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    Sorry for posting in the relationships section; I just wanted to remain anonymous for this.


    I'm a second year student at a top uni studying a STEM subject. Academically, I have done very well throughout so it all seems like things look and sound rosy for me in a year's time when I graduate. My friends seem to think I have everything sorted. The problem is, I am at a total loss as to what to do with my life. All this time, I've been fed the same BS about working hard and success will come. What the hell is success? I'm not overly passionate about my degree. I'm doing very well in it but I don't see a future working in a STEM field. I have no genuine passion for anything. When I see my peers talk so enthusiastically about their subject, I feel guilty. I can't even think of something that I would be happy spending every waking hour doing.

    I mean, do people genuinely enjoy corporate **** or do these grads just apply for consulting/banking/FTSE100 grad scheme because it's the done thing? Am I the only one who feels the overwhelming pressure to earn lots just because I've done well at school? This is not supposed to be some sort of gloating FYI. I feel like my entire education has been built up to this final moment-graduation and it's been glorified, when in reality, a job is just to keep a meal on the table.
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    Work for a bank.

    Invest bonus for 7 years until it can't be clawed back.

    You will now very likely have a steady flow of income from trading, you'll probably be 30 at this point.

    You can do any job you want now provided all other conditions have been met e.g you could work as a teacher and enjoy the provided holidays as well as having the knowledge that if you lose everything in trading, you still have a steady income. Or alternatively you could start your own business e.g. online and choose your hours.

    This is not professional advice but merely an idea... and probably an unrealistic one
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    Success= you can no longer be told by another person that you are inferior, rather you are their equal or superior in society e.g. obtaining celebrity status or becoming world renowned for starting up a successful business such as Facebook.
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    A corporate job could be fun if you thrive on competing with others and enjoy pushing yourself to new boundaries.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Sorry for posting in the relationships section; I just wanted to remain anonymous for this.


    I'm a second year student at a top uni studying a STEM subject. Academically, I have done very well throughout so it all seems like things look and sound rosy for me in a year's time when I graduate. My friends seem to think I have everything sorted. The problem is, I am at a total loss as to what to do with my life. All this time, I've been fed the same BS about working hard and success will come. What the hell is success? I'm not overly passionate about my degree. I'm doing very well in it but I don't see a future working in a STEM field. I have no genuine passion for anything. When I see my peers talk so enthusiastically about their subject, I feel guilty. I can't even think of something that I would be happy spending every waking hour doing.

    I mean, do people genuinely enjoy corporate **** or do these grads just apply for consulting/banking/FTSE100 grad scheme because it's the done thing? Am I the only one who feels the overwhelming pressure to earn lots just because I've done well at school? This is not supposed to be some sort of gloating FYI. I feel like my entire education has been built up to this final moment-graduation and it's been glorified, when in reality, a job is just to keep a meal on the table.
    Hey, I'm haven't started uni yet so you might not think much of me saying that I can relate to how you are feeling but i think im in a similar position. I have applied to do engineering because I'm good at maths and sciences but I really seem to have no interest in anything at the moment. Everyday I question what success is and what I want to achieve in life but I have no answers.
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    Hardly anyone is truly passionate about their degree..dnt feel pressured to b... some people r passonate about sex that doesnt mean theyll become porn stars
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    (Original post by study_smart786)
    Hardly anyone is truly passionate about their degree..dnt feel pressured to b... some people r passonate about sex that doesnt mean theyll become porn stars
    That's just it. If people aren't that passionate about their degree, do they just fall into a job in that sector because they can't think of anything else to do?
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    (Original post by polpo)
    Work for a bank.

    Invest bonus for 7 years until it can't be clawed back.

    You will now very likely have a steady flow of income from trading, you'll probably be 30 at this point.

    You can do any job you want now provided all other conditions have been met e.g you could work as a teacher and enjoy the provided holidays as well as having the knowledge that if you lose everything in trading, you still have a steady income. Or alternatively you could start your own business e.g. online and choose your hours.

    This is not professional advice but merely an idea... and probably an unrealistic one
    If I worked for a bank, I could very well end my life before 30. You're missing the point. Does any graduate do any job for its intrinsic value? Ie an actual interest in the job at hand or is it just, as you've put, the paycheck that enables you the freedom to do whatever the hell you want?
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    It depends on what you do. If I had gone into somehting to do with banking, finance or accountancy, like a lot of my fellow graduates did after our maths degree, I would have felt like I had sold out.
    Instead I did what I wanted to do: went into teaching. I was skint and still am, and as much as I moan about it (the workload, having no money/time to do anything) I wouldn't change it. (I would go back and do better in my GCSEs/Alevels/Degree) but not actually change my decision to become a teacher and not go straight into a job.
    However, if I didn't get funded whilst I was doing my PGCE I don't know if I would still have felt the same as I would have had to either work, or I would have had to move back to my original hometown and do my PGCE there.
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    (Original post by polpo)
    Success= you can no longer be told by another person that you are inferior, rather you are their equal or superior in society e.g. obtaining celebrity status or becoming world renowned for starting up a successful business such as Facebook.
    I beg to differ
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    Its difficult to decide what to do with one's life. For me, originally I wanted to be a singer. But then I ended up working in consultancy. It is not easy because there are options.

    I suggest that you don't worry too much about what you are going to do after you graduate. Just enjoy the time that you have left at university. Try to push yourself to do well in your degree. If you are successful in your degree, then you know you can apply yourself and succeed against adversity. And that is a valuable skill for when you do end up deciding what to do with your life.
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    (Original post by elldeegee)
    It depends on what you do. If I had gone into somehting to do with banking, finance or accountancy, like a lot of my fellow graduates did after our maths degree, I would have felt like I had sold out.
    Instead I did what I wanted to do: went into teaching. I was skint and still am, and as much as I moan about it (the workload, having no money/time to do anything) I wouldn't change it. (I would go back and do better in my GCSEs/Alevels/Degree) but not actually change my decision to become a teacher and not go straight into a job.
    However, if I didn't get funded whilst I was doing my PGCE I don't know if I would still have felt the same as I would have had to either work, or I would have had to move back to my original hometown and do my PGCE there.
    You're right about the selling out. I feel the same way but there just seems to be a pressure to take on a 'well respected' job JUST BECAUSE academically I have done well. My peers who have also done well have already decided that law/banking/consulting etc will be the natural route, without so much a flicker of doubt. Maybe it's just the norm, when you look to see what your parents did, and choosing a career along the same sort of lines is just the default option.
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    (Original post by sunnydespair)
    Its difficult to decide what to do with one's life. For me, originally I wanted to be a singer. But then I ended up working in consultancy. It is not easy because there are options.

    I suggest that you don't worry too much about what you are going to do after you graduate. Just enjoy the time that you have left at university. Try to push yourself to do well in your degree. If you are successful in your degree, then you know you can apply yourself and succeed against adversity. And that is a valuable skill for when you do end up deciding what to do with your life.
    Thanks. There are far too many options now, especially for my generation.You say you 'ended up' as if it were the last resort. This is sort of what I mean. Are you happy that you fell into consultancy, knowing that you actually wanted to be a singer? Or did you just reach a point in your life when you thought, '**** it. it'll pay the bills and provide a nice lifestyle.'?
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    You're right about the selling out. I feel the same way but there just seems to be a pressure to take on a 'well respected' job JUST BECAUSE academically I have done well. My peers who have also done well have already decided that law/banking/consulting etc will be the natural route, without so much a flicker of doubt. Maybe it's just the norm, when you look to see what your parents did, and choosing a career along the same sort of lines is just the default option.
    Only do that if that what makes you happy. In the end, it's your happiness that matters. There will likely be people who will judge you, but then think to yourself: do those people's opinions matter? Are these opinions from reasons that would matter (if that makes sense).

    There is pressure to go into a "top job" because you've done well.

    If you start a job now that you didn't want to get into in the first place you get three outcomes:
    You love it and you snever think of moving jobs.
    You hate it and can't wait to get out.
    You neither love it or hate it and it becomes routine.

    For the final two cases you will then need to pluck up the courage/motivation to find a new job.

    If you know what you want to go into, go for it!
    If you don't know what you want to do and you can't afford to wait and figure this out then find a job and keep thinking about what you actually want and when you figure it out, go for that!
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Thanks. There are far too many options now, especially for my generation.You say you 'ended up' as if it were the last resort. This is sort of what I mean. Are you happy that you fell into consultancy, knowing that you actually wanted to be a singer? Or did you just reach a point in your life when you thought, '**** it. it'll pay the bills and provide a nice lifestyle.'?
    Actually I don't earn that much, I am working for a small firm...Its something that I do because it pays the bills, and I do like working on projects and coming up with solutions to different problems. I would prefer to be a singer but I don't think I'm talented enough, but its something that I do pursue a bit in my free time.

    I used to like the simplicity of student life, I would go to university, go back home, go back to university, repeat..., I would rarely go anything outside those confines, because all my social activities were centered in the university area. I think its important to have some kind of routine anyway, and life becomes much more manageable and focused.
 
 
 
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