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    It's true that languages don't limit your career options, but it neither does point you in much of a direction. Apart from the obvious teaching and translation, if you haven't got something in particular you'd like to do afterwards you might end up being faced with a seemingly useless degree.

    Would it be better to pair them with another degree such as Law? Or self-teach and immerse yourself in the native country?

    If they are useful, realistically: what universities put you in good stead and, what and how many languages do you need to be 'fluent' in? (the latter questions are a bit subjective, I know)

    PS. I'm keen on learning languages, but just worried that it just isn't a secure career pathway.

    Any thoughts?
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    (Original post by acven)
    It's true that languages don't limit your career options, but it neither does point you in much of a direction. Apart from the obvious teaching and translation, if you haven't got something in particular you'd like to do afterwards you might end up being faced with a seemingly useless degree.

    Would it be better to pair them with another degree such as Law? Or self-teach and immerse yourself in the native country?

    If they are useful, realistically: what universities put you in good stead and, what and how many languages do you need to be 'fluent' in? (the latter questions are a bit subjective, I know)

    PS. I'm keen on learning languages, but just worried that it just isn't a secure career pathway.

    Any thoughts?
    I'm starting a BA Modern Languages Degree this year at the University of Birmingham. Obviously if you want to be a teacher/translator of languages it's the degree you need to do. However languages degrees for me look like one of the best degrees to have as you actually leave with a skill in comparison to perhaps degrees such as English Lit. It does open up a lot of doors. Don't forgot you could do a degree in MFL and do a law conversion course, a different subject for your masters etc. either way you still have the skill of speaking a foreign languages.

    There's a lot of controversy about three language degrees as they focus on just pure language rather than an cultural aspects as well which you need to know. I chose Birmingham because it allowed me to carry on my post A level language, start a new language and minor in translation studies.


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    (Original post by acven)
    It's true that languages don't limit your career options, but it neither does point you in much of a direction. Apart from the obvious teaching and translation, if you haven't got something in particular you'd like to do afterwards you might end up being faced with a seemingly useless degree.

    Would it be better to pair them with another degree such as Law? Or self-teach and immerse yourself in the native country?

    If they are useful, realistically: what universities put you in good stead and, what and how many languages do you need to be 'fluent' in? (the latter questions are a bit subjective, I know)

    PS. I'm keen on learning languages, but just worried that it just isn't a secure career pathway.

    Any thoughts?
    Hi,

    I think pairing languages with a vocational minor subject is a very sensible idea.

    Many years ago, I graduated from university with a nice shiny traditional mostly literature-based degree in languages and no idea what I wanted to do other than not teach. By accident, more than by design, I ended up working in tourism and settling in a country where neither of my languages was spoken! I now work with that country's language as a translator.

    Languages can be paired with so many other subjects from business and economics to tourism and sport, as well as the more obvious choices of teaching and translating.

    Not only that, there is a huge need for well-qualified linguists. Take a look at this article on the subject by the British Council:
    http://www.britishcouncil.org/organi...-uk-needs-most
    There is a link in the article to the report they mention, which goes into great detail.

    I agree with Leanne that you're probably best to stick with two languages at most, since that gives you leeway to add in the vocational minor subject. However, if you're keen on the cultural/historical/literary aspects too, there's no reason why you can't focus on just one language and that would let you incorporate those into your degree too.

    Hope this helps. Good luck with your choices.
 
 
 
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