Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
x Turn on thread page Beta

Why do people that like Maths usually like Physics? watch

    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    My dad says physics is super important because it underlines our fundamental understanding of the universe, so he was quite mad at me when I got a B for our Physics mock, but so far A level physics seems rather dull to me and has done little to enhance my understanding. All the difficulties in A level physics tests don't seem to have much to do with actual physics but instead just examiners trying to trip you up by sneakily adding a trap to every other question like changing the units and making the exam super time-pressured, so you don't have time to check or go through each question carefully. (I do OCR Specification B, and this is what Physics in Action feels like.)

    In a sense, this subject doesn't feel like a real subject. It definitely doesn't feel as 'real' as mathematics, for some reason, and I find it hard to see physics as a subject that can even rival mathematics in terms of the depth and beauty. The abstract thought that mathematics revolves around is far more elegant and permanent than physics.

    (This is almost as bad as A level economics, which I feel has almost no depth at all to the subject and shouldn't really be a subject: Economics is really just common sense with a few fancy words, definitions, and models that you have to remember.)

    I'm doing further maths, maths, physics and economics for a levels, with maths being my favorite subject. I'm starting to feel an increasingly strong dislike towards Physics the more I do it. My a level exam board doesn't seem to show ANY link between the two subjects, apart from a very basic key-stage-3 sort of level.

    One time, one of my dads friends heard I liked maths, so he recommended a book to me and said "if you like maths you'll like this book". It was called "The Universe". I flicked through it and it looked like maths, but after reading a few pages I quickly realized that it was more of a physics book than a maths book. I instantly put the book down in disgust, I felt almost as if I was cheated, as I was expecting a more meaningful experience.

    How do people who have tasted the remarkable beauty of maths even like this cancerous subject?
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    At A-level and GCSE, I agree with you. Physics is separated from maths because they can't assume A-level maths knowledge. Physics is also very basic at A-level. It's my easiest A-level subject (out of double maths and triple science). Self-studying, you can easily learn stuff way beyond the reaches of the syllabus.

    In real life though, physics is an awesome subject and is a great area of applied maths.


    Out of curiosity, do you have STEP as part of one of your offers?
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    I do maths at university and found physics boring and uninteresting in school so I done biology throughout school!!
    Offline

    8
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by CancerousProblem)
    X
    I've often thought what holds Physics back is that they have to make it so you can do A Level Physics without doing A Level Maths, which some people choose to do and to me is a very odd choice. If they could assume more maths confidence they'd be able to introduce you to more demanding concepts. Even so, I encourage you to see beyond the test paper and enjoy what you're actually being taught. I think there is interest to be had.

    In short I love Maths and Physics but Physics is where my heart lies and it's because it's not just a field of numbers and formulae. While it's nice to swim in those waters from time to time I am very much excited by seeing what we humans can do when we put Maths to work in the real world. We can mathematically describe how everything works! I can see how far a bullet will fly, I can predict how loud a sound will be at a certain distance from its source, I can work out how much force I need to place on a wire before it snaps. These things are all very useful and cool to me. AS Physics gives you a brief introduction to these aspects of physics in the small ways its maths restrictions allow it to.

    A2 physics might be better if you're not doing it yet. Generally includes gravity/space stuff, electric/magnetic fields, particle accelerators. Cool, useful physics like you hear about on TV, but not quite relativity yet!

    As for the paper itself, you can eliminate mistakes because of units and things by doing loads of past papers. It's the same tricks every time and you are smarter than the question . I don't really like that aspect of the course myself but most A Level exams are this way.
    • Wiki Support Team
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    Wiki Support Team
    Physics and economics - basically my fav subjects got slated in this post XD

    Calm yourself OP, this is nothing to rant about.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    I love Maths but I don't do Physics lol
    • Study Helper
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    Study Helper
    (Original post by RayApparently)
    Calm yourself OP, this is nothing to rant about.
    :five:

    I thought that this thread was going to be a good discussion...



    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Online

    20
    ReputationRep:
    Name:  whut.jpg
Views: 778
Size:  8.2 KB
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Because physics is largely based on maths.
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by CancerousProblem)
    My dad says physics is super important because it underlines our fundamental understanding of the universe, so he was quite mad at me when I got a B for our Physics mock, but so far A level physics seems rather dull to me and has done little to enhance my understanding. All the difficulties in A level physics tests don't seem to have much to do with actual physics but instead just examiners trying to trip you up by sneakily adding a trap to every other question like changing the units and making the exam super time-pressured, so you don't have time to check or go through each question carefully. (I do OCR Specification B, and this is what Physics in Action feels like.)

    In a sense, this subject doesn't feel like a real subject. It definitely doesn't feel as 'real' as mathematics, for some reason, and I find it hard to see physics as a subject that can even rival mathematics in terms of the depth and beauty. The abstract thought that mathematics revolves around is far more elegant and permanent than physics.

    (This is almost as bad as A level economics, which I feel has almost no depth at all to the subject and shouldn't really be a subject: Economics is really just common sense with a few fancy words, definitions, and models that you have to remember.)

    I'm doing further maths, maths, physics and economics for a levels, with maths being my favorite subject. I'm starting to feel an increasingly strong dislike towards Physics the more I do it. My a level exam board doesn't seem to show ANY link between the two subjects, apart from a very basic key-stage-3 sort of level.

    One time, one of my dads friends heard I liked maths, so he recommended a book to me and said "if you like maths you'll like this book". It was called "The Universe". I flicked through it and it looked like maths, but after reading a few pages I quickly realized that it was more of a physics book than a maths book. I instantly put the book down in disgust, I felt almost as if I was cheated, as I was expecting a more meaningful experience.

    How do people who have tasted the remarkable beauty of maths even like this cancerous subject?
    I did Maths, Further, Econ and Geog at A-Level so 3/4 the same as you. I always hated Physics and the mechanics modules. I'm now doing a Maths degree and I still hate Mechanics haha.
    • Wiki Support Team
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    Wiki Support Team
    (Original post by karmacrunch)
    :five:

    I thought that this thread was going to be a good discussion...
    Ikr - this girl won the thread:

    (Original post by Username unknown)
    Because physics is largely based on maths.
    :yy:
    Offline

    18
    ReputationRep:
    I study formal logic, philosophy of maths and philosophy of science.

    I hate physics. I'm just **** at applied maths hahaha >_>
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    Physics is maths.
    • Community Assistant
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    Community Assistant
    (Original post by CancerousProblem)
    My dad says physics is super important because it underlines our fundamental understanding of the universe, so he was quite mad at me when I got a B for our Physics mock, but so far A level physics seems rather dull to me and has done little to enhance my understanding. All the difficulties in A level physics tests don't seem to have much to do with actual physics but instead just examiners trying to trip you up by sneakily adding a trap to every other question like changing the units and making the exam super time-pressured, so you don't have time to check or go through each question carefully. (I do OCR Specification B, and this is what Physics in Action feels like.)

    In a sense, this subject doesn't feel like a real subject. It definitely doesn't feel as 'real' as mathematics, for some reason, and I find it hard to see physics as a subject that can even rival mathematics in terms of the depth and beauty. The abstract thought that mathematics revolves around is far more elegant and permanent than physics.

    (This is almost as bad as A level economics, which I feel has almost no depth at all to the subject and shouldn't really be a subject: Economics is really just common sense with a few fancy words, definitions, and models that you have to remember.)

    I'm doing further maths, maths, physics and economics for a levels, with maths being my favorite subject. I'm starting to feel an increasingly strong dislike towards Physics the more I do it. My a level exam board doesn't seem to show ANY link between the two subjects, apart from a very basic key-stage-3 sort of level.

    One time, one of my dads friends heard I liked maths, so he recommended a book to me and said "if you like maths you'll like this book". It was called "The Universe". I flicked through it and it looked like maths, but after reading a few pages I quickly realized that it was more of a physics book than a maths book. I instantly put the book down in disgust, I felt almost as if I was cheated, as I was expecting a more meaningful experience.

    How do people who have tasted the remarkable beauty of maths even like this cancerous subject?
    You know that everything you do in further maths at A-level is applied? Even the 'further pure' units... You'll find this out if you do physics at degree level. Abstract geometry, hard linear algebra and advanced probability theory will be most of your course. Chaos and non-linear dynamics are fun. The big difference is do you want to study maths for the sake of it or do you want to study literally the same maths to try to uncover the beauty of the universe?
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by morgan8002)
    At A-level and GCSE, I agree with you. Physics is separated from maths because they can't assume A-level maths knowledge. Physics is also very basic at A-level. It's my easiest A-level subject (out of double maths and triple science). Self-studying, you can easily learn stuff way beyond the reaches of the syllabus.

    In real life though, physics is an awesome subject and is a great area of applied maths.


    Out of curiosity, do you have STEP as part of one of your offers?
    I'm in the lower 6, not upper 6, so I haven't applied to any Uni's yet. Though I expect some will ask me to take step when I do apply next year.
    • Study Helper
    Online

    21
    ReputationRep:
    Study Helper
    (Original post by CancerousProblem)
    .........but so far A level physics seems rather dull to me and has done little to enhance my understanding.

    In a sense, this subject doesn't feel like a real subject. It definitely doesn't feel as 'real' as mathematics, for some reason, and I find it hard to see physics as a subject that can even rival mathematics in terms of the depth and beauty. The abstract thought that mathematics revolves around is far more elegant and permanent than physics.


    The A-level syllabus attempts to minimise the overlap between subjects for new knowledge between mathematics, physics and chemistry for good reason: to avoid covering the same ground in lessons and avoidance of duplicating content in examinations.

    Before one achieves enough competency in a language to read and fully comprehend Shakespeare, Tolstoy, Flaubert or Proust, one must first learn the alphabet, grammar and punctuation and have acquired a modicum of experience to place them within context.

    The education system must cater for a wide range of ability and motivation. In the apt paraphrased words of the English poet John Lydgate (circa 1420), “You can please some of the people all of the time, you can please all of the people some of the time, but you can’t please all of the people all of the time”.

    Many STEM students miss out on some gems of knowledge and wisdom.
    • Community Assistant
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    Community Assistant
    (Original post by CancerousProblem)
    (...)
    How do people who have tasted the remarkable beauty of maths even like this cancerous subject?
    Physics as a cancerous subject? I don't think so. On the contrary, it fascinates me, even if there are some experiments and lessons which have hardly to do with our every day life. The light experiment at a double slit or the photoelectric effect to name but a few seem to be unnecessary in the views of people who are looking for a purpose alone. This is completely different for myself, as I have a passion for that. When I have studied these topics for the first time, I was astonished about the results (interference at a double slit and the particle character of a light). That's why I guess it has so much to do with the own attitude.

    By the way I am fascinate/interest in mathematics as well!
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Kallisto)
    Physics as a cancerous subject? I don't think so. On the contrary, it fascinates me, even if there are some experiments and lessons which have hardly to do with our every day life. The light experiment at a double slit or the photoelectric effect to name but a few seem to be unnecessary in the views of people who are looking for a purpose alone. This is completely different for myself, as I have a passion for that. When I have studied these topics for the first time, I was astonished about the results (interference at a double slit and the particle character of a light). That's why I guess it has so much to do with the own attitude.

    By the way I am fascinate/interest in mathematics as well!
    Loads of pure mathematicians don't really like physicists though.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    • Study Helper
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    Study Helper
    They're similar subjects, but I think their relationship is a bit different. Mathematics is incredibly important to Physicists since Physics is basically applied Mathematics. Physics is less important to Mathematicians though since Mathematics is a lot 'purer' than Physics. So I think the relationship between the two subjects is a bit one-sided!
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    Because they are both sciences and similar in the maths elevent
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
Turn on thread page Beta
Updated: February 2, 2015
Poll
Do I go to The Streets tomorrow night?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.