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    I find chemistry incredibly interesting, as such I am thinking of reading chemistry. I am curious about what career paths I would have open with such a degree, not just chemist or accountant tell me all of them!
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    There are many options available, or so we're told all the time :P
    Statistics show students go into a very wide range of jobs. Chemistry opens many doors.
    For myself, I will apply for a PhD, because funding is available (compared to other subjects, where there is a lack of funding.)
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    (Original post by WarriorLlama)
    There are many options available, or so we're told all the time :P
    Statistics show students go into a very wide range of jobs. Chemistry opens many doors.
    For myself, I will apply for a PhD, because funding is available (compared to other subjects, where there is a lack of funding.)
    That's terribly bland, may I have some fields other than research, should you know any?
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    Teacher!
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    (Original post by slg60)
    That's terribly bland, many I have some fields other than research, should you know any?
    IB, Pharmacy, Pharmaceutical, Materials, Teaching and believe it or not, law.
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    (Original post by slg60)
    That's terribly bland, may I have some fields other than research, should you know any?
    Polymers are a huge area - the materials side of all that is pretty neat. I spent a year working with polyurethane which is used to make an absolutely huge range of stuff. Biopolymer materials go towards making things like contact lenses, for example.

    Formulation work is a fairly broad area that usually has a reasonable amount of opportunities - the biggest areas that you will know are companies like Unilever, and P&G. It's all fast moving consumer goods. You may be working on deodorants, or the next laundry detergent, cosmetics and so on. Other materials are formulated for various coatings, so companies like AkzoNobel for paints of many varieties (not just domestic! things like marine anti-fouling technology). You may be involved in areas of food - typically analytical - testing food standards for companies like Kellogg's or Mondelez (Kraft).

    Pharmaceutical/organic synthesis is pretty similar to what you'll experience at university for organic labs. If organic is your passion then agrochemicals or pharmaceuticals might be a good choice. Pharma isn't the best industry in this country though, but there are still odd bits around in organic synth still.

    I've seen a fair few grad scheme for the nuclear field. There will always be a need for environmental aspects of chemistry, so if you're after a role outside of the lab then a health & safety type job, industrial hygienist, is possible. Regulatory affairs and patent work (patent law) are other non-lab paths (and fairly well paid from what i've seen).
 
 
 
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