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    Hey guys. I'm currently an apprentice at a local secondary school as an IT Technician.

    Whilst I've been doing this apprenticeship, I've realised that I'm very interested in network engineering and that it's definitely a field I'd like to go in to. I've looked online and not really found any clear instructions relating to this field. I've only been shown a few things which are server-related, such as DNS, active directory, group policies, DHCP, Hyper-V, and others - but I've had to research and play about with them myself.

    I've seen a few things about getting certified as a Microsoft professional, but haven't really found any clear explanation on what that entails or how I go about applying for that. Is it a course? Or just an exam? I'm not sure.

    As far as switches go, I've only really covered patching switch ports in and putting cat-5/6 cables in ports, not really anything to do with the configuration or creating VLANs or anything like that. So again I'm stuck!

    I've done Computer Science at A-level, so I understand TCP/IP a little bit, and packet layers and ports/ip addresses/subnets/gateways etc, but not really anything about unicasting/multicasting and the likes. Programming isn't an issue, but it's not really needed as far as I can tell, other than the occasional script or two.

    If someone could help give me a "step-by-step" set of instructions to getting into Network engineering with what I'll need to research/know, that would be super!

    A list of qualifications that I should look in to getting would great too.

    Cheers in advance!
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    Here are a few website that explain getting into network engineering below.

    https://nationalcareersservice.direc...kengineer.aspx
    http://www.prospects.ac.uk/network_e...escription.htm

    I personally stick with apprenticeship for now, after that if you get offered full time employment then stick with it for the experience. I cannot stress how important experience, especially for you. IT technician is great way to get into networking. I am not the best person to advise on getting into this role, but give you my opinion. Maybe apply for junior role in this area after you gain some more experience from your current role then your employer could sponsor you to take network related qualifications such as Cisco CCNA. You on a good start though keep it up.
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    (Original post by Vibenation)
    Here are a few website that explain getting into network engineering below.

    https://nationalcareersservice.direc...kengineer.aspx
    http://www.prospects.ac.uk/network_e...escription.htm

    I personally stick with apprenticeship for now, after that if you get offered full time employment then stick with it for the experience. I cannot stress how important experience, especially for you. IT technician is great way to get into networking. I am not the best person to advise on getting into this role, but give you my opinion. Maybe apply for junior role in this area after you gain some more experience from your current role then your employer could sponsor you to take network related qualifications such as Cisco CCNA. You on a good start though keep it up.
    Playing with Hyper-V and DHCP and other services like MMC (IIS) is administration.. If that's the route you want.. Stick with MS.. Just be warned that they're not the best to do exams.. For MCP you pass ANY MCSA exam.. Well.. Basically any excluding MTA and MOS(I think)

    Then there's Cisco and Junipher which is all the engineering side of networking..

    Personally I'd recommend..

    1) Finish the apprenticeship and get yourself a CCENT and MTA while doing so.. They probably won't sponsor you without any professional qualifications.. It gives them a sense of assurance..

    2) This should be done alongside your apprenticeship/job - Develop your skills in the necessary areas of MS and Cisco... You can do everything virtually (No Hyper-V) or you can do everything physical.. Buy yourself a few routers and switches.. - For MS do it all virtually.. Unless you have a Professional/Enterprise edition of Windows.

    Professional qualifications.. MTA > CCENT > CCNA > VCA-NV > MCSA: Windows Server or Windows 7/8 to begin with..

    Just look at some jobs and see what they're looking for and match your skills to that
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    Thank you both, I'll look at getting MTA certified first then. Sorry for the novice questions, but how does the microsoft cerification actually work? Is it an online course which I take that ends in an online exam? Or is it a physical paper exam that I arrange and go in for when I feel like I'm ready?

    If so, is there any training material which you can recommend?
    Cheers.
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    (Original post by BetaJedi)
    Thank you both, I'll look at getting MTA certified first then. Sorry for the novice questions, but how does the microsoft cerification actually work? Is it an online course which I take that ends in an online exam? Or is it a physical paper exam that I arrange and go in for when I feel like I'm ready?

    If so, is there any training material which you can recommend?
    Cheers.
    No problem.. It is taken at a Pearson certified testing place.. You take the exam on a computer in a heavily controlled environment.. No paper based.. After the exam.. When you leave you're given your grading scores since it is done automatically!

    It just depends on what MTA you want to approach (Assuming networking).. Having thought about it.. Given you're doing an apprenticeship it'd be a very pointless idea wasting £60-£99 on an MTA when you have experience.. Take a look into the CCENT.. Process is very similar.. See the link below
    100-101
    Topics

    If you have any other questions just ask.. and if you need help with any of the content just ask!!

    Ohh and here's the book I recommend for CCENT
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    (Original post by Binary Freak)
    No problem.. It is taken at a Pearson certified testing place.. You take the exam on a computer in a heavily controlled environment.. No paper based.. After the exam.. When you leave you're given your grading scores since it is done automatically!

    It just depends on what MTA you want to approach (Assuming networking).. Having thought about it.. Given you're doing an apprenticeship it'd be a very pointless idea wasting £60-£99 on an MTA when you have experience.. Take a look into the CCENT.. Process is very similar.. See the link below
    100-101
    Topics

    If you have any other questions just ask.. and if you need help with any of the content just ask!!

    Ohh and here's the book I recommend for CCENT
    Thanks a lot, I'll take a look into it! I'll be back if I have any more questions
 
 
 
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