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    The government.

    The governments role is to govern the British nation state and enforce the law of Parliament, the Monarchy and the Courts. Since the government took control of education in 1880 its power has become dominant and unquestioned with the British nation state.

    The Monarchy.

    The Monarchy is meant to be an independent institution and have 4 roles Fount of Justice and Law, Defender of the Protestant Faith, Sovereign Head of State and Head of the British Army. Since Parliament has consistently limited the independent income of the Monarchy it has became more beholden to Parliament for its needs.

    The House of Commons.

    The House of Commons is meant to be the only elected institution within the British nation state. As such it forms the government and allows debate between members. It is meant to not only form a government, but also have the ability to limit the government through debate and votes. Currently though political parties which make up the House of Commons stop debate and dissent. This means the House of Commons has no independent way of holding the government to account.

    The House of Lords.

    The House of Lords is their for the aristocracy, Church of England and Judges to have a say in the law and protect their institutions within the law. It is also the second chamber of debate and voting on the law. It should have as much importance as the House of Commons within Parliament. Since reforms to the peerage and appeals system the House of Lords has lost is power and independence to the political parties in the House of Commons.

    The Church of England.

    The Church of England is the established religious institution within the British nation state. It is in place to protect freedom of religious practice within Britain and assert the Protestant faith within the British nation state. It must be independent of the government and the House of Commons. Since the Monarchy and House of Lords have lost their power the Church of England has been open to pressure from the House of Commons and government, it has been unable to protect freedom of religious practice and assert the Protestant faith within the British nation state.

    The Courts.

    The Courts are meant to interpret the law passed by Parliament and Monarchy based on precedent and the specific case. The Courts also enact the punishments for not following the law within the British state. The Courts system was independent until the governmental sentencing guidelines, the change to the appeals system and removal of capital punishment.
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    So what you want is to kill comprehensive state-run education; restore the aristocracy by linking lordships to heritage; limit the democratic process of government to the house of commons alone and crack down on religious practice. A real constitutional monarchy. I'd support the hell out of that.

    You should call it the High Tory party, just to make the conservatives squirm.
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    Sounds awful to me.

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    (Original post by InnerTemple)
    Sounds awful to me.

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    It wouldn't be awful. It would mean no single institution within the British nation state has to much power which it can use to abuse people. It would stop any return to absolutism or puritanism, it would protect the religious and non-religious alike, it would protect the aristocracy and commoners alike. All would be sure of their power and means to protect themselves.

    This means nobody resorts to violence and all support the governmental system. This then means increased freedom, increased justice and in the end peace.
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    (Original post by HigherMinion)
    So what you want is to kill comprehensive state-run education; restore the aristocracy by linking lordships to heritage; limit the democratic process of government to the house of commons alone and crack down on religious practice. A real constitutional monarchy. I'd support the hell out of that.

    You should call it the High Tory party, just to make the conservatives squirm.
    It isn't comprehensive it is secular, and it isn't state run it is government run and it isn't education it is schooling. What isn't known this that before the government took over education 95% of the children in England were already getting an education until 12-14 years. This education was provided mainly by the Church of England and businesses.

    The aristocracy can't be restored many of them have been forced to sell their titles and property because of punitive death taxes imposed on them by the government, and government land seizures in WW1 and WW2. Indeed I have spoken with many families who have been forced to leave their ancestral home for the reasons I just said. So I don't think the aristocracy could be restored, only maintained and overtime increased again. This is why the House of Lords was unable to stop the reforms coming from the House of Commons and the Labour government, it was has been weakened. I do support the return of the House of Lords to hereditary peerage only. However this doesn't mean the children of great or worthy people shouldn't be in the House of Lords. The bar for such an honor must be extremely high though otherwise the House of Lords is devalued. This seems to be what the political parties in the House of Commons are attempting to do, stack the House of Lords with as many people as possible, in doing so the House of Lords is devalued and open to be taken over totally by the political parties in the House of Commons.
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    (Original post by william walker)
    The House of Commons is meant to be the only elected institution within the British nation state.
    Er, no. Not even close. Britain has many elected institutions. Examples are the Welsh Assembly, the Scottish parliament and local councils.

    The Church of England is the established religious institution within the British nation state. It is in place to protect freedom of religious practice within Britain
    The role of the CofE is most definitely not to protect freedom of religious practice in the UK and never has been. In days gone by it rather acted to suppress alternative forms of worship. The sooner it is disestablished the better.
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    (Original post by Good bloke)
    Er, no. Not even close. Britain has many elected institutions. Examples are the Welsh Assembly, the Scottish parliament and local councils.



    The role of the CofE is most definitely not to protect freedom of religious practice in the UK and never has been. In days gone by it rather acted to suppress alternative forms of worship. The sooner it is disestablished the better.
    Those elected bodies aren't the British state, they are devolved from it. So...

    No. Parliament, the Monarchy and Courts did those things. The Church of England never had the power to suppress anything without Parliament and the Monarchy. Also the Church of England is definitely in place to protect freedom of religious practice. It was restored along with the Monarchy after the Puritan dictatorship for that very reason to protect the religious practice of Anglicans. Later this become freedom of religious practice after the Glorious Revolution and English Bill of Rights were enforced.
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    (Original post by william walker)
    It isn't comprehensive it is secular, and it isn't state run it is government run and it isn't education it is schooling. What isn't known this that before the government took over education 95% of the children in England were already getting an education until 12-14 years. This education was provided mainly by the Church of England and businesses.
    Bah, semantics! I don't consider the comprehensive education system to be comprehensive. They set the bar so low it's unbelievable. Makes sense that businesses should be the ones educating their workforce; they seem to have little to gain in teaching post-modern humanities nonsense and the like.
 
 
 
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