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    So I love Computer Science and I also love the humanities such as Anthropology, Archaeology, and Philosophy is there any safe A level combinations that would allow me to do either? (I would like to avoid taking maths or physics at A level yes I know that decreases the options for computer science)

    Thankyou for your suggestions
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    If you're avoiding maths and physics, then that severely limits your options with regards to a CS degree. The others all seem fairly arts-y so subjects like languages, history, philosophy, sociology might be good for that? Anthropology can be quite science-y depending on the course so biology might be useful if you're interested in that. Philosophy quite heavily involves the study of logic and logical methods, so I would've thought maths is useful for that, but I don't think unis require it.
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    Thanks for reply
    So I'm thinking :

    Computing
    Electronics
    Biology
    History

    Which one should I just take to AS level?
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    (Original post by MarxistCarrot)
    Thanks for reply
    So I'm thinking :

    Computing
    Electronics
    Biology
    History

    Which one should I just take to AS level?
    I would go with computing but what are your other options

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    College does all the main A levels. I would like to avoid maths and physics though.
    The ones I have told you are the ones I really want to do.
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    [QUOTE=MarxistCarrot;53318983]College does all the main A levels. I would like to avoid maths and physics though.
    The ones I have told you are the ones I really want to do.
    Unless you're applying to the top ten universities there isn't a specific requirement for comp Sci but maths and physics would help for the maths side. I would say pick computing and mix and match your choices
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    why not take Computing, Electronics and Philosophy to A2 and maybe try Maths for AS, or you could try a softer version of maths like A level Use of Maths or Statistics, but i wouldnt worry too much if you dont have maths, i went on to study CompSci at a good uni without Maths A level, its just something to prove to universities that you can do maths, hardly any of the maths in CompSci is covered at A level anyway

    Hope this helps
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    If you want to study CS, why wouldn't you do Maths and Further Maths as that is essentially what CS is. If you don't like it now and don't want to do it, you almost certainly wouldn't like it at university.
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    look at the computing course but if it isnt covering a programming language or some computer architecture basics then you might want to consider electronics as we cover a lot of electronics based stuff in computer science
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    (Original post by Kolasinac138)
    If you want to study CS, why wouldn't you do Maths and Further Maths as that is essentially what CS is. If you don't like it now and don't want to do it, you almost certainly wouldn't like it at university.
    This is only true for the more theoretical courses, generally only at the top end. Birmingham has a well respected CS dept. that doesn't even NEED A level maths (though it would be useful of course). Though the fundamentals of CS are certainly steeped in maths, not every course goes into the absolute mathematical details of things such as turing machines, and advanced proofs and such. Of course, M+FM+Phys are the absolute best subjects you could take as they train you to be logical/mathematical but by no means are they required.
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    (Original post by TVIO)
    This is only true for the more theoretical courses, generally only at the top end. Birmingham has a well respected CS dept. that doesn't even NEED A level maths (though it would be useful of course). Though the fundamentals of CS are certainly steeped in maths, not every course goes into the absolute mathematical details of things such as turing machines, and advanced proofs and such. Of course, M+FM+Phys are the absolute best subjects you could take as they train you to be logical/mathematical but by no means are they required.
    They are pretty much required for top 10 and maybe top 15 universities in the UK.
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    (Original post by Kolasinac138)
    They are pretty much required for top 10 and maybe top 15 universities in the UK.
    Really aren't mate. Helpful, certainly. And you could make a case for maths, but not for FM+Phys. No university NEEDs both of those (though the odds would certainly be against you). I looked at most of the top 15 when I was applying, and most of them specified maths, but not what the other subjects should be (Imperial and Cambridge did have a list of 'suitable' subjects though I think).
 
 
 
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