Are there any chance of ireland unification?

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HucktheForde
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will we see it in our lifetime?
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Zarek
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Who can say, but anything is possible. There is now a way to work towards it by political and relationship building means.
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michaelhaych
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The overwhelming majority of Northern Ireland is unionist
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username917703
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(Original post by michaelhaych)
The overwhelming majority of Northern Ireland is unionist
Is it?
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DiddyDec01
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I highly doubt it.
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Rugby-Girl
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Its possible but personally I see I as abit unlikely. My reasons for thinking this is Tha a lot of people in the south don't really care, its mostly the north and in my experience border town areas south Armagh etc that are really patriotic about it. There are financial things like the way the republic is now that will turn people off voting for a united Ireland. Would I I like to see a united Ireland, of course I'd love to but I can't see it happening. Also I think due to high profile nature of the troubles it is unlikely that England will offer NI a referendum because it will be seen as giving in etc
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PenguinEmperor
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Personally I don't even think Sinn Fein want Irish reunification, they seem much happier being a big party in a small pond, rather than a small fish in a big pond xD
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PenguinEmperor
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(Original post by Rugby-Girl)
Its possible but personally I see I as abit unlikely. My reasons for thinking this is Tha a lot of people in the south don't really care, its mostly the north and in my experience border town areas south Armagh etc that are really patriotic about it. There are financial things like the way the republic is now that will turn people off voting for a united Ireland. Would I I like to see a united Ireland, of course I'd love to but I can't see it happening. Also I think due to high profile nature of the troubles it is unlikely that England will offer NI a referendum because it will be seen as giving in etc
England doesn't have to allow a referendum, a border poll can be enacted by the assembly I think every 10-15 years.
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chukster97
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Apparantly your not racist if you say "jokes" at the end
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Mick.w
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(Original post by HucktheForde)
will we see it in our lifetime?
its possible. I'd say there'd need to be some economic down turn and a feeling to need to detach from england whilst the republic was looking much nicer on the other side.

Like i don't think anyone saw scotland voting on independence coming.


but that sort of random event aside currently i don't see it happening.


I mean there's a few things.

Northern Ireland despite being roughly 50/50 protestant/catholic, people identify as 40% british 25% irish and 21% northern irish alone.

60% were british passport holders, 20% Irish and the rest held no passport.


Irish people from the republic are really kinda full of it. It's not really spoken about much, but the majority of irish people didnt want independence from the uk. because most Irish were in urban areas where they were largely dependent on trade and government.

the rebellion came from the minority in the countryside who didn't need the government.

It was only when the english started attacking pretty much any and everyone and incidents like croke park happened that the masses began to sway. But to be honest there was more support for Irish independence abroad than there was at home.

lets also not forget the mass amounts of traitors and turn coats.

nowadays everyone likes to say their grandad was part of the IRA and fought for Irish freedom and everyone likes to give themselves a big old slap on the back. but really most of them are not deserving of it. not everyone came from a line of hero's. and some irish were even serving in the british army at the time!

Irish people are full of it. and they are cowards. and I can say that cause I am one.

they gave up on northern ireland. they all say how "sad" it all was. but really they didnt give a damn. it was fake care.

modern day irish have allowed their government to corrupt (see Charles Haughey & the Mahon Tribunal)
modern day irish have allowed the culture to die. such as the gaeltacht. (see resignation of Seán Ó Cuirreáin)
modern day irish have allowed the prosperity of their nation die for personal gain. (see corrib gas field)
modern day irish have allowed have new colonial masters and have switched brussels for westminster (see Phillipe Legrain )
modern day irish have allowed themselves to lose the right to vote (see lisbon treaty)

its funny when irish from the republic meet irish from ulster they seem to look down their noses at them and think somehow that they are superior. many even have said to me "i don't see them as irish"

interesting that irish from the republic are not instead filled with a sense of shame when they meet someone from ulster, shame at being reminded of their failure to protect their own. a far cry from americas "no man left behind" ireland was more than happy to sell out a quarter of the nation and throw them to the brits as a sacrifice.

and i also find it funny that they have the cheek to not view them as "proper irish" considering they have more in common with the "irish patriots" of 1916 than any of them lot.

but its easy to be smug when your wrapped in the nanny's blanket of the republic.


for the longest time Irish from northern ireland have not given up on the republic. despite the fact that the republic gave up long ago and continues to avoid every hand shake offered by their "brothers" in the north.

so is it any wonder that the irish in ulster are starting to give up on these ass's in the south?

i don't blame em. the republics made itself clear, if not politically then certainly on a social grassroots level.

so thats why I'm not surprised when I hear that even though its 50% catholic only 25% identify nationally as irish.

I imagine the number of those who identify as the neutral "northern irish" is gonna grow ever higher.


and then also the fact that for one. the republic is just not as well run. look at the water tax and the private healthcare system.

you have old people who cannot affored healthcare having their homes seized due to the debt that they built up for getting treated in hospital.

No I don't blame the Irish in northern ireland for giving up on an Ireland that republicans gave up on long before them.

I leave you with the words of Yeats
"Romantic Ireland's dead and gone, It's with O'Leary in the grave."
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trustmeimlying1
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#11
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(Original post by Mick.w)
its possible. I'd say there'd need to be some economic down turn and a feeling to need to detach from england whilst the republic was looking much nicer on the other side.

Like i don't think anyone saw scotland voting on independence coming.


but that sort of random event aside currently i don't see it happening.


I mean there's a few things.

Northern Ireland despite being roughly 50/50 protestant/catholic, people identify as 40% british 25% irish and 21% northern irish alone.

60% were british passport holders, 20% Irish and the rest held no passport.


Irish people from the republic are really kinda full of it. It's not really spoken about much, but the majority of irish people didnt want independence from the uk. because most Irish were in urban areas where they were largely dependent on trade and government.

the rebellion came from the minority in the countryside who didn't need the government.

It was only when the english started attacking pretty much any and everyone and incidents like croke park happened that the masses began to sway. But to be honest there was more support for Irish independence abroad than there was at home.

lets also not forget the mass amounts of traitors and turn coats.

nowadays everyone likes to say their grandad was part of the IRA and fought for Irish freedom and everyone likes to give themselves a big old slap on the back. but really most of them are not deserving of it. not everyone came from a line of hero's. and some irish were even serving in the british army at the time!

Irish people are full of it. and they are cowards. and I can say that cause I am one.

they gave up on northern ireland. they all say how "sad" it all was. but really they didnt give a damn. it was fake care.

modern day irish have allowed their government to corrupt (see Charles Haughey & the Mahon Tribunal)
modern day irish have allowed the culture to die. such as the gaeltacht. (see resignation of Seán Ó Cuirreáin)
modern day irish have allowed the prosperity of their nation die for personal gain. (see corrib gas field)
modern day irish have allowed have new colonial masters and have switched brussels for westminster (see Phillipe Legrain )
modern day irish have allowed themselves to lose the right to vote (see lisbon treaty)

its funny when irish from the republic meet irish from ulster they seem to look down their noses at them and think somehow that they are superior. many even have said to me "i don't see them as irish"

interesting that irish from the republic are not instead filled with a sense of shame when they meet someone from ulster, shame at being reminded of their failure to protect their own. a far cry from americas "no man left behind" ireland was more than happy to sell out a quarter of the nation and throw them to the brits as a sacrifice.

and i also find it funny that they have the cheek to not view them as "proper irish" considering they have more in common with the "irish patriots" of 1916 than any of them lot.

but its easy to be smug when your wrapped in the nanny's blanket of the republic.


for the longest time Irish from northern ireland have not given up on the republic. despite the fact that the republic gave up long ago and continues to avoid every hand shake offered by their "brothers" in the north.

so is it any wonder that the irish in ulster are starting to give up on these ass's in the south?

i don't blame em. the republics made itself clear, if not politically then certainly on a social grassroots level.

so thats why I'm not surprised when I hear that even though its 50% catholic only 25% identify nationally as irish.

I imagine the number of those who identify as the neutral "northern irish" is gonna grow ever higher.


and then also the fact that for one. the republic is just not as well run. look at the water tax and the private healthcare system.

you have old people who cannot affored healthcare having their homes seized due to the debt that they built up for getting treated in hospital.

No I don't blame the Irish in northern ireland for giving up on an Ireland that republicans gave up on long before them.

I leave you with the words of Yeats
"Romantic Ireland's dead and gone, It's with O'Leary in the grave."
utter crap.

and no i dont wana argue about it.
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Mick.w
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#12
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(Original post by trustmeimlying1)
utter crap.

and no i dont wana argue about it.
thanks for letting me know lol.
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