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    I feel as if 20 to 25 will be my prime years. Having heard all the horrible stories about how medical school leaves u with little or no social life im skeptical I will be regretting not doing things like:
    . Going to the restaurant with friends
    . Meeting my soulmate
    . having fun with friends during weekends
    . Travelling



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    If medical school leaves you with no social life, you're doing it wrong.
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    What do you expect to be doing instead? 5 consecutive gap years?

    I found med school to be significantly less time consuming than a 9-5 job, plus a whole lot more interesting.
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    I'd quite like to study Medicine one day, but the opportunity cost of giving up my 20s was too high for me. Just throwing in that not just from a social perspective, but the fact that your 20s are the best opportunity to try and establish yourself financially.
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    I am also having this dilemma. I've been looking at grad entry medicine, but I'd be 26 by the time I leave med school.
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    (Original post by Hal.E.Lujah)
    I'd quite like to study Medicine one day, but the opportunity cost of giving up my 20s was too high for me. Just throwing in that not just from a social perspective, but the fact that your 20s are the best opportunity to try and establish yourself financially.
    What are u saying ?

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    (Original post by Etomidate)
    If medical school leaves you with no social life, you're doing it wrong.
    How will I pass when i have s social life ?

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    Each day was worth it.

    PS: Medicine isn't for you then OP
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    (Original post by AsandaLFC)
    How will I pass when i have s social life ?

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    Work/life balance, mate. It's all about knowing when to have a laugh and when to get your head down.

    Medschool isn't as hard as people would lead you to believe.
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    (Original post by nexttime)
    What do you expect to be doing instead? 5 consecutive gap years?

    I found med school to be significantly less time consuming than a 9-5 job, plus a whole lot more interesting.
    As ive stated before. I would like to travell and meet my soul mate. I wouldnt want to meet someone when im 30 bcos the possibilities of meeting someone at that age are


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    (Original post by bluemax)
    Each day was worth it.

    PS: Medicine isn't for you then OP
    Hey bluemax do u have whatsapp ? Or any other instant messenger ?

    I could use you for motivation

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    (Original post by Etomidate)
    Work/life balance, mate. It's all about knowing when to have a laugh and when to get your head down.

    Medschool isn't as hard as people would lead you to believe.
    I would like to laugh every friday and saturday. It scares me when my friend studies on a Friday night.

    The problem with studying is that once you get hooked lets say u study everyday. Once u skip one day you panick and become abnormal

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    (Original post by AsandaLFC)
    I would like to laugh every friday and saturday. It scares me when my friend studies on a Friday night.

    The problem with studying is that once you get hooked lets say u study everyday. Once u skip one day you panick and become abnormal

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    Find better friends.

    People go a little crazy at medschool. Personally, I'm rarely in hospital for a full 8-5 and I don't often do work when I'm at home, minus the few weeks before exams.

    Once you get out of the pre-clinical phase, medschool is pretty cushy.
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    Well seeing as I have no social life anyway, I think I'll rather enjoy it
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    (Original post by AsandaLFC)
    As ive stated before. I would like to travell and meet my soul mate. I wouldnt want to meet someone when im 30 bcos the possibilities of meeting someone at that age are


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    I hope you're trolling.

    Whether you are or you aren't, on the basis of what you're posting, a healthcare profession isn't for you. If you can't take the thought of studying on a Friday night, how would you handle on-call hours once qualified, or even the shift patterns during training? All the medical and nursing students on the wards I worked on had to do weird hours sometimes - it's par for the course, hospitals don't just open 9 to 5. (This was more the student nurses than the medics from what I could see, but I've run into student medics on the ward at five a.m. before now.) If you see that as wasted time then this is probably the wrong job for you. Arriving with a bunch of prejudices about 30+ female patients wouldn't work in your favour either.
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    (Original post by AsandaLFC)
    I feel as if 20 to 25 will be my prime years. Having heard all the horrible stories about how medical school leaves u with little or no social life im skeptical I will be regretting not doing things like:
    . Going to the restaurant with friends
    . Meeting my soulmate
    . having fun with friends during weekends
    . Travelling



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    Aged 16 I also thought this. I opted not to go to 6th form or university and get a job, meet a partner and start living. At age 23 I had found it extremely hard to earn enough money to "live" and do the fun things you mention. My 9-5 job also left me with much less free time than my friends still in full-time education.

    At 23 (after completing an access to medicine course) I began studying medicine. Now aged 26 and in my 3rd year, I can say I have had a much better social life since being at university than before. As a medical student you can choose how much work you want to put in. If you attend lectures and placement, and do a minimal amount of studying, you will pass your exams and have plenty of time off to spend with friends. If you want to get A's in every exam you may need to sacrifice dinner with friends and weekends away. But atleast the choice is there.

    IMO your early 20's will be much more fun spent at university than in a part-time/full-time job. Then when its time to start building a career, you already have the primary degree in the pocket.
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    (Original post by opalescent)
    I hope you're trolling.

    Whether you are or you aren't, on the basis of what you're posting, a healthcare profession isn't for you. If you can't take the thought of studying on a Friday night, how would you handle on-call hours once qualified, or even the shift patterns during training? All the medical and nursing students on the wards I worked on had to do weird hours sometimes - it's par for the course, hospitals don't just open 9 to 5. (This was more the student nurses than the medics from what I could see, but I've run into student medics on the ward at five a.m. before now.) If you see that as wasted time then this is probably the wrong job for you. Arriving with a bunch of prejudices about 30+ female patients wouldn't work in your favour either.
    Believe it or not, you don't have to be a martyr to be a doctor. It's just a job.
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    (Original post by um12)
    Aged 16 I also thought this. I opted not to go to 6th form or university and get a job, meet a partner and start living. At age 23 I had found it extremely hard to earn enough money to "live" and do the fun things you mention. My 9-5 job also left me with much less free time than my friends still in full-time education.

    At 23 (after completing an access to medicine course) I began studying medicine. Now aged 26 and in my 3rd year, I can say I have had a much better social life since being at university than before. As a medical student you can choose how much work you want to put in. If you attend lectures and placement, and do a minimal amount of studying, you will pass your exams and have plenty of time off to spend with friends. If you want to get A's in every exam you may need to sacrifice dinner with friends and weekends away. But atleast the choice is there.

    IMO your early 20's will be much more fun spent at university than in a part-time/full-time job. Then when its time to start building a career, you already have the primary degree in the pocket.
    Well this is very helpful.

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    (Original post by spleenharvester)
    I am also having this dilemma. I've been looking at grad entry medicine, but I'd be 26 by the time I leave med school.
    I know people who have started medical school at 26. Contrary to popular belief, life doesn't end at 30!

    You will probably also have alot more free time on your hands as a student, rather than working a full time job.
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    (Original post by opalescent)
    I hope you're trolling.

    Whether you are or you aren't, on the basis of what you're posting, a healthcare profession isn't for you. If you can't take the thought of studying on a Friday night, how would you handle on-call hours once qualified, or even the shift patterns during training? .
    I personally wouldn't mind on calls hours. Because I will be around people rather than been stuck with books.

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