Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    • #1
    • Thread Starter
    #1

    Hey Guys!

    I really need some advice. Due to my household income, I'm not able to receive a grant from the government in any shape or form, this is kinda irrelevant.

    Basically, my parents will be funding my living costs entirely from their pocket. They plan to give me £300 a month, with extras such as my allowance and my savings.

    However, my Dad whose living in a separate residence (divorced) is also planning to contribute £60 a month. However, I'm planning to study in London and this means that my parents will be paying triple what they paid for my sister to go through university.

    I was wondering how to approach my Dad in politely asking if he could consider also paying a further contribution than what he paid for my sister considering the increased costs of London. He would be stopping the money he gives to my sister when she graduates later this year, meaning the additional £60 would come from that as opposed to an additional expenditure on his behalf.

    We go out for meals weekly, which cost £40-60 as part of him 'seeing me' these would also stop as I would be away in university, meaning his financial situation would actually be better off than it was previously. The reason I mention this is because I wanted to give some context to the situation.

    I don't feel like I am being particularly rude by asking for the additional money, primarily because my parents are paying triple what they did for my sister and the extra money would take off some pressure.

    How would you approach this situation, I am seeing him tomorrow so would likely bring it up.

    Also can anyone enlighten me on what a student who is receiving no financial support from parents and is wholly living on the grant, would have as a disposable income each month? (Just for some added perspective. Of course this would vary considering London is expensive)

    Thank you.
    • #1
    • Thread Starter
    #1

    Bump
    • #2
    #2

    Haha tbh if u were u I'd just show ur dad this post. You have explained everything here already in a nutshell so why can't you tell him exactly the same thing it seems very reasonable
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    I think your over thinking things to be honest.

    I would definitely find what your asking can be taken as slightly rude, and it cause a backlash whereby your dad refuses to give anything. The fact your parents are giving you money is not mandatory, its a gift considering their own finances. So contemplate before jumping in to it.

    To get £300 per month on top of all the grants and student loans is a significant amount. Most students make things work, not to mention applying for bursaries, scholarships and working part time.
    • Study Helper
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    Study Helper
    I think that probably would be regarded as rude. You're already in a much more advantageous position to many students (I'd be incredibly happy if my parents were able to give me anything close to £300/month) so to ask for extra really isn't particularly great in my view. Ask them if you want but it doesn't seem particularly reasonable.
    • #1
    • Thread Starter
    #1

    (Original post by Iqbal007)
    I think your over thinking things to be honest.

    I would definitely find what your asking can be taken as slightly rude, and it cause a backlash whereby your dad refuses to give anything. The fact your parents are giving you money is not mandatory, its a gift considering their own finances. So contemplate before jumping in to it.

    To get £300 per month on top of all the grants and student loans is a significant amount. Most students make things work, not to mention applying for bursaries, scholarships and working part time.
    My issue is, I'm not entitled to any grants, bursaries or scholarships because of my household income. Without my parents financing, university would not be possible, it is therefore hard to consider it as a gift. I'm grateful of course.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Anonymous)
    My issue is, I'm not entitled to any grants, bursaries or scholarships because of my household income. Without my parents financing, university would not be possible, it is therefore hard to consider it as a gift. I'm grateful of course.
    I would check the courses you have applied to, there are many scholarships that do not come with such requirements and even a few bursaries which come as standard due to the increase in fees.

    There are even scholarships for the people who do the best in the year.
    • #1
    • Thread Starter
    #1

    (Original post by Chlorophile)
    I think that probably would be regarded as rude. You're already in a much more advantageous position to many students (I'd be incredibly happy if my parents were able to give me anything close to £300/month) so to ask for extra really isn't particularly great in my view. Ask them if you want but it doesn't seem particularly reasonable.
    I feel I may have not explained it very well, the £300 funding is from my parents who I live with. Which I'm incredibly grateful for. The additional £60 (which I would be asking to increase to £120) would be from my divorcee Dad.

    I am open-minded to your view, why do you think I would be in a better position than other students? I'm not entirely sure what monthly budget everyone has. :confused:
    • Study Helper
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    Study Helper
    (Original post by Anonymous)
    I feel I may have not explained it very well, the £300 funding is from my parents who I live with. Which I'm incredibly grateful for. The additional £60 (which I would be asking to increase to £120) would be from my divorcee Dad.

    I am open-minded to your view, why do you think I would be in a better position than other students? I'm not entirely sure what monthly budget everyone has. :confused:
    Well I've not worked out my finances yet, but I do know that my household income is just high enough so that I don't qualify for any grants but low enough (plus my family lives in London so less expendable income) so that I can't really get any financial support from my family. So I don't have a choice, I'm going to have to get a summer job or something, and I think a lot of students will be in a similar position. You're extremely lucky to get £3k a year from your parents.
    • #1
    • Thread Starter
    #1

    (Original post by Iqbal007)
    I would check the courses you have applied to, there are many scholarships that do not come with such requirements and even a few bursaries which come as standard due to the increase in fees.

    There are even scholarships for the people who do the best in the year.
    There are only three meritocratic based bursaries, which are top ucas point holder, best A-level grades and best performing in first year exams. I'm unlikely to qualify for any of these.

    Granted, I'm in a rare situation as my other university options have several scholarships available. Although this particular university does not.
    • #1
    • Thread Starter
    #1

    (Original post by Chlorophile)
    Well I've not worked out my finances yet, but I do know that my household income is just high enough so that I don't qualify for any grants but low enough (plus my family lives in London so less expendable income) so that I can't really get any financial support from my family. So I don't have a choice, I'm going to have to get a summer job or something, and I think a lot of students will be in a similar position. You're extremely lucky to get £3k a year from your parents.
    Well I appreciate your input, It's good to have perspective. I can understand that despite being over the criterion of the student finance bodies, that doesn't mean you necessarily have the disposable income to maintain a monthly allowance. However, they still offer no financial support.

    It seems I have been naive to assume that I would need this above and beyond figure to get through university...
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Anonymous)
    There are only three meritocratic based bursaries, which are top ucas point holder, best A-level grades and best performing in first year exams. I'm unlikely to qualify for any of these.

    Granted, I'm in a rare situation as my other university options have several scholarships available. Although this particular university does not.
    Have you tried to look into non-university scholarships?
    Or even just getting a part time job, great to make some money, get something on your CV and meet people.
    • Study Helper
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    Study Helper
    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Well I appreciate your input, It's good to have perspective. I can understand that despite being over the criterion of the student finance bodies, that doesn't mean you necessarily have the disposable income to maintain a monthly allowance. However, they still offer no financial support.

    It seems I have been naive to assume that I would need this above and beyond figure to get through university...
    If you can get extra support then that's great - if your parents have tons of disposable income then fine, ask them. What I didn't like is the sense of entitlement that came across in your original post, if that's misinterpreted then sorry.
    • #1
    • Thread Starter
    #1

    (Original post by Chlorophile)
    If you can get extra support then that's great - if your parents have tons of disposable income then fine, ask them. What I didn't like is the sense of entitlement that came across in your original post, if that's misinterpreted then sorry.
    Yeah, the reason that came across is because my mum and step-father are paying thousands of pounds for my university education and my dad is paying £60 so it just bugs me a little bit that's all.

    (Original post by Iqbal007)
    Have you tried to look into non-university scholarships?
    Or even just getting a part time job, great to make some money, get something on your CV and meet people.
    That's a good idea, I'll have to see how I feel in university. It seems money won't really be an issue by the previous posts. I thought it would be.
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Anonymous)
    I was wondering how to approach my Dad in politely asking if he could consider also paying a further contribution than what he paid for my sister considering the increased costs of London.

    How would you approach this situation, I am seeing him tomorrow so would likely bring it up.
    Offer a BJ?
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    In regards to needing the extra money - it depends how well you budget, your accommodation etc. Your student loan will cover most your needs but in some situations I know accomodation costs can eat up a lot of it which might make extra money necessary. A small part time job is very common, youll earn enough to buy food etc! £360 a month would make life far easier! To put things into perspective, i was considered very oppulent at uni spending £50 a week on food. Most people spend around £20-£25 a week. Obviously in London you have to factor in travel costs, but food is usually your biggest expense after accomodation.


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    I thought everyone got a loan? so you would have around £3000 a year plus what your parents give you which will equate to around £4000, so you will have more than some who live in London but not enough to live extravagantly, you will have to be careful...

    to be honest I wouldn't ask your dad for more money yourself, unless you know him very well and know it will go down okay, you could casually bring up how expensive living in London is going to be and how your budget is tight and you're worried... but I would finding asking quite rude and it seems ungrateful for what you are already getting - remember that you probably don't know your dad's financial situation completely, take into account family politics (i.e. your sister feeling hard done by)and the fact that you chose to live somewhere expensive for uni... it might be he hasn't even thought about it and jumps to give you more, but either way you shouldn't feel he is being stingy or unfair, it's his money
    • #1
    • Thread Starter
    #1

    (Original post by doodle_333)
    I thought everyone got a loan? so you would have around £3000 a year plus what your parents give you which will equate to around £4000, so you will have more than some who live in London but not enough to live extravagantly, you will have to be careful...

    to be honest I wouldn't ask your dad for more money yourself, unless you know him very well and know it will go down okay, you could casually bring up how expensive living in London is going to be and how your budget is tight and you're worried... but I would finding asking quite rude and it seems ungrateful for what you are already getting - remember that you probably don't know your dad's financial situation completely, take into account family politics (i.e. your sister feeling hard done by)and the fact that you chose to live somewhere expensive for uni... it might be he hasn't even thought about it and jumps to give you more, but either way you shouldn't feel he is being stingy or unfair, it's his money
    Hey! Well basically, the loan you make reference to is wiped out by the university accommodation because it's so expensive. My parents are actually paying an additional £2000 on top of that loan to cover the accommodation before living expenses even comes into it.

    I've since spoken to my parents and I'm likely to have about £400-460 a month to live off which is quite comfortable. I can add to this with my savings need be.

    I may come across as somewhat entitled to the additional funding from my Dad, the reason is.. For maintenance towards his two children he should be paying triple what he does for me and my sister. So in essence, the money he gives us for university is what he should be giving my mother as maintenance. It's her kind gesture to forward that to me and my sister.
    Offline

    9
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by doodle_333)
    I thought everyone got a loan? so you would have around £3000 a year plus what your parents give you which will equate to around £4000, so you will have more than some who live in London but not enough to live extravagantly, you will have to be careful...

    to be honest I wouldn't ask your dad for more money yourself, unless you know him very well and know it will go down okay, you could casually bring up how expensive living in London is going to be and how your budget is tight and you're worried... but I would finding asking quite rude and it seems ungrateful for what you are already getting - remember that you probably don't know your dad's financial situation completely, take into account family politics (i.e. your sister feeling hard done by)and the fact that you chose to live somewhere expensive for uni... it might be he hasn't even thought about it and jumps to give you more, but either way you shouldn't feel he is being stingy or unfair, it's his money
    Loans are calculated on household income. If OPs household income is larger than x amount, they won't be entitled to a loan.
    • #1
    • Thread Starter
    #1

    (Original post by aoxa)
    Loans are calculated on household income. If OPs household income is larger than x amount, they won't be entitled to a loan.
    Yeah it's basically this. However, it's not a loan it is a grant. To which many students will receive a sum of £3000-5000 which I am not entitled to based on household income.
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
TSR Support Team

We have a brilliant team of more than 60 Support Team members looking after discussions on The Student Room, helping to make it a fun, safe and useful place to hang out.

Updated: January 30, 2015
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Has a teacher ever helped you cheat?
    Useful resources
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Write a reply...
    Reply
    Hide
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.