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    Did anyone see Jacksgap's new video about ending the stigma surrounding mental health? If so, thoughts?
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    (Original post by MattCSidd)
    Did anyone see Jacksgap's new video about ending the stigma surrounding mental health? If so, thoughts?
    Do you have a link so people can discuss it?
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    Yeah, sorry
    http://youtu.be/gkZiBnL0h7Y
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    These sort of videos really piss me off.
    I'm sorry, but I honestly don't believe there is a 'stigma' about mental health anymore. Go back in time only ten years, then I'd agree- but in todays culture there is NO stigma.
    There IS a lack of understanding, and a lack of education. When you were little you learnt what a broken arm was, what a heart attack was, and in the same way we should be teaching what a panic attack is. I don't mean in a sit down and lecture way, but in the same way we learnt about most things- shows, teachers, books....

    There is no Stigma, and people should stop pretending there is one. You can find heaps of people to talk to about your problems, and they won't laugh you away or tell you to stop being silly. Go to a doctor. They won't say 'maybe your just having a bad day'....they'll take you seriously.

    If we want Mental Health to be a talking point, we should distinguish between feeling blue, being depressed due to a circumstance, and being ILL. If you've felt terrible, and miserable for a month because luck's turned against you...then your DOWN. And rightly so. Your emotions are working- well done. It's tough and you'll get through. THEN there's being ILL. The difference is like comparing a sprained foot to an amputated leg. It's a LOT different.

    Let the word depressed regain its meaning; and mean being ILL. Not for self-diagnosed self pity.

    JacksGap said we need to 'find medication'. I won't go into that right now...but no we don't. (I'm taking by medication he meant medicine/tablets). We need to find support, and in some cases medication. Let's not jump to it.
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    (Original post by natar)
    These sort of videos really piss me off.
    I'm sorry, but I honestly don't believe there is a 'stigma' about mental health anymore. Go back in time only ten years, then I'd agree- but in todays culture there is NO stigma.
    There IS a lack of understanding, and a lack of education. When you were little you learnt what a broken arm was, what a heart attack was, and in the same way we should be teaching what a panic attack is. I don't mean in a sit down and lecture way, but in the same way we learnt about most things- shows, teachers, books....

    There is no Stigma, and people should stop pretending there is one. You can find heaps of people to talk to about your problems, and they won't laugh you away or tell you to stop being silly. Go to a doctor. They won't say 'maybe your just having a bad day'....they'll take you seriously.

    If we want Mental Health to be a talking point, we should distinguish between feeling blue, being depressed due to a circumstance, and being ILL. If you've felt terrible, and miserable for a month because luck's turned against you...then your DOWN. And rightly so. Your emotions are working- well done. It's tough and you'll get through. THEN there's being ILL. The difference is like comparing a sprained foot to an amputated leg. It's a LOT different.

    Let the word depressed regain its meaning; and mean being ILL. Not for self-diagnosed self pity.

    JacksGap said we need to 'find medication'. I won't go into that right now...but no we don't. (I'm taking by medication he meant medicine/tablets). We need to find support, and in some cases medication. Let's not jump to it.
    There is still stigma surrounding mental health. Maybe not as bad as it was a couple of years ago, but there still is.
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    (Original post by Pathway)
    There is still stigma surrounding mental health. Maybe not as bad as it was a couple of years ago, but there still is.
    The only stigma I see, still around, is in the world of employment- where by saying your history of past health issues might be detrimental. But employers are weird folk.
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    (Original post by natar)
    The only stigma I see, still around, is in the world of employment- where by saying your history of past health issues might be detrimental. But employers are weird folk.
    I agree about employers sometimes discriminate against those that have been/ still are ill, it's like saying "You broke your leg last year, I can't employ you because I don't know you won't break it again next year"

    But I disagree when you say there's no stigma anymore, people are afraid to talk about being ill, not because people will laugh at them or judge them but because they think people are going to laugh at them or judge them because of it.

    I think it's less so about getting people to talk as teaching people not to be afraid of talking.
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    (Original post by natar)
    These sort of videos really piss me off.
    I'm sorry, but I honestly don't believe there is a 'stigma' about mental health anymore. Go back in time only ten years, then I'd agree- but in todays culture there is NO stigma.

    ...

    There is no Stigma, and people should stop pretending there is one.
    You are quite wrong. Maybe the stigma of some conditions isn't as bad as it was ten or twenty years ago but try applying for jobs, dating, making new friends etc. and telling people you have schizophrenia/bipolar/borderline personality disorder and see what happens.

    I have bipolar and even the job centre's disability advisor advised that in her experience I shouldn't mention time in hospital on cvs/application form and that trying to gloss over serious gaps in the cv would be better. In her professional experience - the stigma is real.
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    (Original post by Jay84)
    You are quite wrong. Maybe the stigma of some conditions isn't as bad as it was ten or twenty years ago but try applying for jobs, dating, making new friends etc. and telling people you have schizophrenia/bipolar/borderline personality disorder and see what happens.

    I have bipolar and even the job centre's disability advisor advised that in her experience I shouldn't mention time in hospital on cvs/application form and that trying to gloss over serious gaps in the cv would be better. In her professional experience - the stigma is real.
    What happens? Nothing changes.

    It's funny, if an 'average' person (for lack of a better word) doesn't get a job they believe it's because they didn't try hard enough, didn't have the right same skill set, their physical appearance etc. If someone with a mental health issue doesn't get a job they believe it's because of their mental illness.
    Employers are going to be biased on whose best for the job, and if they sense a risk your not up to scratch, of course they're not going to employe you. It's not that your ill/have been ill...it's weighing you up against the hundreds of others who also applied. If your genuinely better than the previous person for the job, then you'll be picked- issues aside. In before someone links to a 'research study' .

    (On a side note, I've actually talked with my boss about this..because I was interested if it made a difference, and for him it was only if the persons illness affected the day to day job so much the person was unreliable. For my own sake, I asked about previous self harm on show; and had no problems with it- whatever made me more comfortable to do my job. But newer marks would be a no).
    *(Note: I'd say this applies for the vast majority of work, however there are probably certain sectors which are much harder, but I can't comment on because I simply don't know about them. eg being a carer)


    Dating and friendship?
    Seriously?
    If someone stops dating you because you have an illness...all that makes them is a ****. And is just a bad excuse. The same goes for friendships.
    Sure it's going to be harder to 'keep' friends, but if you do or say something in an episode to offend them, then they might take it at face value. Which is understandable.
    If it's harder to make friends and date, then that's down to you.


    All I read was excuses, and that the only sense of stigmatization lies in the job center.
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    I think there is definitely stigma surrounding mental health - my grandparents, for example, know nothing about my mental health problems other than that I once had a panic attack (in reality I've probably had hundreds). When they found out, they told me to stop being silly and sort myself out. I've had a similar response from teachers, friends and even a couple of GPs. So I'd say there definitely is stigma - mental health still isn't treated the same way as physical health. I agree, though, that part of the problem is a lack of awareness and education, which is why I think mental health education should be compulsory in schools.


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    (Original post by natar)
    What happens? Nothing changes.

    It's funny, if an 'average' person (for lack of a better word) doesn't get a job they believe it's because they didn't try hard enough, didn't have the right same skill set, their physical appearance etc. If someone with a mental health issue doesn't get a job they believe it's because of their mental illness.
    Employers are going to be biased on whose best for the job, and if they sense a risk your not up to scratch, of course they're not going to employe you. It's not that your ill/have been ill...it's weighing you up against the hundreds of others who also applied. If your genuinely better than the previous person for the job, then you'll be picked- issues aside. In before someone links to a 'research study' .

    (On a side note, I've actually talked with my boss about this..because I was interested if it made a difference, and for him it was only if the persons illness affected the day to day job so much the person was unreliable. For my own sake, I asked about previous self harm on show; and had no problems with it- whatever made me more comfortable to do my job. But newer marks would be a no).
    *(Note: I'd say this applies for the vast majority of work, however there are probably certain sectors which are much harder, but I can't comment on because I simply don't know about them. eg being a carer)


    Dating and friendship?
    Seriously?
    If someone stops dating you because you have an illness...all that makes them is a ****. And is just a bad excuse. The same goes for friendships.
    Sure it's going to be harder to 'keep' friends, but if you do or say something in an episode to offend them, then they might take it at face value. Which is understandable.
    If it's harder to make friends and date, then that's down to you.


    All I read was excuses, and that the only sense of stigmatization lies in the job centre
    Well in my recent experience of applying for 100s of jobs I personally tried using different CVs - some explaining gaps by admitting I had spent time in psych wards and some just leaving the gaps. I didn't get any response where I made it clear I had bipolar and was looking to get back into work but got a fair few interviews and eventually a job from the other CVs.

    The woman at the job centre was just backig up my experience and confirming that this is common. The fact is that mentioning a mental illness often makes people think 'nutter' and then immediately discard all interest.

    In terms of personal relationships - people are scared of mental illnesses and I have noticed the stigma both with people who have seen me well and then later seen me ill or found out about it.

    I noticed how my schizophrenic uncle was talked about in the community too. He had been acutely ill as a young man and for years afterwards his illness was mostly under control apart from milder symptoms and episodes but he was still called 'schizo' or 'nutter' even if behind his back. I have had the same myself.

    It isnt about feeling sorry for oneself as you put it. It is about being realistic. If I meet new people and am completely open about my last couple of years off the bat, I can see the reaction. Yes it isnt everyone bit with a lot of people there os a real stigma
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    That's understandable about the CV thing, I personally leave that to cover letters/the interview...in the same way, I don't post my age on a CV. If they want to know about gaps, they're gonna have to ask me in person so I can explain and 'sell myself' , as it (personally) sounds lame on paper.

    Thinking about it, I guess people have treated me differently when they found out about MH issues; but it was more not knowing how to handle it than anything else.
    *shrug* I guess I just get riled up by the bigger picture of people complaining
 
 
 
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