I want to take get a degree in History, how can I then go on to do a law degree?

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Tahab_1
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I'm currently doing my GCSEs and I'm predicted B-A*s in all of them, I believe I can do well in them. I then want to preferably go on to A - Levels and study History, Religous Studies, Computer Science and Maths (Somewhat of a back up plan) If I were to get into say, Kings College or LSE, what can I then do to go onto Law?

I don't know a lot of about the key terms, and what BAs are and stuff, so if people could explain, I'd appreciate it.

Thank you.
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Klix88
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If you wanted to do a second undergrad degree, you would have to fund it entirely yourself. Student Finance will only help with a first degree unless your second is one of the few exemptions e.g. medical/nursing. You may need to look at a postgrad entry Law conversion course instead.

Is there a reason that you wouldn't apply for a Law degree straight after school? Your proposed A Level subjects wouldn't rule it out.
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The Blind Monk
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The BA is a normal bachelor's level degree in an arts subject like history. A LLB is the law equivalent.

There are two normal ways to satisfy the academic requirements to become a lawyer. The first is to do an LLB. The second is to do some other type of degree and then do the law conversion known the the Graduate Diploma in Law (GDL.) This is done in one year (or two years part time.)

Getting onto the GDL at the two main providers (University of Law and BPP) is very easy so long as you have a 2.1 in your degree and the funds to pay. It is possible to get a Training Contract (TC) at some law firms who will pay for your GDL and the Legal Practice Course (LPC) and get you a job as a trainee solicitor afterwards so long as you meet certain conditions.

As the previous poster stated, you would probably have to fund a second degree yourself and there are not too many sources who would pay for it. There are a few people I know who did LLBs after their first degree in history. It is possible to get onto a 'senior status' LLB at a number of universities which are law degrees done in two years at a number of places including Oxford and Cambridge.

Your question is very open ended so it is quite difficult to know how much detail you need. Ask away if you have any questions.
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Wattsy
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The Graduate Diploma in Law (GDL) is a 1 year law conversion course you could take having completed history at undergraduate level. That way you'd have a qualifying law degree and have completed an undergraduate degree in history without having to do two degrees and take 6 years to do so. You'd have achieved what you wanted in four.

What Blind Monk says basically, his post is just a better version of this one.
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Tahab_1
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(Original post by Klix88)
If you wanted to do a second undergrad degree, you would have to fund it entirely yourself. Student Finance will only help with a first degree unless your second is one of the few exemptions e.g. medical/nursing. You may need to look at a postgrad entry Law conversion course instead.

Is there a reason that you wouldn't apply for a Law degree straight after school? Your proposed A Level subjects wouldn't rule it out.
I'm confused on the matter, a lawyer came into our school and gave my class a small introduction he told us he took History as a degree, then crammed Law into one year straight after, I'd prefer to have a dual degree, and I want to get far in Law, I want to become a barrister in particular.

Do you know what he was talking about? He took his History Degree and then took a law degree for a single year?
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Tahab_1
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(Original post by The Blind Monk)
The BA is a normal bachelor's level degree in an arts subject like history. A LLB is the law equivalent.

There are two normal ways to satisfy the academic requirements to become a lawyer. The first is to do an LLB. The second is to do some other type of degree and then do the law conversion known the the Graduate Diploma in Law (GDL.) This is done in one year (or two years part time.)

Getting onto the GDL at the two main providers (University of Law and BPP) is very easy so long as you have a 2.1 in your degree and the funds to pay. It is possible to get a Training Contract (TC) at some law firms who will pay for your GDL and the Legal Practice Course (LPC) and get you a job as a trainee solicitor afterwards so long as you meet certain conditions.


As the previous poster stated, you would probably have to fund a second degree yourself and there are not too many sources who would pay for it. There are a few people I know who did LLBs after their first degree in history. It is possible to get onto a 'senior status' LLB at a number of universities which are law degrees done in two years at a number of places including Oxford and Cambridge.

Your question is very open ended so it is quite difficult to know how much detail you need. Ask away if you have any questions.

That's it! Graduate Diploma in Law (GDL.) I understand I'd have to fund it myself, and thankfully, that wouldn't be a problem. Can you explain a bit more? If I were to take a History Degree then do GDL, how will I go through with this process?
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Tahab_1
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(Original post by Wattsy)
The Graduate Diploma in Law (GDL) is a 1 year law conversion course you could take having completed history at undergraduate level. That way you'd have a qualifying law degree and have completed an undergraduate degree in history without having to do two degrees and take 6 years to do so. You'd have achieved what you wanted in four.

What Blind Monk says basically, his post is just a better version of this one.
Thanks, so take History, for the 3 years then take on Law, would that set me back? Compared to people who have actually taken Law for their degree?
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Klix88
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(Original post by Tahab_1)
I'm confused on the matter, a lawyer came into our school and gave my class a small introduction he told us he took History as a degree, then crammed Law into one year straight after, I'd prefer to have a dual degree, and I want to get far in Law, I want to become a barrister in particular.

Do you know what he was talking about? He took his History Degree and then took a law degree for a single year?
That's just the route he took into Law. You don't *have* to do History undergrad then Law conversion. There are other routes, including doing a Law undergrad to begin with and skipping the History degree altogether.
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Tahab_1
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(Original post by Klix88)
That's just the route he took into Law. You don't *have* to do History undergrad then Law conversion. There are other routes, including doing a Law undergrad to begin with and skipping the History degree altogether.
I see, if I were to do History then Law, will that mean I will have two degrees? Wouldn't having two degrees be beneficial towards status when applying for firms?
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larusfuscus
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Doing the GDL won't set you back if you want to be a solicitor - provided that at the very minimum you get a 2:1 from a 'good' university for your first degree. It will, however, cost more. If you want to be a commercial lawyer some big firms will sponsor you for the GDL but to get a training contract at these is, to say the least, very competitive.

There is another way, which is to do a 'senior status' law degree after your first degree. I think that this gives you an actual degree in law after two years (the GDL is a one year conversion course). However it would mean funding two more years of study after your first degree.

Either way - law degree, GDL, senior status - you have to do the Legal Practice Course (or the BVC if you want to be a barrister) before you start training.

Edit: I see that you want to be a barrister - in that case I would do a law degree or senior status if you can afford it. The bar involves much more 'law' than being a solicitor and GDL/BVC probably would be a disadvantage. Of course if you are brilliant and get an Oxbridge first for your history you will be ok in any event. But the bar, at the good sets, is even more competitive that solicitors.
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Tahab_1
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(Original post by larusfuscus)
Doing the GDL won't set you back if you want to be a solicitor - provided that at the very minimum you get a 2:1 from a 'good' university for your first degree. It will, however, cost more. If you want to be a commercial lawyer some big firms will sponsor you for the GDL but to get a training contract at these is, to say the least, very competitive.

There is another way, which is to do a 'senior status' law degree after your first degree. I think that this gives you an actual degree in law after two years (the GDL is a one year conversion course). However it would mean funding two more years of study after your first degree.

Either way - law degree, GDL, senior status - you have to do the Legal Practice Course (or the BVC if you want to be a barrister) before you start training.
I see, fortunately the extra cost isn't a big problem. So this would allow me to become a Solicitor, however I'd like to be a Barrister, so once I've got the two degrees I would then have to do the BVC to become a Barrister! Would this mean I'd have two degrees?
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Wattsy
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(Original post by Tahab_1)
Thanks, so take History, for the 3 years then take on Law, would that set me back? Compared to people who have actually taken Law for their degree?
No, the GDL is by all accounts an intense year, you do the 7 (I think) compulsory modules for an LLB in one year, you don't do the optional modules that other law students have over their more flexible degree but it won't set you back. If the degree is a STEM subject or teaches a different skill set to law then it can actually work to an applicants advantage depending on the area of law they want to get into. I'm not sure that's really applicable to history though. History teaches the same kind of skills as law. You're at no disadvantage though. Employers know the GDL is hard.
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larusfuscus
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(Original post by Tahab_1)
I see, fortunately the extra cost isn't a big problem. So this would allow me to become a Solicitor, however I'd like to be a Barrister, so once I've got the two degrees I would then have to do the BVC to become a Barrister! Would this mean I'd have two degrees?
You can do the GDL and then the BVC to become a barrister - but you would need to get pupillage, which is the hard part. If you do the GDL you will not have two degrees, the GDL is a one year conversion. I think some providers (the 'University of Law') will give you a 'degree' if you do the GDL and LPC (maybe the BVC too) plus some extra work. This is not highly regarded, or regarded at all, by solicitors (I don't know about the bar).

I do think that for the bar a law degree or senior status degree is a better option than the GDL. But for you at this stage I would just focus on getting good GCSEs and then good A levels and see how you feel in a couple of years.
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Klix88
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(Original post by Tahab_1)
I see, if I were to do History then Law, will that mean I will have two degrees? Wouldn't having two degrees be beneficial towards status when applying for firms?
No. It will make you look like a) a perpetual student who isn't that keen on working, and b) someone who can't make up their mind what they want to do.

If you're serios about Law now, there's no point diverting yourself with two undergrad degrees.

If you want to hedge your bets, then you can do the History degree followed by the one year postgrad Law conversion. It'll just take longer than going straight into undergrad Law.

Bear in mind that it's standard to charge International tuition fees for a second undergrad degree, even for Home/UK students. This could easily amount to £45,000+ in fees alone if you did Law as a second undergrad degree. For most people, that simply wouldn't be financially feasible.
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Tahab_1
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(Original post by Klix88)
No. It will make you look like a) a perpetual student who isn't that keen on working, and b) someone who can't make up their mind what they want to do.

If you're serios about Law now, there's no point diverting yourself with two undergrad degrees.

If you want to hedge your bets, then you can do the History degree followed by the one year postgrad Law conversion. It'll just take longer than going straight into undergrad Law.

Bear in mind that it's standard to charge International tuition fees for a second undergrad degree, even for Home/UK students. This could easily amount to £45,000+ in fees alone if you did Law as a second undergrad degree. For most people, that simply wouldn't be financially feasible.
I see, what subjects are best to pick to go straight into Law? You've completely changed my mind!

Is History, RE, Computer Science, Maths better

Or History, RE, Government and Politics, Computer science better?
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The Blind Monk
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(Original post by Tahab_1)
I understand I'd have to fund it myself, and thankfully, that wouldn't be a problem. Can you explain a bit more? If I were to take a History Degree then do GDL, how will I go through with this process?
Getting into the GDL at BPP or UoL is pretty simple. If you have a 2.1 in your undergrad and the cash to do it, you automatically get in to BPP. I am reasonably sure the UoL admissions process is no more strenuous really.

Many prospective barristers do the GDL at City Law School or Kaplan which I am told is more academic and difficult but I honestly don't know whether this makes much (if any) difference to your chances of pupillage.

I would not try and dissaude you from doing a history degree as I did one and I had a great time. I also felt that it did not really close any doors that I was interested in. I also personally think it is easier to stand out by getting a First/Dean's List/academic prizes/extra curricular wise on a history degree vs a law degree at a similar institution.

However, I personally do not feel that it is a big advantage to get an 'extra' degree through the top up procedure for the GDL somewhere like UoL or BPP. It might make you happy to have BA, LLB after your name and it might be useful in other countries but I don't think top English sets will see it as a benefit over a law degree. I imagine (but don't know) that the 2 year senior status LLB from either Oxford or Cambridge would stand you in good stead for pupillage as far as academics are concerned but they are very competitive to get into and probably require a first as well as a good academic CV.

(Original post by Tahab_1)
Thanks, so take History, for the 3 years then take on Law, would that set me back? Compared to people who have actually taken Law for their degree?
I should preface what I say with the fact that I'm on the solicitor path as opposed to being a barrister. So I really don't know as much about getting pupillage as perhaps I should if I am giving out advice.

This link will be much more authoritative: Chambers Student

For the 'golden path' of minimum (non law) time you would apply to a history degree through UCAS. Then during your final year you would apply to a GDL provider (many aspiring barristers go to City Law School.) This would be the 'academic' stage of your training finished. Hopefully, you would have acquired intern experience of some sort, including a number of mini-pupillages by the time you reach this stage.

You could then apply for the BPTC during your GDL year. Ideally you would get a major scholarship (or exhibition) from one of the Inns of Court for the BPTC. This would help your financial situation but also show that you are a serious candidate for pupillage. I think you can apply for pupillage at this stage but I'm not sure.

In an ideal world, after your degrees/mini-pupillages/GDL/BPTC (with scholarship)/pupillage you would get tenancy at a set you want to work at.

I hope this helps: read the Chambers Student link. It will answer a lot of your questions.
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Klix88
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(Original post by Tahab_1)
I see, what subjects are best to pick to go straight into Law? You've completely changed my mind!

Is History, RE, Computer Science, Maths better

Or History, RE, Government and Politics, Computer science better?
Law degrees consider a very wide range of A Level subjects. I think Maths would stand you in good stead, as it develops logical thinking skills. The most important thing is that Law is a competitive degree subject. You should go with the subjects in which you're likely to get the best grades.

All unis will have their degree requirements online these days. It's worth you having a look round a few Law degree web pages, just to set your mind at rest.
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Tahab_1
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The Russel Group Unis all tend to be A*AA, which I believe I can get if I work hard at it! However my Maths grade may not be up at a definite A, which is why I'm skeptical on it. I have Computer Science for logical thinking skills, which is why I abandoned maths, by bringing in Government and Politics as well!
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Tahab_1
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(Original post by The Blind Monk)
Getting into the GDL at BPP or UoL is pretty simple. If you have a 2.1 in your undergrad and the cash to do it, you automatically get in to BPP. I am reasonably sure the UoL admissions process is no more strenuous really.

Many prospective barristers do the GDL at City Law School or Kaplan which I am told is more academic and difficult but I honestly don't know whether this makes much (if any) difference to your chances of pupillage.

I would not try and dissaude you from doing a history degree as I did one and I had a great time. I also felt that it did not really close any doors that I was interested in. I also personally think it is easier to stand out by getting a First/Dean's List/academic prizes/extra curricular wise on a history degree vs a law degree at a similar institution.

However, I personally do not feel that it is a big advantage to get an 'extra' degree through the top up procedure for the GDL somewhere like UoL or BPP. It might make you happy to have BA, LLB after your name and it might be useful in other countries but I don't think top English sets will see it as a benefit over a law degree. I imagine (but don't know) that the 2 year senior status LLB from either Oxford or Cambridge would stand you in good stead for pupillage as far as academics are concerned but they are very competitive to get into and probably require a first as well as a good academic CV.


I should preface what I say with the fact that I'm on the solicitor path as opposed to being a barrister. So I really don't know as much about getting pupillage as perhaps I should if I am giving out advice.

This link will be much more authoritative: Chambers Student

For the 'golden path' of minimum (non law) time you would apply to a history degree through UCAS. Then during your final year you would apply to a GDL provider (many aspiring barristers go to City Law School.) This would be the 'academic' stage of your training finished. Hopefully, you would have acquired intern experience of some sort, including a number of mini-pupillages by the time you reach this stage.

You could then apply for the BPTC during your GDL year. Ideally you would get a major scholarship (or exhibition) from one of the Inns of Court for the BPTC. This would help your financial situation but also show that you are a serious candidate for pupillage. I think you can apply for pupillage at this stage but I'm not sure.

In an ideal world, after your degrees/mini-pupillages/GDL/BPTC (with scholarship)/pupillage you would get tenancy at a set you want to work at.

I hope this helps: read the Chambers Student link. It will answer a lot of your questions.
Thanks a lot! That link really did help! What subjects are preferred to apply to a Russel Group Like Kings College? I was thinking having:

Either:

History, Government and Politics, Computer Science, Religion Studies

OR:

History, Maths, Computer Science, Religion Studies

Maths is one of my weakest subjects and I've only made the jump from C to B in my current progress and I hope to get an A in my actual GCSE exams but, which would be ideal? If the one with Maths is ideal I'll work harder and aim for an A.
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Josb
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Combined honours in Law and History?

http://www.ed.ac.uk/schools-departme...rs/law-history
http://www.exeter.ac.uk/undergraduate/degrees/flexible/
http://www.soas.ac.uk/law/programmes/balawand/
http://www.leeds.ac.uk/info/125070/w.../joint_honours
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