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Beavers in the wild in the UK watch

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    Apparently the beavers that have been found in the wild in the UK in the west country may be placed in captivity.

    What do others think about this?
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    I don't think their tree felling and dam building will be welcomed by anglers or landowners, every few years we've got some flooding catastrophe in the south of england I don't think it's possible for us to share the flood-planes with them.

    who's going to pay compensation if beavers cause damage?
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    I've looked into this for a while and I am 100% in favour of reintroducing them.

    They're a native species that only became extinct a few centuries ago. Their tree felling opens up the canopy and encourages regrowth of trees and ground flora. Their dam building creates wetland habitat for lots of species. Their dams can also change the shape of the water table, reducing the impacts of both flooding and drought on the river. There's the potential for tourism as well. They have lots of beneficial impacts.

    They don't do a lot of damage, as they tend to stay right near the riverbank and tend not to wander across land. Their tree felling does not cause deforestation. Their dams do not cause major flooding. And their dams are small and almost always negotiable for migrating fish. Beavers have been reintroduced successfully to over 20 European countries, and the damage was much less than what certain people had claimed it would be.

    I can understand wanting to place them in captivity if their origin is unknown - they could have escaped from somewhere and may need to be tested for diseases. But there should be controlled reintroductions, and these particular ones should be put back if they are found to be disease free.
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    (Original post by barnetlad)
    Apparently the beavers that have been found in the wild in the UK in the west country may be placed in captivity.

    What do others think about this?
    It's absolute *******s to get rid of them , Defra just want to pander to the bloody farmers and Angling Union

    Anyway for my views in full and a bit more detail on the situation I wrote a blog post on it a while back:

    https://politcalecologist.wordpress....e-river-otter/
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    (Original post by Joinedup)
    I don't think their tree felling and dam building will be welcomed by anglers or landowners, every few years we've got some flooding catastrophe in the south of england I don't think it's possible for us to share the flood-planes with them.

    who's going to pay compensation if beavers cause damage?
    You do realise that beavers actually prevent flooding according to peer reviewed science?

    Just putting it out there.
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    (Original post by RFowler)
    I've looked into this for a while and I am 100% in favour of reintroducing them.

    They're a native species that only became extinct a few centuries ago. Their tree felling opens up the canopy and encourages regrowth of trees and ground flora. Their dam building creates wetland habitat for lots of species. Their dams can also change the shape of the water table, reducing the impacts of both flooding and drought on the river. There's the potential for tourism as well. They have lots of beneficial impacts.

    They don't do a lot of damage, as they tend to stay right near the riverbank and tend not to wander across land. Their tree felling does not cause deforestation. Their dams do not cause major flooding. And their dams are small and almost always negotiable for migrating fish. Beavers have been reintroduced successfully to over 20 European countries, and the damage was much less than what certain people had claimed it would be.

    I can understand wanting to place them in captivity if their origin is unknown - they could have escaped from somewhere and may need to be tested for diseases. But there should be controlled reintroductions, and these particular ones should be put back if they are found to be disease free.
    You can test forthe disease just by testing their poo, there is absolutely no need to take them into captivity.
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    (Original post by redferry)
    You can test forthe disease just by testing their poo, there is absolutely no need to take them into captivity.
    I had read something about that, I was just erring on the side of caution as I couldn't remember the exact details. Is it just that one specific disease they're worried about?
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    (Original post by RFowler)
    I had read something about that, I was just erring on the side of caution as I couldn't remember the exact details. Is it just that one specific disease they're worried about?
    yeah - I posted a blog I wrote about it up there which links to all the details
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    (Original post by redferry)
    You do realise that beavers actually prevent flooding according to peer reviewed science?

    Just putting it out there.
    The experience in the USA is that beavers can cause problems for people by blocking up culverts etc.
    http://www.humanesociety.org/animals...ood_Protection


    it's unlikely to be as simple as 'beavers just make everything better for everyone' and it's right to have a good long think about allowing them back because some groups (of people) are likely to view beavers as a cost being imposed upon them.
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    (Original post by Joinedup)
    The experience in the USA is that beavers can cause problems for people by blocking up culverts etc.
    http://www.humanesociety.org/animals...ood_Protection


    it's unlikely to be as simple as 'beavers just make everything better for everyone' and it's right to have a good long think about allowing them back because some groups (of people) are likely to view beavers as a cost being imposed upon them.
    The beavers in the USA are a different species of beaver to those found in Europe. The North American beaver (Castor canadensis) is a different species to the European beaver (Castor fiber). Some of their behaviour is different - e.g. the American beavers build bigger dams than the European ones.
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    (Original post by Joinedup)
    The experience in the USA is that beavers can cause problems for people by blocking up culverts etc.
    http://www.humanesociety.org/animals...ood_Protection


    it's unlikely to be as simple as 'beavers just make everything better for everyone' and it's right to have a good long think about allowing them back because some groups (of people) are likely to view beavers as a cost being imposed upon them.
    American beavers actually produce larger dams than European beavers and are actually generally more destructive overall.

    Evidence from Europe shows beavers to be beneficial to waterways.

    The groups of people that believe beavers will be imposing a cost actually have no idea what they are talking about. The groups in question are the angling lobby (they believe beavers eat fish?! Totally untrue) who would actually benefit from beavers as fish in beaver pools are bigger than those found elsewhere, and the farmers union, who lets be honest, would shoot, kill and poison everything if they were given the opportunity and don't even look out for their own members half the time.

    The government is currently spending millions of pounds dumping logs into waterways to prevent flooding - a job beavers would do for free.
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    Seems the beavers will be returned to their habitat for a 5 year monitoring period provided they are disease free and DWT comes up with a monitoring scheme and a way of dealing with any damage they cause.

    We'll have to see how it turns out.
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    (Original post by Joinedup)
    Seems the beavers will be returned to their habitat for a 5 year monitoring period provided they are disease free and DWT comes up with a monitoring scheme and a way of dealing with any damage they cause.

    We'll have to see how it turns out.
    Who says that? DEFRA?

    Ain't no way those beavers are getting back out again :P
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    (Original post by redferry)
    Who says that? DEFRA?

    Ain't no way those beavers are getting back out again :P
    well it's been quite widely reported since the announcement by NE yesterday afternoon.

    Natural England approves trial release of beavers Natural England
    Natural England’s Board has today, Wednesday 28 January, confirmed that a licence will be issued to Devon Wildlife Trust, permitting the managed release into the wild of beavers currently resident in the River Otter catchment in Devon, on a 5 year trial basis.
    Beaver family allowed to stay in the River Otter BBC
    Natural England has decided that a family of beavers should be allowed to stay living in the River Otter in Devon.
    Devon Beavers can stay living in the wild, natural England rules indi
    England’s first population of wild beavers for 500 years has been saved from a future in captivity, thanks to a landmark decision by the government’s nature watchdog.
    England's beavers allowed to stay in the wild graun
    The first beavers to live in the wild in England for 300 years are to be allowed to continue to swim free in a Devon river as long as it can be proven they are free of disease and of Eurasian origin.
    Wild beavers win their freedom Times
    More than 300 years ago, they were hunted to extinction in England. Now beavers will be officially welcomed back to a river in Devon.
    Beavers can stay in Devon, rules Natural England Torygraph
    Beavers which were discovered living on the River Otter in Devon will be allowed to stay, it was announced today.
    English beaver familiy will remain FREE
    TSR's newspaper of record
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    I'm a really strong believer in parks and wild areas where we just let nature do its thing. Protecting endangered species (and reintroducing some) by protecting their habitats is vital work and in the long term benefits people more than detroying them for short term gain.
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    (Original post by Joinedup)
    well it's been quite widely reported since the announcement by NE yesterday afternoon.

    Natural England approves trial release of beavers Natural England

    Beaver family allowed to stay in the River Otter BBC


    Devon Beavers can stay living in the wild, natural England rules indi


    England's beavers allowed to stay in the wild graun


    Wild beavers win their freedom Times


    Beavers can stay in Devon, rules Natural England Torygraph


    English beaver familiy will remain FREE
    TSR's newspaper of record
    Oh I thought you meant they were being taken into captivity first rather than just being left.

    I give it 6 months before they are shot/poisoned...
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    (Original post by Captain Jack)
    I'm a really strong believer in parks and wild areas where we just let nature do its thing. Protecting endangered species (and reintroducing some) by protecting their habitats is vital work and in the long term benefits people more than detroying them for short term gain.
    This.

    Beavers are good at managing wetlands naturally. They do it far more effectively than we can, more cheaply than we can, and they are doing it all the time. They also do it regardless of land ownership boundaries so they do it over a wider area.

    Compare that to active management projects by people, which may be restricted (in land area and effectiveness) by cost and impeded by apathy of some landowners. You might also have to restrict it to a specific site with the highest potential, otherwise you may struggle to get grant funding for a project. Beavers overcome these problems.

    Conservation organisations could also save money on wetland management, freeing up some of that money for other areas of conservation interest.
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    (Original post by RFowler)
    This.

    Beavers are good at managing wetlands naturally. They do it far more effectively than we can, more cheaply than we can, and they are doing it all the time. They also do it regardless of land ownership boundaries so they do it over a wider area.

    Compare that to active management projects by people, which may be restricted (in land area and effectiveness) by cost and impeded by apathy of some landowners. You might also have to restrict it to a specific site with the highest potential, otherwise you may struggle to get grant funding for a project. Beavers overcome these problems.

    Conservation organisations could also save money on wetland management, freeing up some of that money for other areas of conservation interest.
    Exactly. And on a much, much bigger long term scale - a large percentage of our resources and scientific discoveries, like medicine, have come from nature's ability to evolve and adapt creating new species and chemicals. If we continue to narrow down the locations and opportunities for natural selection to happen, it will negatively impact our lives.
 
 
 
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