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Is it possible to self study two A levels alongside five in school? watch

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    Just a bit of background:

    I'm currently choosing my A levels, and have decided on doing the following:
    Physics
    Chemistry
    Maths
    Further Maths
    History

    However, I would also really like to study Economics and English Literature and am wondering whether it is possible to do them all, as well as a host of extra-curriculars.
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    Short answer: it is possible.
    Longer answer: it's possible, but few people attempt it, and few people succeed in it. The trouble with studying A levels outside school is that you have to be very dedicated and motivated. No teacher is setting you homework, so there are no repercussions for letting things slip. Without the school framework, it's more likely you won't be prepared for exams in time. That said, I'm teaching myself 2 of my 5 A-levels, and if you're conscientious enough it's almost preferable. You can move at a faster pace, have a greater sense of achievement, and often have a better understanding of the basic principles at the end.
    However, unless you are extremely (extremely!) bright and quick, I think seven with two outside is too many. AS levels require a lot more time than GCSEs, and I would expect you will get very stressed very quickly if you tried to take on too much. Better to choose five in school, give it a month or two of study to see how you cope with the jump, and if you still are really sure you could manage, start on an additional one. I wouldn't do Eng Lit outside school though, unless you have a very kind teacher willing to mark all your essays :P
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    No sorry - it will be impossible.

    A levels are changing and everything will be new. Are you sure your school will even let you do 5 as many are lowering their offer to 3 or 4 maximum?

    A levels are very different to GCSEs as you need to spend time outside class reading around the subject as well as homework.

    I was teaching when A level were linear before and so I know the workload will be impossible.
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    (Original post by davidtyoember)
    yes you can , but why??

    also, if you are going to do it, id suggest you doing English literature in school in place of f/maths and self-studying Fmaths/maths , simply because English Literature is a subject that often has coursework as well as the exam.
    Personally, I really want to go to a top Ivy League university, and I think the extra A-levels would help me stand out, especially as Economics is something I'm considering at uni, and as Eng Lit is a humanity which the American system loves.

    In relation, to your point about taking maths/fmaths externally, I initially considered that, but unfortunately my school schedule doesn't allow it.

    btw, thanks for the quick reply
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    (Original post by Muttley79)
    No sorry - it will be impossible.

    A levels are changing and everything will be new. Are you sure your school will even let you do 5 as many are lowering their offer to 3 or 4 maximum?

    A levels are very different to GCSEs as you need to spend time outside class reading around the subject as well as homework.

    I was teaching when A level were linear before and so I know the workload will be impossible.
    Is the Linear better?

    And what if the a-levels weren't changing and they were modular? Would it be possible?
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    (Original post by Actaeon)
    Short answer: it is possible.
    Longer answer: it's possible, but few people attempt it, and few people succeed in it. The trouble with studying A levels outside school is that you have to be very dedicated and motivated. No teacher is setting you homework, so there are no repercussions for letting things slip. Without the school framework, it's more likely you won't be prepared for exams in time. That said, I'm teaching myself 2 of my 5 A-levels, and if you're conscientious enough it's almost preferable. You can move at a faster pace, have a greater sense of achievement, and often have a better understanding of the basic principles at the end.
    However, unless you are extremely (extremely!) bright and quick, I think seven with two outside is too many. AS levels require a lot more time than GCSEs, and I would expect you will get very stressed very quickly if you tried to take on too much. Better to choose five in school, give it a month or two of study to see how you cope with the jump, and if you still are really sure you could manage, start on an additional one. I wouldn't do Eng Lit outside school though, unless you have a very kind teacher willing to mark all your essays :P
    As far as dedication is concerned, I'd like to think I've got a bit of experience as I'm doing additional GCSEs in Spanish and Mandarin right now, both of which are going very well. Apart from for marking coursework, is a teacher really needed for Eng Lit?
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    (Original post by Muttley79)
    No sorry - it will be impossible.

    A levels are changing and everything will be new. Are you sure your school will even let you do 5 as many are lowering their offer to 3 or 4 maximum?

    A levels are very different to GCSEs as you need to spend time outside class reading around the subject as well as homework.

    I was teaching when A level were linear before and so I know the workload will be impossible.

    + SOME A-Levels turn linear in 2015, then some in 2016 then the rest in 2016


    I think English Lit and Econ will be still under the old rule of as and a2 in September

    (Original post by SinghChan)
    As far as dedication is concerned, I'd like to think I've got a bit of experience as I'm doing additional GCSEs in Spanish and Mandarin right now, both of which are going very well. Apart from for marking coursework, is a teacher really needed for Eng Lit?
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    You shouldn't try to self-study essay subjects. Would be easier to do maths/science subjects on your own
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    (Original post by anonwinner)
    You shouldn't try to self-study essay subjects. Would be easier to do maths/science subjects on your own
    The thing is that I'm far better at the essay subjects (I got 100% on all of my English language and literature coursework at iGCSE). And plus it wouldn't be possible with my school system.
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    elmosandy - Econ and English are changing in September 2015 according to exam board websites ..

    https://www.gov.uk/government/upload...17-12-14-3.pdf
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    (Original post by SinghChan)
    As far as dedication is concerned, I'd like to think I've got a bit of experience as I'm doing additional GCSEs in Spanish and Mandarin right now, both of which are going very well. Apart from for marking coursework, is a teacher really needed for Eng Lit?
    Definitely - a teacher is far more necessary for an essay based subject than physics, maths, further maths and so on. Essay technique is partially about content, and partially about written style, which only comes with experience. If you aren't getting regular professional feedback on your essay technique, you won't know what you're doing wrong, and you won't be able to improve. A "black-and-white" subject like maths is much more preferable for self-teaching because of this.
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    I'm currently doing English Literature at A2, and can I just say there is NO way I could've gotten an A in AS without the guidance of my teachers.

    EngLit at A level is a whole different beast and it's so important to have well experienced teachers for guidance, feedback and marking. There's no specification to learn, no 'correct answer' markscheme and I think it's really important to do it in college to help you both stylistically and conceptually. I look back at essays that I thought were great when I started AS and, honestly, now I think they're awful.

    (Note: I found EngLit and EngLang incredibly easy at GCSE and got A*s in both with little effort. A Level is very different! In general, I'd advise you stick to 5 A Levels MAXIMUM as - for example - you'd be better off getting AAAA/AAAAA than AABBCC or AAABBC, especially as most unis are more than happy with 3/4 AS Levels)
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    A levels are far more difficult than GCSEs. Since you havn't got a clue how you will do even in your GCSEs yet, any idea of doing multiple A levels is frankly nuts.

    NO University will be impressed by more than 3 A levels.

    Do 3 A levels properly and get A* grades.

    Go to Uni and do a 'Liberal Arts' or 'Liberal Arts and Sciences' degree - which will allow you to study a whole range of different subject at once.

    KCL - http://www.kcl.ac.uk/artshums/depts/liberal/index.aspx
    Bristol - http://www.bristol.ac.uk/arts/course.../liberal-arts/
    Birmingham - http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/undergra...s-science.aspx
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    (Original post by SinghChan)
    Personally, I really want to go to a top Ivy League university, and I think the extra A-levels would help me stand out, especially as Economics is something I'm considering at uni, and as Eng Lit is a humanity which the American system loves.

    In relation, to your point about taking maths/fmaths externally, I initially considered that, but unfortunately my school schedule doesn't allow it.

    btw, thanks for the quick reply
    American universities (esp. Ivy League) are much more interested in extra curriculars (voluntary work, sports excellence, etc) than lots of A-Levels. But you will also need v good scores in SAT or ACT.

    Read the info here:
    http://www.fulbright.org.uk/study-in...graduate-study
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    (Original post by Muttley79)
    elmosandy - Econ and English are changing in September 2015 according to exam board websites ..

    https://www.gov.uk/government/upload...17-12-14-3.pdf

    Okay
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    (Original post by SinghChan)
    Personally, I really want to go to a top Ivy League university, and I think the extra A-levels would help me stand out, especially as Economics is something I'm considering at uni, and as Eng Lit is a humanity which the American system loves.

    In relation, to your point about taking maths/fmaths externally, I initially considered that, but unfortunately my school schedule doesn't allow it.

    btw, thanks for the quick reply
    If you're considering economics at university you really should do at a level instead of one of your smarter subjects. Five amazing grades are better than seven mediocre. You also need to understand that a levels are so much harder than GCSE. Many find it hard to manage four as levels after doing around eleven GCSEs let alone seven. Also doing well Ina subject at GCSE doesn't automatically mean you we will find it easy at a level.


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    (Original post by scavi2008)
    I'm currently doing English Literature at A2, and can I just say there is NO way I could've gotten an A in AS without the guidance of my teachers.

    EngLit at A level is a whole different beast and it's so important to have well experienced teachers for guidance, feedback and marking. There's no specification to learn, no 'correct answer' markscheme and I think it's really important to do it in college to help you both stylistically and conceptually. I look back at essays that I thought were great when I started AS and, honestly, now I think they're awful.

    (Note: I found EngLit and EngLang incredibly easy at GCSE and got A*s in both with little effort. A Level is very different! In general, I'd advise you stick to 5 A Levels MAXIMUM as - for example - you'd be better off getting AAAA/AAAAA than AABBCC or AAABBC, especially as most unis are more than happy with 3/4 AS Levels)
    (Original post by Actaeon)
    Definitely - a teacher is far more necessary for an essay based subject than physics, maths, further maths and so on. Essay technique is partially about content, and partially about written style, which only comes with experience. If you aren't getting regular professional feedback on your essay technique, you won't know what you're doing wrong, and you won't be able to improve. A "black-and-white" subject like maths is much more preferable for self-teaching because of this.
    (Original post by mliela)
    If you're considering economics at university you really should do at a level instead of one of your smarter subjects. Five amazing grades are better than seven mediocre. You also need to understand that a levels are so much harder than GCSE. Many find it hard to manage four as levels after doing around eleven GCSEs let alone seven. Also doing well Ina subject at GCSE doesn't automatically mean you we will find it easy at a level.


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    While i'm not saying you are wrong but there are some people Homeschooled for A-Levels and go on to uni and get good grades, some in ALL essay subjects... BUT they use a distance learning provider which gives them two year work in a folder and they complete the Homework at home and send the Homework off to a tutor they are given by the learning provider.... the tutor can guide them

    Not saying it's easy but can be done


    However seven a-levels.... op MIGHT cope, but it'll be hard work
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    (Original post by elmosandy)
    ...However seven a-levels.... op MIGHT cope, but it'll be hard work
    And unnecessary.

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    (Original post by SinghChan)
    Just a bit of background:

    I'm currently choosing my A levels, and have decided on doing the following:
    Physics
    Chemistry
    Maths
    Further Maths
    History

    However, I would also really like to study Economics and English Literature and am wondering whether it is possible to do them all, as well as a host of extra-curriculars.
    Hi,

    It is possible but wildly unnecessary.

    I'm doing 5 A levels and studying 1 of them privately:

    Maths
    Further Maths
    History
    Geography

    And doing Economics privately.

    Economics is the easiest to study privately from what you mentioned. I wouldn't study further maths privately though as it's the hardest subject you have there.
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    Yes, it's possible, but extremely unadvisable. I thought about teaching myself AS Physics and GCSE Astronomy but realised that I was insane to believe it was possible. But that's just me!

    Posted from TSR Mobile
 
 
 
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