ohemarica
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Hey guys,

I am applying for university in september 2015 and i am applying to study psychology as i want a career in helping people with mental health problems. However i'm really worried that when i leave university i won't get a good job and I don't want to waste my time doing psychology when I could study something else. Is Psychology a degree worth doing? I want a good profession in helping people with mental health and I want to make sure that by studying Psychology that i am on the right route.
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ohemarica
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Anyone???


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kathykathykathy
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Psychology is definitely a decent foundation for getting into mental health related jobs. Can you be more specific about what you mean by "helping people"? You haven't specified if you want to work as a psychologist, assistant psychologist, support worker, etc. You can help people with mental health problems by just volunteering one day a week for a mental health organisation.

Mental health nursing is an alternative option that directly leads into a mental health job.
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Lord Asriel
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Its worth remembering that only 15-20% of psychology graduates go onto become psychologists and only a smaller proportion of that work as clinical or counselling psychologists that typically work in mental health.

A good account of the struggle that psychology graduates are faced with can be found in the book "Secret Diary of an Assistant psychologist" (http://www.amazon.co.uk/Irrelevant-E...dp/B00EQFE5JW/) which shows the sort of work people do immediately after graduation.

For more guaranteed work mental health nursing is a good option, as is something like occupational therapy. It may be worth exploring what type of work within mental health you may want to do which would direct your choice of degree.
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ohemarica
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(Original post by kathykathykathy)
Psychology is definitely a decent foundation for getting into mental health related jobs. Can you be more specific about what you mean by "helping people"? You haven't specified if you want to work as a psychologist, assistant psychologist, support worker, etc. You can help people with mental health problems by just volunteering one day a week for a mental health organisation.

Mental health nursing is an alternative option that directly leads into a mental health job.
Yes i would like to go into a mental health job i.e a psychologist in a hospital espeically with children but I am aware it is hard to get into. I'm really stuck because I have already sent off my application to universities.

Or, I will go into being a GP.
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ohemarica
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(Original post by Lord Asriel)
Its worth remembering that only 15-20% of psychology graduates go onto become psychologists and only a smaller proportion of that work as clinical or counselling psychologists that typically work in mental health.

A good account of the struggle that psychology graduates are faced with can be found in the book "Secret Diary of an Assistant psychologist" (http://www.amazon.co.uk/Irrelevant-E...dp/B00EQFE5JW/) which shows the sort of work people do immediately after graduation.

For more guaranteed work mental health nursing is a good option, as is something like occupational therapy. It may be worth exploring what type of work within mental health you may want to do which would direct your choice of degree.

That's what I find quite daunting that it is only 15-20% of graduates but yes I do want a career in. I don't know what to actually do as I have already sent of my application to university.
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ohemarica
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(Original post by Lord Asriel)
Its worth remembering that only 15-20% of psychology graduates go onto become psychologists and only a smaller proportion of that work as clinical or counselling psychologists that typically work in mental health.

A good account of the struggle that psychology graduates are faced with can be found in the book "Secret Diary of an Assistant psychologist" (http://www.amazon.co.uk/Irrelevant-E...dp/B00EQFE5JW/) which shows the sort of work people do immediately after graduation.

For more guaranteed work mental health nursing is a good option, as is something like occupational therapy. It may be worth exploring what type of work within mental health you may want to do which would direct your choice of degree.

That's what I find quite daunting that it is only 15-20% of graduates but yes I do want a career in mental health something along being a psychologist or therapist. I don't know what to actually do though degree wise as I have already sent of my application to university and I heard that it is really hard for psychology undergraduates.
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JamesManc
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A clinical psychologist told me the other week, if you want to give therapy to people study psychotherapy and not psychology
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ohemarica
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(Original post by JamesManc)
A clinical psyhologist told me the other week, if you want to give therapy to people study psychotherapy and not psychology
Oh okay. The thing is in colleges they give really bad advice to people because I was told to do a psychology degree then go on to do a masters that's more related to what I want to do.


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JamesManc
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Look at NHS website http://www.nhscareers.nhs.uk/explore...cal-therapies/ it lists all the jobs available in mental health and how you'd become the different jobs
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aylawilde
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There are plenty of 'helping people' jobs related to psychology that aren't clinical or counselling psychologist jobs. Look into IAPT, psychological wellbeing practitioner, graduate mental health worker etc
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ohemarica
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(Original post by aylawilde)
There are plenty of 'helping people' jobs related to psychology that aren't clinical or counselling psychologist jobs. Look into IAPT, psychological wellbeing practitioner, graduate mental health worker etc
Thank you so much. Because I was getting worried that I was doing the wrong course are these jobs in the Nhs? I'm definitely going to look into them.


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ohemarica
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(Original post by JamesManc)
Look at NHS website http://www.nhscareers.nhs.uk/explore...cal-therapies/ it lists all the jobs available in mental health and how you'd become the different jobs
Thank you!! are you training to be a psychologist?


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aylawilde
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(Original post by ohemarica)
Thank you so much. Because I was getting worried that I was doing the wrong course are these jobs in the Nhs? I'm definitely going to look into them.


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A lot of them are in the NHS and as I understand it some of them are in charities/private sector too. There are loads of voluntary things you can do in 'helping people' areas while at uni too - I've done various volunteering projects which are loosely related to mental health. PM me if you like and I can give you some pointers as to bits and bobs you can do
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