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Is this greed or simply reasonable? - Salary negotiation Watch

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    I started working 2 years ago and I'd always thought I made a decent enough salary.

    However, I accidentally found out that I made 20% - 60% less than the people that have the exact same level as I am (I found this out when the Finance person accidentally sent me an email of all the employees' salaries - big fiasco!). But, coming back to these employees, I must insist that these people have either the same or probably less experience than I have, but were either lucky or smart enough to be able to negotiate that amount they are getting now. I was asking lesser 2 years back (I was basically referring to a different pay scale I supposed).

    Now, what I do find troubling is that I actually just gotten a salary increased on my 2nd year but that salary increased is where I made the 20% - 60% calculation; this basically means I made significantly lesser last year, which is 70% lesser!

    When I looked at these people's salary, I was significantly underpaid but with the same or more amount of work. I must include that my prior work was praised and I've been complimented by my reporting lead for my process improvement implementation in the company.

    I'm thinking to go to the manager and asked about this salary gap but do you think this is just greed talking or just being fair? If I did bring this up, the finance person may be in some trouble as well. It may also cause some uneasiness between the manager and me.

    I asked because I'm reasonably happy with the company and the job. The administrators are reasonable people (I think so). It's just this salary gap is bothering me loads. I told myself, perhaps I just need to take it, be happy and do the job.
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    Well it's perfectly reasonable to want to be paid the same as other people who are

    Whether or not following through on that by speaking to the manager is a good idea depends on how badly you want the money; how much you enjoy the job; how hard it would be to get that money/another job that is equally enjoyable elsewhere; how likely the manager is to give you the rise/how likely you are to face repercussions otherwise for even bringing it up.
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    (Original post by TorpidPhil)
    Well it's perfectly reasonable to want to be paid the same as other people who are

    Whether or not following through on that by speaking to the manager is a good idea depends on how badly you want the money; how much you enjoy the job; how hard it would be to get that money/another job that is equally enjoyable elsewhere; how likely the manager is to give you the rise/how likely you are to face repercussions otherwise for even bringing it up.
    I think it's more to do with the concern that I was basically being paid less than the other employees but my workload was and has been the same or more.

    I do enjoy the job.

    I'm not too sure. I did get 3 simultaneous calls from different companies last Friday; whether I'd enjoy working for them (or getting a job with them) is just another flip of a coin really.

    That's why I made this post; I'm unsure if this is greed talking or reasonable of me to be asking.
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    (Original post by kka25)
    I think it's more to do with the concern that I was basically being paid less than the other employees but my workload was and has been the same or more.

    I do enjoy the job.

    I'm not too sure. I did get 3 simultaneous calls from different companies last Friday; whether I'd enjoy working for them (or getting a job with them) is just another flip of a coin really.

    That's why I made this post; I'm unsure if this is greed talking or reasonable of me to be asking.
    Sorry I didn't even finish the first part of my last post before I posted it. Damn, I should get to bed...

    I meant to say it is perfectly reasonable to want to paid the same as others who are doing the same work at no better of a level.
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    Do you have a 1-2-1 with a manager/supervisor? If not, approach your HR Contact?

    I would show them and ask them to explain why you're getting paid less. Don't make a big fuss, but do emphasize you're disappointed and feel as though your loyalty hasn't been acknowledged. Ask what needs to happen to get a pay rise. (i.e do i need to work harder/better/ more hours etc)

    Whatever you do, don't let your colleagues know, don't demand anything, be humble and be prepared to defend your performance should you need to .
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    (Original post by Izzyeviel)
    Do you have a 1-2-1 with a manager/supervisor? If not, approach your HR Contact?

    I would show them and ask them to explain why you're getting paid less. Don't make a big fuss, but do emphasize you're disappointed and feel as though your loyalty hasn't been acknowledged. Ask what needs to happen to get a pay rise. (i.e do i need to work harder/better/ more hours etc)

    Whatever you do, don't let your colleagues know, don't demand anything, be humble and be prepared to defend your performance should you need to .
    Yes, I definitely do with my manager.

    I learned that making a huge deal about anything in the corporate world won't make things any better. But I do hope I'll remain calm but firm when approaching the manager if I concluded that my action on this matter is reasonable and not of greed. I need to show my disappointments as you pointed out. However I have read somewhere that managers don't like it when the employee starts comparing X, Y and Z salaries.

    Evidently, I'm basically implying that I want the same salary as some of these people; wouldn't that mean I'm indirectly asking (or put it more straightforwardly, demanding) something?
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    Does everyone already know about the finance guy screw up?


    Either way, tell your manager that you know the others earn more and don't think it's fair and you feel underappreciated by doing the same work for less.

    They may tell you to go away but they may not.

    If you also tell them about the other job offers for you on the table offering more salary as well but reinforce that you want to stay but at a fair salary.

    I don't reckon they'll put you to the same wage but there's a good chance they'll move you closer at least. Unless there are good reasons for the salary difference.
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    (Original post by Izzyeviel)
    Do you have a 1-2-1 with a manager/supervisor? If not, approach your HR Contact?

    I would show them and ask them to explain why you're getting paid less. Don't make a big fuss, but do emphasize you're disappointed and feel as though your loyalty hasn't been acknowledged. Ask what needs to happen to get a pay rise. (i.e do i need to work harder/better/ more hours etc)

    Whatever you do, don't let your colleagues know, don't demand anything, be humble and be prepared to defend your performance should you need to .

    Definitely this. Emphasise that you want to do what you need to in order to get a pay rise and that you're definitely saddened rather than angry about this.


    God I hate pay negotiations.
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    (Original post by Motorbiker)
    Does everyone already know about the finance guy screw up?


    Either way, tell your manager that you know the others earn more and don't think it's fair and you feel underappreciated by doing the same work for less.

    They may tell you to go away but they may not.

    If you also tell them about the other job offers for you on the table offering more salary as well but reinforce that you want to stay but at a fair salary.

    I don't reckon they'll put you to the same wage but there's a good chance they'll move you closer at least. Unless there are good reasons for the salary difference.
    Not at this scale no, but this person is known to screw-up payslips; there were incidences where payslips were sent to the wrong employees.

    I went out for a walk just now to get my head clear and I really had some mixed feelings about this whole scenario. At one point, I do feel that I was basically being used, but at another point, I've already gotten a pay increased prior which I thought was good enough for me; but that all changed of course when I discovered how much I was getting compared to others.

    I don't think I'd be telling about the other job offers; I don't really think I want to leave just yet; it's just the this recent discovery made me feel a bit off with my current scenario at the office.
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    (Original post by kka25)
    Not at this scale no, but this person is known to screw-up payslips; there were incidences where payslips were sent to the wrong employees.

    I went out for a walk just now to get my head clear and I really had some mixed feelings about this whole scenario. At one point, I do feel that I was basically being used, but at another point, I've already gotten a pay increased prior which I thought was good enough for me; but that all changed of course when I discovered how much I was getting compared to others.

    I don't think I'd be telling about the other job offers; I don't really think I want to leave just yet; it's just the this recent discovery made me feel a bit off with my current scenario at the office.
    I wouldn't mention other job offers at this stage as it will just seem like you're angry and threatening your manager... you know your manager and are therefore best placed to decide whether asking about this is likely to cause them to treat you badly, but I would just sit down and explain what you have said here, that you are really happy working here and felt you had been doing well due to the praise you've received and now find out you're being paid less and are therefore disappointed and worried that there is something wrong with your performance as obviously you do all the same tasks as others... if your manager acknowledges that your performance is equal it will be harder for them to justify why you are being paid less
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    Salary negotiations should always be based around your own personal value.. not on what others are earning. It's easier to justify someone asking for a pay rise because they bring increased value to the company.. not as easy because they are simply annoyed that they earn less than others.

    Alot of places have (perhaps unenforceable) rules against discussing pay levels between staff to stop this exact type of thing. Instead of saying that you think you're underpaid compared to others at the firm.. perhaps say that youve been contacted by recruiters who have said the sort of market rate is more like X amount and so you feel you might be missing an opportunity. however emphasise that you really do want to stay at your current company.

    Pay negotiations are always tricky. I've only ever gone into them when I already had another job offer or was prepared to leave anyway. The first time they matched my other offer.. and the 2nd time I left after a couple of months. There's no point going into the negotiation if you're not going to do anything if/when they say no.
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    (Original post by doodle_333)
    I wouldn't mention other job offers at this stage as it will just seem like you're angry and threatening your manager...
    I disagree. Perhaps not say outright that you have other offers but say that you've noticed other job adverts on Linkedin etc and they offer more for the same role.
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    (Original post by Reue)
    I disagree. Perhaps not say outright that you have other offers but say that you've noticed other job adverts on Linkedin etc and they offer more for the same role.
    This is a good suggestion; the only problem that I may face is that the manager will argue that I've already received a pay increased prior so there's no need to increase my salary.
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    (Original post by kka25)
    This is a good suggestion; the only problem that I may face is that the manager will argue that I've already received a pay increase prior so there's no need to increase my salary.
    And, harsh as it sounds; I would be inclined to agree with him.

    If you hadn't have found out about the pay difference then you would be perfectly happy with your current salary I'm guessing?
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    (Original post by Reue)
    If you hadn't have found out about the pay difference then you would be perfectly happy with your current salary I'm guessing?
    Exactly

    The height of the irony here is that when the manager gave me the increased, he reacted as if it's a 'large sum'.
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    To make it a bit clear:

    Let's say I'm Max; the below is a heavily modified version of the slip (for the obvious reasons); the year is the number of working experience:

    Carl £1800 0 year
    Max £2000 3 year
    Oliver £4000 3 year
    Conner £5000 3 year
    James £2300 2.5 year
    Kent £2500 1 year

    Kent who is younger and has lesser experience than me is making more, whilst Conner who has the exact same experience is making more than me. Strange enough, James is also making lesser than Kent but having more experience than him. Carl, who has 0 worth of experience, is almost making the same amount as me!
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    (Original post by kka25)
    Carl £1800 0 year
    Max £2000 3 year
    Oliver £4000 3 year
    Conner £5000 3 year
    James £2300 2.5 year
    Kent £2500 1 year
    Wow, Conner is rolling in it
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    (Original post by Reue)
    Wow, Conner is rolling in it
    I know right? :confused:
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    Basically get another job, tell the people that you have a better job, say you're planning on leaving because you don't get paid/valued enough. Use that bluff and the manager will pay you more. If not you have another job that you're getting paid more.
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    (Original post by jam277)
    Basically get another job, tell the people that you have a better job, say you're planning on leaving because you don't get paid/valued enough. Use that bluff and the manager will pay you more. If not you have another job that you're getting paid more.
    This is very risky. Someone just left the company and the manager didn't even bother offering more (and he would have stayed if more money were given)
 
 
 
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