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    I apologize if this thread is under the wrong subheading; I am new to TSR and am unsure how to use it fully .

    I really dislike the A Levels I have chosen and have realized this after talking about Universities. Before I started sixth form, I always wanted to do science-based subjects at sixth form (Biology, Chemistry, Physics and Maths). However, I only got C's in these subjects at GCSE, and got A's and B's in most of my other subjects (History, RS, English Lit, English Language etc). At the sixth form I currently go to (a different school to which I studied my GCSES), I study English, History and RS. I chose this in the heat of the moment on GCSE results day, when I went back to the sixth form I planned to go to. They accepted me on a conditional offer, however I applied to do Maths, Biology, Chemistry and Physics. So, when I went back there on results day, I had to change my options or go to my original school that I studied my GCSEs at (who accepted Cs in these subjects, therefore accepted me at their sixth form). The sixth form I go to now wanted B's and A's from me at GCSE in these subjects (the sixth form is a grammar school). Because I did not achieve these grades, I decided to change my A Level courses.

    I really regret this now, because all my life I have wanted a career to do with Science (in Medicine, Pharmacy, maybe even Astrophysics). But I didn't do that well in them at GCSE and decided to do what I thought would be easiest for me at A Level. However, although I did good in them at GCSE, I really dislike learning about these subjects and do not plan to study anything to do with them at Uni, because I simply do not like them.

    I have found out about courses (such as Medicine and Astrophysics) that do not require specific A Levels because they include a "foundation" year where they educate you what you need to know before you start. I have considered doing this, but I have also considered dropping out of my current sixth form and returning to my old school to study these science-based subjects.

    Will I find these subjects too hard? I am just unsure what to do as I really do not like sixth form at the moment. I know I have left it quite late but I thought I would give it some time to see if I could settle into these essay-based subjects. Shall I stick it out 'til the summer and see how I do in these subjects at AS, or shall I just drop out already and start my science subjects at my old school?

    Thanks in advance!
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    (Original post by Robert87)
    I apologize if this thread is under the wrong subheading; I am new to TSR and am unsure how to use it fully .

    I really dislike the A Levels I have chosen and have realized this after talking about Universities. Before I started sixth form, I always wanted to do science-based subjects at sixth form (Biology, Chemistry, Physics and Maths). However, I only got C's in these subjects at GCSE, and got A's and B's in most of my other subjects (History, RS, English Lit, English Language etc). At the sixth form I currently go to (a different school to which I studied my GCSES), I study English, History and RS. I chose this in the heat of the moment on GCSE results day, when I went back to the sixth form I planned to go to. They accepted me on a conditional offer, however I applied to do Maths, Biology, Chemistry and Physics. So, when I went back there on results day, I had to change my options or go to my original school that I studied my GCSEs at (who accepted Cs in these subjects, therefore accepted me at their sixth form). The sixth form I go to now wanted B's and A's from me at GCSE in these subjects (the sixth form is a grammar school). Because I did not achieve these grades, I decided to change my A Level courses.

    I really regret this now, because all my life I have wanted a career to do with Science (in Medicine, Pharmacy, maybe even Astrophysics). But I didn't do that well in them at GCSE and decided to do what I thought would be easiest for me at A Level. However, although I did good in them at GCSE, I really dislike learning about these subjects and do not plan to study anything to do with them at Uni, because I simply do not like them.

    I have found out about courses (such as Medicine and Astrophysics) that do not require specific A Levels because they include a "foundation" year where they educate you what you need to know before you start. I have considered doing this, but I have also considered dropping out of my current sixth form and returning to my old school to study these science-based subjects.

    Will I find these subjects too hard? I am just unsure what to do as I really do not like sixth form at the moment. I know I have left it quite late but I thought I would give it some time to see if I could settle into these essay-based subjects. Shall I stick it out 'til the summer and see how I do in these subjects at AS, or shall I just drop out already and start my science subjects at my old school?

    Thanks in advance!
    Why didn't you achieve good GCSE grades in science subjects? You need to figure that out before you can decide what to do next. If you're not good at science then this will continue through the A Level course, and you'll ultimately have wasted 2 years doing something you enjoy but won't succeed in. However, if it was just poor teachers or a bad exam day then it wouldn't be such a silly decision to continue studying science.

    It also depends what the unis you're looking at ask for. I would be very surprised if your understanding of the medical foundation course is correct - they're usually for people with really high grades at GCSE and A Level, but who didn't take science A Levels. Based on my own understanding, you will not be successful in your application if you have any C's at A Level because they are very popular.
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    (Original post by Juno)
    Why didn't you achieve good GCSE grades in science subjects? You need to figure that out before you can decide what to do next. If you're not good at science then this will continue through the A Level course, and you'll ultimately have wasted 2 years doing something you enjoy but won't succeed in. However, if it was just poor teachers or a bad exam day then it wouldn't be such a silly decision to continue studying science.

    It also depends what the unis you're looking at ask for. I would be very surprised if your understanding of the medical foundation course is correct - they're usually for people with really high grades at GCSE and A Level, but who didn't take science A Levels. Based on my own understanding, you will not be successful in your application if you have any C's at A Level because they are very popular.
    The science department at school was not great and we had to learn the physics course in a month; we didn't even go through all the topics. I hardly revised much either because I got carried away with another extra subject, which is my own fault. I felt very caught up with an extra subject that the school forced me to take (I finished my IT course early so they made me do home economics), which I had to stay behind for at school everyday. Also, I had to get taken out of lessons to complete this home economics coursework- a course that was meant to take 3 years but I only started 2 months before other exams!


    I know it would be a wasted 2 years if I don't succeed, but I feel like the A Levels I'm taking now are going to be a failure also, because I just don't enjoy learning about them. I do, however, enjoy science and I would be willing to put a lot of hard work into it. I appreciate the advice.
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    (Original post by Robert87)
    The science department at school was not great and we had to learn the physics course in a month; we didn't even go through all the topics. I hardly revised much either because I got carried away with another extra subject, which is my own fault. I felt very caught up with an extra subject that the school forced me to take (I finished my IT course early so they made me do home economics), which I had to stay behind for at school everyday. Also, I had to get taken out of lessons to complete this home economics coursework- a course that was meant to take 3 years but I only started 2 months before other exams!


    I know it would be a wasted 2 years if I don't succeed, but I feel like the A Levels I'm taking now are going to be a failure also, because I just don't enjoy learning about them. I do, however, enjoy science and I would be willing to put a lot of hard work into it. I appreciate the advice.
    What are your predicted grades for this year? It might be worth finishing the year, because then you can show you didn't drop out because you were failing. You've got about 5 months left, which isn't much time at all - especially if you can tell yourself you're only doing it to help with future options. I heard a great quote the other days, "if you have a strong enough why you can overcome any how" which I think is appropriate here. Even though you might dislike the current courses, you're doing it to get where you want to be. You need to pass these courses to prove you can succeed at AS Level work.

    But if you are actually failing it might be better to drop out now. People will assume that you dropped out because of bad grades, but at least they'll only assume - you won't have the bad grades to prove it.

    Either way, you've got from now until late August to learn the GCSE science course. Prove to yourself that you can actually learn it if you try. Your teachers may have been the reason you got bad grades, or you may just have had similar results in a different situation. You won't be able to learn the practical side of things, but you can learn enough theory to know if you actually can learn science in the right environment.
    Because if you still aren't understanding it, it's better to learn that before wasting another year. If you can learn, then you'll really help your future grades if you have a good understanding of the basics. You'll also be able to use your knowledge to show why you should be allowed on the A Level course - you might have previously got a C, but now you have a much better understanding.
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    But late isn't it?
 
 
 
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