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    Good evening to all the swell people here at TSR! I'm asking a question on behalf of my younger brother. He started doing a degree in computer science (a subject he had done well in at A-Level), but over the first year found out that it's not something he wants to continue with. While he's talented with the work, it's really bringing him down, and he wants to change his course.

    He is mid-way through his second year right now, and I and the rest of my family have only just found out that he's unhappy with his situation - he kept going after first year as he was worried about disappointing us. We've let him know that we wouldn't be at all disappointed if he switched subject and how his happiness is what matters, so he has started trying to make a change at the end of this year.

    Unfortunately, when he spoke to his university's student advice team, he learnt that Student Finance England only cover four years of undergraduate study (I think?), so unless he was able to switch to a new course and start on its second year, he'd be spending at least one year without Student Finance funding. As of now, he isn't sure how he'd manage that, so he's planning to keep going on his current course, but I really want to help him.

    I'm certain that his case isn't unique. If people, for whatever reason, end up spending more than their Student Finance-funded years doing undergraduate study, how do they fund the excess? Are the tuition fees paid back upfront, or is this still done gradually after reaching an income threshold? Thanks for any help with this question!

    tl;dr - How do people find funding if they exceed their Student Finance covered years? Are tuition fees in this situation still paid in the normal way?
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    Would this new course be an NHS course? Because the rules are different for that.
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    I'm afraid not - right now he's thinking of law, but I think he's also open to maths, accountancy and other subjects in that sort of area.

    Although how are the rules different in that area, if I might ask?
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    (Original post by Mallard)
    tl;dr - How do people find funding if they exceed their Student Finance covered years? Are tuition fees in this situation still paid in the normal way?
    In your brother's situation, if he starts a new three year degree from scratch, he will get a minimum Maintenance Loan only in his first year and will have to pay his own tuition fees. His full SF loans/grant entitlements will kick back in for the second and third years. There are no other loans available which would cover that first year.

    I was in this position, having done two years at uni after school. I couldn't afford to try again until my forties, once I'd paid off my mortgage and saved some money to support myself through the first year.

    ETA: As per Juichiro's post below, my second attempt was on the £3000 fees. I wouldn't/couldn't have done it at £9000 a year.
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    (Original post by Mallard)
    x

    As far as I know people leave uni for a while to work for a couple of years and then go back. People like Mad Vlad did that. But that was when it was feasible (when fees were below 3K) now that fees are 9K it is not feasible. So realistically, unless you have 18K ready for him, your brother has two choices: leave uni without a degree or stay at uni and finish his degree. Once he finishes his degree, he can do a masters in something he likes (for less than 18K).
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    (Original post by Klix88)
    In your brother's situation, if he starts a new three year degree from scratch, he will get a minimum Maintenance Loan only in his first year and will have to pay his own tuition fees. His full SF loans/grant entitlements will kick back in for the second and third years. There are no other loans available which would cover that first year.

    I was in this position, having done two years at uni after school. I couldn't afford to try again until my forties, once I'd paid off my mortgage and saved some money to support myself through the first year.
    The dark truth of British HE: there is no space for second thoughts so you better choose wisely and carefully what you want to do.
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    Part time? Ok, it will take longer, but it will be more affordable and he could work alongside his degree.
 
 
 
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