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    Hi there, I was looking for some Advice on how to prepare for GCSE Maths?
    I'm 18 years old and next year I'll be doing GCSE again for a 2nd time.

    Last time I got F on a foundation paper. I don't know a lot in maths. I was not in school during years 6 - 9 For personal reasons. So I missed out on some core years. I rejoined a school in year 10, however. As expected I was very far behind so when I made the decision to go back to school, the local council suggested I went to a specialist school. I didn't really want to go there but I guess I didn't have a choice.

    I was rushed through the syllabus of GCSE Maths over a course of a year. I was taught GCSE Science over 2 years. By chance I grasped Science quite well and managed to scape a B. With maths though like I said, I got an F.

    Everything else such as English etc I think I can catch up on. I really want to go to Uni now to do Nursing. I plan to do an Access course at college after I finish doing more GCSES at college.

    Anyway back onto Maths, I'm doing Functional Skills Level 2 currently which I'll think I'll pass just about (since it's calculative) but I'm worried I'm going to struggle when I attempt GCSE again. I really want a C, so I can get into uni. However I feel like it's a long shot, I only know my tables up to 4 just about. and I know my 5s, 11s and 10 times tables. I know tables are like the core of maths and without them it's going to be a real struggle. What is the best way to learn my tables and remember them? I think once I learned them everything else will fall into place. Thanks, Samuel.
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    (Original post by SamuelC)
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    You should check your desired universities' websites to see if they accept the functional skills instead of GCSE.

    Times tables aren't the core of maths. They aren't even that important later on.

    As far as I know, times tables aren't important for GCSE. From what I remember from higher, two of the three papers are calculator papers. The other one won't have as difficult calculations in it. It won't be a problem spending a little time working a calculation out in the exam anyway.
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    But won't you need to know them for things like Division? etc...without knowing them all, won't it make division a lot harder?
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    (Original post by SamuelC)
    But won't you need to know them for things like Division? etc...without knowing them all, won't it make division a lot harder?
    It might be a bit faster if you know everything by heart, but you could just cancel easy common factors such as two or three.
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    Knowing your tables will make division quicker which means you will be able to do some of the first questions more quickly. However to be honest division is only a small area of maths and the GCSE so although they're useful there's plenty more to learn for the GCSE unfortunately!
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    Thanks for the advice guys, and yeah I know that Violet haha. So what your saying is that I don't need to worry about them too much. is it still possible to get a C without knowing them? All
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    Honestly my tables were rubbish - luckily my IGCSE papers were both calculator accepted (?) ones. Personally I'd suggest getting a tutor and going through past year papers. I did maybe 40-50 past year papers the 4 months before my exams and it really helped me


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    Mental arithmetic is still an important life skill. There are many occasions when you see numbers and you just need to do some estimates in your head immediately.

    Do learn the tables. It was normally done by class recital when I was in Kindergarten.

    Got my degree in Mathematics even though I was only dead on average at secondary form 3.

    Learn by rote - chanting like reading a poem, and find a way to get you to recall regularly, such as get a friend to read through a questions list for you to recall. You'll learn very quickly that way.

    Playing a musical instrument is a good indirect way to help you get better at mathematics.
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    Okay thank you very much for the advice guys!
 
 
 
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