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    I need your opinion, quite urgently. Like many people my age, I am a floating student. Indecision has infected my mind and I can't seem to get over it. I started university 2 years ago as an overconfident, fresh faced 17 year old who, in retrospect, never really new myself. Being quite confident in my own abilities, I attempted to study the Law. The experience soon left me disgruntled. At that time, I craved knowledge about humanity, not the general principles of South African contract law. So after the first year wrapped I switched to a political science and history BA. I have always loved these fields and I could spend hours reading about the Indian 1857 mutiny and numerous works of Political theory. I can pretty much say with full confidence that I will most likely graduate with an excellent mark (i.e. first class honours). I would love to go on to a top school for Masters and Doctorate study and perhaps one day lecture in these fields. Most importantly I have the desire to do high level policy making and consulting. Here lies the problem. Political science is a discipline that is not taken seriously enough by Governments and NGOs. There is a bit of ignorance towards this field. High level policy making and discussions are almost always carried out by Lawyers and Economists. To illustrate my point, I'm sure that many of you are aware of Hayek and Keynes, but how many of you have even heard of Arendt and Dahl?
    As a solution to this issue, I have laid out 3 possible courses of action.

    1. Get Economics training. I took Maths literacy at school (So no Maths GCSE or A level) which proved to be a major waste of my time- I scored a distinction with minimal effort. To amend my lack of mathematical training I’m thinking of taking Core Maths via DSDC FET to add to my certificate. Having Maths may give me the opportunity to apply for a University economics degree after I complete my BA. My worry is that my lack of natural mathematical ability may render me a mediocre economist. I’m not terrible at maths at all, It’s just that I don’t have the ‘natural’ ability for it like I do for history.

    2. Go back to Law.
    A Law degree can be taken at any time and was originally meant for graduates. By then I would have sharpened my writing skills and had enough knowledge about society to be comfortable studying the law. Hopefully one day I can lecture in constitutional law if I follow this path. The main problem is that this field is getting saturated (outside of South Africa at least) and is full of mediocrity. The pathways to policymaking and academia are also not very clear. Many law lectures are people who simply got tired of practice.

    3. Stay in Political Science and History.
    I could stay in PolSci or History and do well. It’s a field that is also saturated with many bright people but has extremely scarce job openings to teach and research. It’s not as res pectable as economics and worst of all, there are some trained economists who lecture and research PolSci. History is respectable, but the job prospects are VERY limited (more so than PolSci). Masters and Doctorates are quite costly and I need to make an informed investment.
    Please share your opinion.
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    So, appareently life is so comfortable for you UKeans that you are unable to advise. Sigh, no wonder people die trying to get there....
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    Do what you enjoy, life's too short.
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    Cripes, dude, have you perhaps considered that Political Science is not as great as you think?

    I know this is just an advice thread, but to suggest that Economists and Lawyers are not as well equipped as Political Scientists to deal with these issues is ridiculous. Hayek, whom you mentioned, just did not need to formally study Political Science to be bloody good at it. This isn't any reason to suppose he was not twice as good at it as Arendt.
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    OK, so then ECON or LAW or POLITICS? which degree possesses the most utility?
 
 
 
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