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    Hi I've come across the concept dominant negative mutation. Please can someone explain how this differs from an autosomal dominant mutation? thanks
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    Dominant negative mutations, also known as 'antimorphic mutations' , have an altered gene product that acts antagonistically to the wild-type allele (i.e. works against the gene product of the wild-type allele). Essentially, one allele produces a mutant phenotypic effect, and a negative effect whereby it prevents or hinders a biological process. For example, take a protein dimer into consideration; if one monomer component is mutant in some functional aspect but the dimer is still able to form and function, it has a dominant affect on the wild-type allelic monomer, and a negative effect if if the negative mutation prevent the dimer from forming and/or functioning.

    Hope this helps.
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    (Original post by loukas2993)
    Dominant negative mutations, also known as 'antimorphic mutations' , have an altered gene product that acts antagonistically to the wild-type allele (i.e. works against the gene product of the wild-type allele). Essentially, one allele produces a mutant phenotypic effect, and a negative effect whereby it prevents or hinders a biological process. For example, take a protein dimer into consideration; if one monomer component is mutant in some functional aspect but the dimer is still able to form and function, it has a dominant affect on the wild-type allelic monomer, and a negative effect if if the negative mutation prevent the dimer from forming and/or functioning.

    Hope this helps.
    I see...but isn't that exactly the same as autosomal dominant? thanks
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    Autosomal dominant genes don't necessarily produce a negative effect, whereas dominant negative mutations do. For instance, dark brown eye colour is dominant in human's, but it isn't a negative effect.
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    (Original post by loukas2993)
    Autosomal dominant genes don't necessarily produce a negative effect, whereas dominant negative mutations do. For instance, dark brown eye colour is dominant in human's, but it isn't a negative effect.
    of course...thanks
 
 
 
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