Hudl
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Hey guys, I am reading up on stimuli and it says that


When blood pressure is lower than normal the pressure receptor cells detect this and send an impulse to the centre of the medulla oblongata that deals with increasing the heart rate which sends impulses through the sympathetic nervous system however I was wondering... as the sympathetic nervous system inhibits the effector unlike the parasympathetic nervous system which stimulates the effectors how is the heart rates gonna be increased by inhibiting the effector?

or is this a mistake in the Nelson Thornes book?
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indigobluesss
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(Original post by Hudl)
Hey guys, I am reading up on stimuli and it says that


When blood pressure is lower than normal the pressure receptor cells detect this and send an impulse to the centre of the medulla oblongata that deals with increasing the heart rate which sends impulses through the sympathetic nervous system however I was wondering... as the sympathetic nervous system inhibits the effector unlike the parasympathetic nervous system which stimulates the effectors how is the heart rates gonna be increased by inhibiting the effector?

or is this a mistake in the Nelson Thornes book?
Ok, there are millions of effectors in our body, so you need to be more precise :3 I think in this circumstance you're getting yourself confused with something else. (e.g. sympathetic stimulation inhibits much of the gastrointestinal function of the body- in order to put that energy to better use etc.)

Sympathetic stimulation increases both the heart rate and stroke volume, which contributes to increasing the total peripheral pressure (blood pressure).

Make sense?
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Hudl
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(Original post by R Dragon)
Ok, there are millions of effectors in our body, so you need to be more precise :3 I think in this circumstance you're getting yourself confused with something else. (e.g. sympathetic stimulation inhibits much of the gastrointestinal function of the body- in order to put that energy to better use etc.)

Sympathetic stimulation increases both the heart rate and stroke volume, which contributes to increasing the total peripheral pressure (blood pressure).

Make sense?
Yeah thanks, makes sense.....what I realised was that I mixed up the meaning of parasympathetic and sympathetic

para inhibits
sym stimulates

Thanks for the reply though
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indigobluesss
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(Original post by Hudl)
Yeah thanks, makes sense.....what I realised was that I mixed up the meaning of parasympathetic and sympathetic

para inhibits
sym stimulates

Thanks for the reply though

You're most welcome :3 feel free to PM me any cardiovascular/biology related questions if you want
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Asklepios
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(Original post by Hudl)
Yeah thanks, makes sense.....what I realised was that I mixed up the meaning of parasympathetic and sympathetic

para inhibits
sym stimulates

Thanks for the reply though
A better way of thinking about it is that sympathetic is your "fight or flight" response. It prepares your body for that situation - you need your heart to go faster, more air in your lungs, you sweat, increase adrenaline production. Digestion isn't important so your sphincters relax. Parasympathetic is "rest and digest" and generally has the opposite effects to the sympathetic.


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heavyhandscott
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Simple way to remember is paralysis stops people from moving, so inhibits the stimulus ad stops it moving (as much )
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