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Social point of chip and pin bank cards REP REWARD watch

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    But if there isn't a "standard" machine, how can you trust it?
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    Another implication

    People could cause chaos simply by visiting a large retail outlet and cutting all of the cords.

    The credit card system went down at my local sainsbury's - the were closed for an entire saturday morning getting it back up...imagine if fixing it involved calling in someone to rewire all of these key pads....
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    (Original post by Fluffy)
    Ohh! It will save all of 5 cm of paper

    I don't think chip and pin will last too long, not with other technologies such as The Pay By Touch system on the horizon....
    When I worked in boots I served 350 customers one day, and I would guess abotu 2/3 of those used a card. That's a lot of paper! So shh, I was being partly sarcastic anyway
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    (Original post by ruthiepoothie)
    social implications are that the type of crime will probably change. Instead of credit card fraud in shops, criminals are more likely to use the internet with the stolen card- as the pin number will not be needed here.
    Also as corporate secrity is getting tighter petty criminals eg drug addicts are probably going to target more homes to obtain their 'booty' and drug money
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    actually i've thought of a way for chip n pin cards to be used, which may/may not cause more fraud.

    mother wants to buy a crate of wine. mother cannot go to supermarket since she's got to cook for the party. mother asks son to take her new chip n pin card and go buy a crate of wine (son is dirt poor, so he can't spend his own money). son goes and gets crate of wine, entering pin number. dilemma resolved without mother leaving the cooking. result: successful party.

    so it will allow people to purchase items using someone else's card (with their approval of course).

    although there would be the issue of children abusing their parent's cards if they found out the PIN number...
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    I was going for the disability thing myself. My signature varies a lot depending on how much grip I have and how much pain i'm in. I've been asked to resign SO many times, so for me a pin is a better idea.

    Blind people, well the numbers on a key pad and on a telephone are in the same sequence so shouldn't be too bad and possibly easier than carrying one of those templates the bank issue.

    Ok another social implication - you will now HAVE to have a pin for a credit card, which makes it very easy to take out cash and run up a bill. I can't remember what you pay extra on cash rather than goods but it makes a difference.

    Elderly people, I was in a post office queue the other day and the elderly at the front of the queue recited her pin in a loud voice as she keyed it in. It appeared to be her first time using a card and pin. Issues with technology going faster than people can cope with.

    How many pins does someone need? If you have a switch card and a couple of credit cards do you have different pins or do you change them all to the same one? This could have implications if a card is stolen.

    Allowing someone to borrow your card. I know the rules say you shouldn't but I've allowed a friend to take cash out with my cashpoint card. Will couples allower their partner to use their card for the weekly shop? Or will parents allow children to use their cards?

    Will it cost the supermarket less because people are not walking off with ball point pens all the time?
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    (Original post by 4Ed)
    actually i've thought of a way for chip n pin cards to be used, which may/may not cause more fraud.

    mother wants to buy a crate of wine. mother cannot go to supermarket since she's got to cook for the party. mother asks son to take her new chip n pin card and go buy a crate of wine (son is dirt poor, so he can't spend his own money). son goes and gets crate of wine, entering pin number. dilemma resolved without mother leaving the cooking. result: successful party.

    so it will allow people to purchase items using someone else's card (with their approval of course).

    although there would be the issue of children abusing their parent's cards if they found out the PIN number...
    I do hope he's over 18
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    Also, I have had to have my PIN number changed once and it took a few days for it to work in a cash point, but I was fine in a shop because I just signed. Not being able to use a card for a few days could be a slight problem!
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    (Original post by sashh)
    Will it cost the supermarket less because people are not walking off with ball point pens all the time?
    Excellent point
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    (Original post by Fluffy)
    I do hope he's over 18
    hypothetically speaking, he's over 18, but with a giant student overdraft, so he can't afford to purchase wine for his mother
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    Can't all this thing about cord length etc be solved in today's modern, technologically advanced society by using wireless systems?
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    (Original post by teamvillage)
    Can't all this thing about cord length etc be solved in today's modern, technologically advanced society by using wireless systems?

    There is no way in hell I would send my personal financial details through a wireless network - you're just asking for trouble! Wireless signals are so easy to intercept!
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    (Original post by teamvillage)
    Can't all this thing about cord length etc be solved in today's modern, technologically advanced society by using wireless systems?
    a wireless keypad can be nicked. and you'd have to have a whole range of different frequencies available, which could potentially interfere with each other.

    there's also a problem about encryption, and signals getting intercepted...
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    (Original post by 4Ed)
    a wireless keypad can be nicked.
    And that relates back to my query about them all being/looking different. How do you knoe which is a "real" one if there is no standard look? You could have some dodgy people getting hold of your card and pin numbers.
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    (Original post by blissy)
    And that relates back to my query about them all being/looking different. How do you knoe which is a "real" one if there is no standard look? You could have some dodgy people getting hold of your card and pin numbers.
    You mean with a fake keypad that records card/pin details for whoever its belongs to?
    A little while back a couple of guys built a fake cash machine in an unused store front they had that swiped people's cards, and let them enter their pin numbers, but then showed the message 'Out of Order' or 'Out of cash', or something. They then cloned the cards by recording the details onto blank cards, and used them in real cash machines.
    They only used to take out about £20 at a time, and were caught only when they started getting greedy and taking noticeable amounts.

    Do you think it would be easier or harder to pull the same trick with false keypads than cash machines? You wouldn't have to have a free high street store, but I think the people designing the system would be far more aware of the possibilities of this sort of fraud. Hopefully.
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    (Original post by ruthiepoothie)
    social implications are that the type of crime will probably change. Instead of credit card fraud in shops, criminals are more likely to use the internet with the stolen card- as the pin number will not be needed here.
    Indeed; there could also be an increase of muggings outside (relatively so) when people listen in, or see users typing their PIN, but this isn't really that significant, I would imagine.

    (Original post by Pencil Queen)
    Not to mention people with arthritis who with signature cards could simply carry their own ergonomic pen.

    And of course someone typing in their pin from sat in a wheelchair is going to be very easy to watch what their number is...and pretty easy to swipe their card at a later date.

    It's hard enough getting retailers to provide something to lean on while signing a credit card slip when you can't get to the counter...I wouldn't be surprised to find that retailers wont provide long enough cords for pins to be entered from a distance (long cables are probably a health and safety hazard).
    You can request a chip & signature card instead of chip & PIN for if you have a disability that means signature would be easier for you, and they will still have to accept these.

    i agree they could have done quite a bit more to make chip&pin more accessible though.

    rosie
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    From what I've heard from customers at work, it divides the young and old. The young people are all for it, it's quick and more efficient than signing, but the older generation don't trust it and prefer to sign. Maybe reflecting the generation gap in society, where the older ones fear change etc etc
 
 
 
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