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    Basically I learned about hardware in college and my God was it mind numbingly boring learning crap about the north and south bridge , DDR2, and crap along those lines.. BUT I did enjoy the desktop stuff like software issues etc. What can I do in the IT industry that isn't programming and doesn't focus on hardware either?
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    Software testing? Business analyst? Project manager? To name a few.
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    (Original post by TheSilentBang)
    Software testing? Business analyst? Project manager? To name a few.
    Sorry I meant roles that wouldnt require a degree
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    (Original post by Rugar Rell)
    Sorry I meant roles that wouldnt require a degree
    Probably still those same ones. Experience > degree.

    Helpdesk/support?
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    (Original post by Potally_Tissed)
    Probably still those same ones. Experience > degree.

    Helpdesk/support?
    How do i get into help desk I dont want to take the comptia
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    (Original post by Rugar Rell)
    Sorry I meant roles that wouldnt require a degree
    Every single one of them generally needs a degree with larger firms.
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    OP, you won't get a free lunch. You must pay for it or starve.
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    (Original post by Rugar Rell)
    How do i get into help desk I dont want to take the comptia
    Never heard of a place in the UK that requires CompTIA...?

    As for the advice.. Best off going for a helpdesk role.. See what trainee jobs they have going.. Or if you're young enough and don't have a BTEC L3 then try for an advanced apprenticeship.

    Assuming you're still young I'd find it quite unhealthy that you're ruling out programming and hardware as potentials.. You may end up growing to love that side of IT..
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    (Original post by Binary Freak)
    Never heard of a place in the UK that requires CompTIA...?

    As for the advice.. Best off going for a helpdesk role.. See what trainee jobs they have going.. Or if you're young enough and don't have a BTEC L3 then try for an advanced apprenticeship.

    Assuming you're still young I'd find it quite unhealthy that you're ruling out programming and hardware as potentials.. You may end up growing to love that side of IT..
    Are there any programming languages that might be useful in IT support?

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    (Original post by Rugar Rell)
    Are there any programming languages that might be useful in IT support?

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    General IT Support.. No you won't need to know any programming languages.. Just understand the basics of IT.. When you get higher up though you will need a wide variety of skills.. Just depends.. But generally no you won't need programming for IT/Technical Support.

    Honestly though.. If you're not very interested in the hardware or the programming side of things then you really are limiting yourself.. Realistically in the workplace it'll be nothing like what you done in college.. You won't be expected to regurgitate north and south bridge -- It's more knowing.. Okay this is compatible with that and..Okay this plugs into there.

    My advice.. If you haven't already.. Get a cheap/rubbish PC and just practice taking it apart and rebuilding it.. You may end up loving it!
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    "IT Support" is such a wide term. I work in a support team after taking an apprenticeship (certainly with my employer there's no age limit for apprentices and apart from basic GCSEs/etc no major qualification requirements - they are looking for people they can train).

    I did have prior support experiance with windows but this is 100% Unix based. With regards to programming I would recommend what binary freak says above and get an old pc but you can also play with OSs to get some experiance either on said old pc or virtual box is free as are most Linux distributions for you to install.

    A good general background in Linux will give you a massive advantage of you are looking to support servers (web,database etc) as huge numbers of servers simply don't use windows.

    In regards to programming - we don't have to do that at all in my work BUT there is a massive use of shell scripts. Want to backup a server, run a specific job in the scheduler etc etc it's done by shell scripting.

    A lot of incidents end up revolving about either debugging them or fixing issues with them.
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    (Original post by ichak)
    "IT Support" is such a wide term. I work in a support team after taking an apprenticeship (certainly with my employer there's no age limit for apprentices and apart from basic GCSEs/etc no major qualification requirements - they are looking for people they can train).

    I did have prior support experiance with windows but this is 100% Unix based. With regards to programming I would recommend what binary freak says above and get an old pc but you can also play with OSs to get some experiance either on said old pc or virtual box is free as are most Linux distributions for you to install.

    A good general background in Linux will give you a massive advantage of you are looking to support servers (web,database etc) as huge numbers of servers simply don't use windows.

    In regards to programming - we don't have to do that at all in my work BUT there is a massive use of shell scripts. Want to backup a server, run a specific job in the scheduler etc etc it's done by shell scripting.

    A lot of incidents end up revolving about either debugging them or fixing issues with them.
    Really? Servers dont use Windows? Why are all server exams ran by Microsoft?

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    Many servers run IBMs ZOS, Oracle Enterprise Linux, RedHat linux, Sun Solaris, HPs HPUX etc.

    A lot of webservers run the "lamp" stack (Linux, Apache, MySQL,php) and big heavy duty databases such as Oracle database tend to run on big Unix boxes (100s of CPUs, TBs of ram and 100s of terabytes of storage) or big clusters using stuff such as Oracle Real Application Clusters.

    All of the above companies offer certification. However although they cost thousands of pounds to obtain (a week long course for ibm or oracle tends to run to about £2500 excluding board and travel and you need a number of courses to sit each qualification) most people may not have heard of them as the companies don't allow colleges etc to run them. Training must be done by the companies own employees and often only within their own training facilities.
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    (Original post by Rugar Rell)
    Really? Servers dont use Windows? Why are all server exams ran by Microsoft?

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Short answer, they're not, just all the ones you've heard of are.
 
 
 
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