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    I am set to finish my undergraduate degree in Childhood Studies in May and it is looking likely that I will graduate with a 1st.

    I have my heart set on a career in academia, however I am not in a position to self fund either a masters or PhD.

    In an ideal world I would like to begin a PhD in Education, or at least an MPhil/PhD in Education, in the next academic year.

    I have spoke to many people about the likelihood of me being accepted onto such programs and what chance I have of receiving funding, however I have got a lot of mixed messages.

    I was just wondering if any of you have done something similar to this and how did it pan out?

    Any advice would be greatly appreciated!

    Many thanks
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    I suspect the reason you haven't received a quicker answer is that it's relatively rare to find someone who is doing a fully-funded education postgrad straight after their undergraduate degree. The research bodies tend to favour PhDs over Masters, and education seems to be.. well… very low down in their order of importance.

    In my experience (which is obviously affected by my chosen route) it's far more common for people who are working in education to study for a part-time degree whilst carrying out their full time job. This solves the problem of funding (and sometimes employers may contribute towards fees) while also meaning that study is less theoretical as it's backed up by experience, and research is more relevant because you're carrying out research in your own setting.

    It also seems to be a more popular route into academia - thinking of education academics I know, the vast majority of them have worked in education (as head teachers, teachers, advisors etc) before taking up their positions at the universities. Actually I can only think of one person who's followed the traditional undergrad- Masters-PhD route and gone straight into academia, which possibly suggests that experience within an educational setting is looked upon favourably when academics are appointed.

    By all means start to search for funding, but be prepared to put a LOT of time and effort into it (making sure that it doesn't detract from your current studies, a first is going to be very important if you're going for competitive funding) and bear in mind that some funding deadlines may already have passed for a 2015 start.

    In the 'good news' side of things, actually getting a place on a course is probably going to be the easiest part of the process! Good luck
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    Academia is pointless
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    (Original post by Jantaculum)
    I suspect the reason you haven't received a quicker answer is that it's relatively rare to find someone who is doing a fully-funded education postgrad straight after their undergraduate degree. The research bodies tend to favour PhDs over Masters, and education seems to be.. well… very low down in their order of importance.

    In my experience (which is obviously affected by my chosen route) it's far more common for people who are working in education to study for a part-time degree whilst carrying out their full time job. This solves the problem of funding (and sometimes employers may contribute towards fees) while also meaning that study is less theoretical as it's backed up by experience, and research is more relevant because you're carrying out research in your own setting.

    It also seems to be a more popular route into academia - thinking of education academics I know, the vast majority of them have worked in education (as head teachers, teachers, advisors etc) before taking up their positions at the universities. Actually I can only think of one person who's followed the traditional undergrad- Masters-PhD route and gone straight into academia, which possibly suggests that experience within an educational setting is looked upon favourably when academics are appointed.

    By all means start to search for funding, but be prepared to put a LOT of time and effort into it (making sure that it doesn't detract from your current studies, a first is going to be very important if you're going for competitive funding) and bear in mind that some funding deadlines may already have passed for a 2015 start.

    In the 'good news' side of things, actually getting a place on a course is probably going to be the easiest part of the process! Good luck

    Thanks for the reply @Jantaculum , much appreciated!

    As part of my current degree, and previous courses, I have experience in education in LSA roles but not a great deal as the lead teacher. This consists of support in SEN as well as primary, secondary and further education settings.

    My main reason for not wanting to go full-time in a teaching role at a non-HE institute is that I do not find the course content as stimulating or challenging. Whilst I fully understand that ensuring that content is comprehended by students is not an easy task at all, I would personally rather be lecturing on course where I myself feel somewhat challenged.

    This is why I am keen to go straight from BA to MPhil/PhD as this would allow me to be in a much stronger position to apply for such roles.

    Whilst I do not expect to get my dream job straight away, I do have career goals in my mind and I do want to achieve them as soon as possible.

    @Jantaculum I have done some research on studentships and it does seem that the deadlines are approaching. I was wondering if you, or anyone else for that matter, could recommend the best places to look online for an extensive list of the studentships available, should there be one?
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    (Original post by eddnoon)
    Thanks for the reply @Jantaculum , much appreciated!

    As part of my current degree, and previous courses, I have experience in education in LSA roles but not a great deal as the lead teacher. This consists of support in SEN as well as primary, secondary and further education settings.

    My main reason for not wanting to go full-time in a teaching role at a non-HE institute is that I do not find the course content as stimulating or challenging. Whilst I fully understand that ensuring that content is comprehended by students is not an easy task at all, I would personally rather be lecturing on course where I myself feel somewhat challenged.

    This is why I am keen to go straight from BA to MPhil/PhD as this would allow me to be in a much stronger position to apply for such roles.

    Whilst I do not expect to get my dream job straight away, I do have career goals in my mind and I do want to achieve them as soon as possible.

    @Jantaculum I have done some research on studentships and it does seem that the deadlines are approaching. I was wondering if you, or anyone else for that matter, could recommend the best places to look online for an extensive list of the studentships available, should there be one?
    Sounds like you've thought it through - but do remember that as an education academic the main research will be focussed on schools and teachers - or you'll be lecturing to potential or existing teachers. Having as much experience as you can will give you more credibility to such an audience.

    I'm afraid that there isn't a list, and even if there were it wouldn't be extensive. The best I can suggest is that you check on a website like findaPhD.com (which you'e probably already done) and see which are offering university-based funding
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    (Original post by Jantaculum)
    Sounds like you've thought it through - but do remember that as an education academic the main research will be focussed on schools and teachers - or you'll be lecturing to potential or existing teachers. Having as much experience as you can will give you more credibility to such an audience.

    I'm afraid that there isn't a list, and even if there were it wouldn't be extensive. The best I can suggest is that you check on a website like findaPhD.com (which you'e probably already done) and see which are offering university-based funding

    Thanks for getting back to me again @jantaculum

    Yes that is a good point regarding experience and if my applications are unsuccessful this year I intend to gain experience in the field over the next academic year before applying for next years studentships.

    Education is not the only content I would have interest in lecturing in. My current course, Childhood Studies, is one I would be very interested in teaching in. My current tutors have advised than an education based PhD would be appropriate for such a course.

    I used that site a couple of months ago but I notice there are a few more available now, so thank you for bringing that back to my attention.

    Much appreciated!
 
 
 
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