the Charlie Hebdo incident.

    7. But if her body develops resistance to the drug, she might have to do it if she wants to keep on doing her job. After all, from all we know, the drugs are the only thing keeping her panic attacks at bay. I don't see how that is silly. Bodies can develop resistance to drugs.

    8. I gave what I considered useful advice. Whether or not you consider it useful (on grounds that it is hurtful - rather than on the grounds of reasoning about possible choices for OP) is irrelevant if all you can base your consideration is emotional claims (see points 3 and 6).
    If all you want to do is pull apart everything I say, good luck to you, you seriously think you know everything about what Ii said, I was trying to explain how I overcame my medical issues and It now never stops me from doing anything.

    Every situation is different but I am just saying there is so much hope, and it shouldnt all be about the negatives, People need hope to get through things, its fine to be honest, but dont shoot down someones dreams. Its like me saying because someone (my auntie is an example) is paralysed they cant climb up the stairs, fine it sounds so stupid and impossible (but my auntie did every time without help), everything is possible when you try.

    If all you care about is pulling everyone on this thread apart because your arrogance has overtaken you, then so be it, but everyone is entitled to an opinion and I DO NOT appreciate you tearing my advice to shreads because you have some spare time on your hands. Please next time before you start quoting other people, think about their situation and maybe how they came to give that advice.
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    (Original post by Natalierm2707)
    If all you want to do is pull apart everything I say, good luck to you, you seriously think you know everything about what Ii said, I was trying to explain how I overcame my medical issues and It now never stops me from doing anything.

    Every situation is different but I am just saying there is so much hope, and it shouldnt all be about the negatives, People need hope to get through things, its fine to be honest, but dont shoot down someones dreams. Its like me saying because someone (my auntie is an example) is paralysed they cant climb up the stairs, fine it sounds so stupid and impossible (but my auntie did every time without help), everything is possible when you try.

    If all you care about is pulling everyone on this thread apart because your arrogance has overtaken you, then so be it, but everyone is entitled to an opinion and I DO NOT appreciate you tearing my advice to shreads because you have some spare time on your hands. Please next time before you start quoting other people, think about their situation and maybe how they came to give that advice.
    Apologies if I came too hard on you. But I was trying to convey a sense of realism while also being highly critical of the unrealistic responses here especially when it comes to a topic as important as child H&S. When it comes to child's safety, every risk is important. And a teacher unable to control a class (for whatever reason) is a potential risk. And since your episodes of panic cannot be predicted it's paramount to fully assess if this will affect your daily activities and responsibilities as a teacher. You can't just leave the class on its own every time you have a panic attack. It looks like a potential breach of H&S. Especially if it is regular. It's important to understand that. Duty of care. Child's safety is more important than anyone's dream of becoming a teacher. Carnationlilyrose and Jane Baratheon, the former one an experienced teacher have given you the same response as me. It would not be a bad idea to think through this now that you still have plenty of doors open. From next year onwards, the number of doors will start closing.
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    (Original post by jessybean)
    I'm in my first year of unit studying primary education. Since November, I've been having fairly frequent panic attacks, some of them quite severe so that I cannot continue with whatever I was doing. There appear to be no triggers so nothing I can avoid really. My doctor prescribed me Propranolol and recently increased the dose. It really has improved, I used to have a bad attack almost everyday, now I'm down to maybe 3 small ones and 1 bad one a week, so although it's a vast improvement, its not quite sorted. I am also waiting to get CBT sessions at unit, so hopefully it will be sorted soon.

    So far, I've had two panic attacks during my placements at a primary school, again with no obvious triggers. In a PDR meeting yesterday, my mentor and tutor said that if they aren't convinced that my panic attacks have stopped, then they might have to suspend me, because I shouldn't be around the children, and what if I was on my own with the class?

    Obviously I completely understand that the children should not see me distressed, but it does not get to that point. If it is a mild attack, then I can disguise it if I distract myself with something (lets face it, there's always something to do in a classroom!). If it's a bad attack, then I remove myself from the room before it builds up too much. So I do understand that it may be difficult for me to complete placement tasks, for example, if I were to have one whilst being observed.

    However, as far as I am aware, I should not be left alone with a class (for my course at least). So I thought this should not be an issue, really. If this was an actual teaching job then yes, I see where they are coming from, but I won't be alone with pupils while I'm still a student.

    Speaking to other students, they also seemed to this this was unnecessarily harsh. Am I wrong to think suspension due to panic attacks is a little extreme? This is suspension from the university course, not just my placement. What about teachers who have asthma attacks? Or IBS? Or any other condition where they may suddenly need to leave the classroom? Obviously I understand that panic attacks aren't the same as these, but they all involve the adult leaving the classroom without much warning.

    I really don't want to get suspended, has anyone been in a similar situation?
    Could you take a break and come back to teaching once you are healthy? You should be looking after yourself and teacher training is intense enough without the issues you're having. From the uni's point of view, I think it's harsh but I understand why they are saying this - I'm a student and I'm often left alone with students for hours at a time. You can't take your eye off them - if something happened you'd be to blame, and your uni for allowing you to be in that position. It's just not worth it.
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    (Original post by Juichiro)
    Apologies if I came too hard on you. But I was trying to convey a sense of realism while also being highly critical of the unrealistic responses here especially when it comes to a topic as important as child H&S. When it comes to child's safety, every risk is important. And a teacher unable to control a class (for whatever reason) is a potential risk. And since your episodes of panic cannot be predicted it's paramount to fully assess if this will affect your daily activities and responsibilities as a teacher. You can't just leave the class on its own every time you have a panic attack. It looks like a potential breach of H&S. Especially if it is regular. It's important to understand that. Duty of care. Child's safety is more important than anyone's dream of becoming a teacher. Carnationlilyrose and Jane Baratheon, the former one an experienced teacher have given you the same response as me. It would not be a bad idea to think through this now that you still have plenty of doors open. From next year onwards, the number of doors will start closing.
    Also sorry, I mistook your point originally completely!! I agree that it will be a problem as she cannot just leave the class and the children s health and safety comes first. But I think if she manages to get them under control (to a very rare or almost non existent occurrence) then this shouldn't stop her from becoming a teacher.

    Maybe it would be a good idea for OP to get some advice as to whether this really could hugely impact on her career options, as NOW would be the time to change as it may be too late if it is left.

    The reason why I am so defensive about this topic is because I was always told I could never be a doctor because of my hemiplegic migraines, everyone told me that, until I got them under control and they no longer affect my life.

    It took me years to understand the triggers (bright light, alcohol) and I avoid them completely now, and live my life around them, I believe that everything is possible, and never give up, but you always have to be realistic.
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    This is really an issue that occupational health would have to weigh in on, I expect. It's their job to decide if you are fit and able to teach.

    I think (as usual) CarnationLilyRose put it best. By all means contact your union for advice, but the safety of the children is of the utmost importance. You will find that even as a student you most definitely will be left alone with them, and if you had an attack at that time would would not be permitted to leave them alone. What then?
 
 
 
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