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    I am currently an 18 year old, 2nd year college student, studying A2 sociology, A2 religious studies and AS english Language. To get into a "traditional" uni, I'll have to stay on for a third year, which does not appeal to me - I'm not keen on college as a whole, and my friends will be leaving me.

    I haven't done my UCAS application, because i'll only have 2 A levels by the end of this academic year.
    But, I'm thinking of doing a humanities course at OU, instead of staying for a third year. Is this a good idea, academically?
    I can't really afford to go to a traditional uni, and the thought of it terrifies me. I want to stay near home, because my family is here, and I will certainly feel happier here. I am also not very confident that I'll get the grades I need for my first choice of uni, Hull, because I got bad grades at AS level - DDDU - and I don't think I'll do well this year, either.

    I was thinking of studying part-time, whilst volunteering at a local charity shop, to get some work experience. This way, it's cheaper, I can choose what I want to study, I can go as slow or as fast as I want, I can study on my own, and I get to stay near my family.
    I know i'll be missing out on possibly meeting new people, but some social situations make me nervous, as I can be quite shy, and introverted, and not good in front of large crowds.

    So, what I'm trying to say is, does anyone have any advice? And will it matter to any future employers that I'll only have 2 a levels, rather than 3 or 4?
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    (Original post by skasisparadigm)
    I am currently an 18 year old, 2nd year college student, studying A2 sociology, A2 religious studies and AS english Language. To get into a "traditional" uni, I'll have to stay on for a third year, which does not appeal to me - I'm not keen on college as a whole, and my friends will be leaving me.

    I haven't done my UCAS application, because i'll only have 2 A levels by the end of this academic year.
    But, I'm thinking of doing a humanities course at OU, instead of staying for a third year. Is this a good idea, academically?
    I can't really afford to go to a traditional uni, and the thought of it terrifies me. I want to stay near home, because my family is here, and I will certainly feel happier here. I am also not very confident that I'll get the grades I need for my first choice of uni, Hull, because I got bad grades at AS level - DDDU - and I don't think I'll do well this year, either.

    I was thinking of studying part-time, whilst volunteering at a local charity shop, to get some work experience. This way, it's cheaper, I can choose what I want to study, I can go as slow or as fast as I want, I can study on my own, and I get to stay near my family.
    I know i'll be missing out on possibly meeting new people, but some social situations make me nervous, as I can be quite shy, and introverted, and not good in front of large crowds.

    So, what I'm trying to say is, does anyone have any advice? And will it matter to any future employers that I'll only have 2 a levels, rather than 3 or 4?
    Yes it will matter if you've only done 2 A-Levels. In terms of affording university, I'm sure you've heard of student finance? If even then you can't fund university, you could get a job over summer.
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    (Original post by skasisparadigm)
    I am currently an 18 year old, 2nd year college student, studying A2 sociology, A2 religious studies and AS english Language. To get into a "traditional" uni, I'll have to stay on for a third year, which does not appeal to me - I'm not keen on college as a whole, and my friends will be leaving me.

    I haven't done my UCAS application, because i'll only have 2 A levels by the end of this academic year.
    But, I'm thinking of doing a humanities course at OU, instead of staying for a third year. Is this a good idea, academically?
    I can't really afford to go to a traditional uni, and the thought of it terrifies me. I want to stay near home, because my family is here, and I will certainly feel happier here. I am also not very confident that I'll get the grades I need for my first choice of uni, Hull, because I got bad grades at AS level - DDDU - and I don't think I'll do well this year, either.

    I was thinking of studying part-time, whilst volunteering at a local charity shop, to get some work experience. This way, it's cheaper, I can choose what I want to study, I can go as slow or as fast as I want, I can study on my own, and I get to stay near my family.
    I know i'll be missing out on possibly meeting new people, but some social situations make me nervous, as I can be quite shy, and introverted, and not good in front of large crowds.

    So, what I'm trying to say is, does anyone have any advice? And will it matter to any future employers that I'll only have 2 a levels, rather than 3 or 4?


    Hi,

    If you don't feel that you want to go away to university, then the OU could be the best choice for you. Unless you particularly want to do volunteering, you could look for a paid job to do alongside your studies. In terms of only having 2 A levels, this would matter for some jobs (e.g. some finance jobs which have a set minimum A level requirement) but it wouldn't matter for lots of jobs once you've got a degree.

    Good luck!
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    I went to the OU for my first degree, Keele uni for my masters and I'm back at the OU for my third...the OU is a very good uni and rated the highest in student satisfaction. Although I'm bias...you have to decide what you want, but have a look through the student reviews on the OU site...not many unhappy students went to the OU. Finally, cost wise, it's around half that of a brick uni. Best of luck
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    Some unis ask for certain grades, so you might have problems getting into some careers - but it does depend what you're looking to get into.

    But the OU requires a lot of hard work and effort. It's the same as a standard degree, but you're working on your own more so need more private study. You need to be able to motivate yourself. If you're currently struggling you might not be able to study effectively, so doing a degree might not be your best option.

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