Why are there so many recruitment companies? Watch

TheInformer
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I've recently re-joined the great unwashed and had forgotten what a 'mare it is to find a decent job.

One of the main gripes is recruitment companies. They may be beneficial to the hiring company but they seem detrimental to the jobseekers efforts:

- You see a job posting that you like the sound of, you meet all/most required criteria.
- You apply with a decent CV, a wealth of relevant experience, a beautiful, majestic covering letter.
-You play the waiting game.
- A week later your phone rings, your heart skips a beat, you answer in your cheeriest most enthusiastic voice. It's the recruitment company.
-You speak to a very chatty person who talks to you about the job and your experience. They invite you to their office.
- Their office is 20 miles away but you don't care - you've got yourself that dream job... right?.
- You arrive at 9AM in your best suit, fill out some forms, leave 5 minutes later and never hear from them again.

What a waste of time/effort.

Someone, somewhere once said "Eventually in this country (UK) everyone will just be selling each other insurance". I think a more accurate version is: "Eventually in this country everyone will just be a recruitment consultant, recruiting for recruitment consultant jobs".

Could someone enlighten me as to why pretty much 90% of advertised jobs are through recruitment companies?

I understand it may be difficult when looking for a new CEO or COO etc but surely if it's a min wage job, just interview the first 5 people who fit the bill and hire one of them. Saving your company money.

Yes wall of text.
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macromicro
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(Original post by TheInformer)
Could someone enlighten me as to why pretty much 90% of advertised jobs are through recruitment companies?
They're not, you're just looking in the wrong place. If you go on a website like Reed.co.uk, which is obviously owned by the Recruitment firm Reed, then it will be flooded with recruitment jobs and anything else will of course go through Reed consultants.

The way to get a job is to target a company you want to work for. If there are no vacancies on their website then ring up HR, inquire into volunteering, try and get a contact. Most companies who you want to work for have their own careers section on their website. I don't ever go on job boards, they are completely useless. Most people who say there aren't any jobs are just browsing job boards and doing the bare minimum. You need to be more entrepreneurial.
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TheInformer
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(Original post by macromicro)
They're not, you're just looking in the wrong place. If you go on a website like Reed.co.uk, which is obviously owned by the Recruitment firm Reed, then it will be flooded with recruitment jobs and anything else will of course go through Reed consultants.

The way to get a job is to target a company you want to work for. If there are no vacancies on their website then ring up HR, inquire into volunteering, try and get a contact. Most companies who you want to work for have their own careers section on their website. I don't ever go on job boards, they are completely useless. Most people who say there aren't any jobs are just browsing job boards and doing the bare minimum. You need to be more entrepreneurial.
Thanks for the feedback.

Where do employers advertise if not sites like Reed or Indeed? I've looked on one or two 'Employer only' jobs boards but there are only 10 jobs or so listed, 90% are completely out of my reach (E.G Accountant/Engineer/Wizard wanted - Min 5 years experience).

Looking directly at company websites sounds great in principal but that is done in a day. There simply aren't enough opportunities, I'm not picky in the slightest. The past 3 interviews I've had have all been from the times I've managed to apply directly to the company.

Volunteering isn't an option for me; I can't afford to work for free to gain experience... I've already got 7 years of work experience in a variety of fields in addition to a decent educational background. I shouldn't have to whore myself out at this stage.
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Nymthae
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Particularly with smaller companies, it's a waste of time for HR to be spending that time trying to find entry level/basic skilled workers. They tend to just prefer to pay someone else to deal with a lot of it, so the companies departments can continue doing the work they need to do.

I was sceptical about agencies for a while, but actually they're not that bad. I do wish I could contact some companies more directly, but I guess you need to deal with it as it is. Large corporations are more particular about their people, and have the resource to advertise their own jobs (and reputation to draw people in). It's just they can be difficult to crack into if you're not an experienced professional, or make it through 200 hoops to be one of the very few people they take on a graduate scheme.
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TheInformer
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(Original post by J-SP)
Because people don't have the time or network to do it themselves. So like most things, when you haven't got the time to do it, or expertise, you pay someone else do to it.
Maybe I'm being unrealistic but how hard is it really to fill a min' wage customer service job?

1) Stick a job ad up somewhere.
2) Wait for the CVs to roll in.
3) Skim read until you have 5 or so suitable candidates and then interview them.
4) Done.

Saving your company money as you don't need to pay any 3rd party.

Like I said, it's different if you're looking for a very senior position. It's as though they're looking for Superman to fill a shelf-stacking position.
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macromicro
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(Original post by TheInformer)
Where do employers advertise if not sites like Reed or Indeed?
Their website or, if they're very small, just in the shop window. Indeed is admittedly the best of a bad bunch, but I still find the success rate of emailing CVs too low to bother with.

(Original post by TheInformer)
Looking directly at company websites sounds great in principal but that is done in a day. There simply aren't enough opportunities, I'm not picky in the slightest. The past 3 interviews I've had have all been from the times I've managed to apply directly to the company.
There are lots of opportunities, especially if you're not picky. I can tell by your tone and attitude that you don't have a real hunger for a job. The people who get jobs are the people who go above and beyond. I currently have three different jobs - not once did I go on a job board and for one of them I volunteered for a month as a trial to prove I was good enough. It's very easy to sit around and complain there's nothing out there - it's a heck of a lot harder to prove your worth to a company and go get what you want.

(Original post by TheInformer)
Volunteering isn't an option for me; I can't afford to work for free to gain experience... I've already got 7 years of work experience in a variety of fields in addition to a decent educational background. I shouldn't have to whore myself out at this stage.
Employers don't care about your variety of work experience - they care about your experience which is directly related to their job vacancy. If you don't have enough, then volunteer. If you can afford to be unemployed while you job hunt then you can afford to volunteer while you job hunt.
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_icecream
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Recruitment agencies are the biggest scum
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maxi365
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Most of the answers on here say that the recruitment agencies are rubbish but think about the thousands of applications they have, and then think about whether it is likely that they would even read your application because they haven't found like 20 other people for the job.

They must be doing something right otherwise businesses wouldn't use them- simple as that.

I personally gave up on recruitment agencies and began cold calling small shops in the area, and got a part time job that way.


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aguptan
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(Original post by TheInformer)
I've recently re-joined the great unwashed and had forgotten what a 'mare it is to find a decent job.

One of the main gripes is recruitment companies. They may be beneficial to the hiring company but they seem detrimental to the jobseekers efforts:

- You see a job posting that you like the sound of, you meet all/most required criteria.
- You apply with a decent CV, a wealth of relevant experience, a beautiful, majestic covering letter.
-You play the waiting game.
- A week later your phone rings, your heart skips a beat, you answer in your cheeriest most enthusiastic voice. It's the recruitment company.
-You speak to a very chatty person who talks to you about the job and your experience. They invite you to their office.
- Their office is 20 miles away but you don't care - you've got yourself that dream job... right?.
- You arrive at 9AM in your best suit, fill out some forms, leave 5 minutes later and never hear from them again.

What a waste of time/effort.



Yes wall of text.
My experience of recruitment companies has been fairly positive (if you exclude the people that actually work there.....wouldn't trust them as far as you can throw them) in that they've always managed to find me something.
Top tips though are:
- Be really focused in your CV, generic CVs don't cut it, tailor it specifically to the exact job you're after
- You must go and see the recruitment agent face to face, turn up smart and immediately you will above 90% of the people that just send stuff in
- Hassle them....be ringing them every other day asking if they have stuff. They will find you a job to shut you up. If you wait for them you will wait forever
- Go for the bigger agencies. Just my experience but the bigger ones (Reed etc. ) had more stuff.
- Don't trust anything they say about ringing you back, keep chasing them

Good luck with it!
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Smack
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(Original post by J-SP)
Also, usually the best candidates are already in work and are currently hired by someone else. They might not be actively looking for a job. Recruitment agencies are designed to tap these people up and encourage them to consider roles.


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But what methods do recruitment agencies have at their disposal to poach employees from other organisations that a company's own recruitment staff does not have?

Ultimately most people who are in employment and happy enough in said employment that they are not actively seeking other opportunities themselves are only going to consider a move if they are offered a better package elsewhere. External recruitment agencies are not in a position to offer such a package; in fact the fees that the agency charges will in fact already make the potential new employee a lot more expensive without the enhanced package being offered to encourage such a move.
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Rakas21
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I can only speak for a friend but he was looking for some kind of office role and praises agencies. He said that what he did was go to 33 agencies (i think he was near London so i assume they were there), register with them all and then twice a week he'd call them up. Unless he was talking rubbish then after 3 weeks he had 7 interviews for permanent roles.
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Smack
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(Original post by J-SP)
Time, contacts, networks and a large recruitment database.

It's not always about getting the cheaper recruit it's about getting the bedt


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None of which organisations are precluded from having on their own, especially with the popularity of LinkedIn these days.
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Smack
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(Original post by J-SP)
You really don't understand the system then. Recruitment fluctuates heavily within an organisation. One month you could need hundreds of people - the next six months no one. Your own employees are not set for that fluctuation, so you are not equipped to do it.

Get a specialist to do it externally and it will be cheaper and more efficient.


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That might be the case for the lower end of the market but for higher level positions, where recruitment volumes are much lower and you typically need to poach someone from elsewhere, I'm not sure it is. I struggle to see the value in paying the fee to the recruitment agency rather than adding it to the package of the potential employee.

Organisations clearly are able to do this as I have been approached by organisations directly as well as from recruitment agencies.
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Smack
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(Original post by J-SP)
Some organisations do it and have their own internal recruitment teams.

Other people hire freelancers like me to come and deal with fluctuations in hiring.

But many organisations are not set up for it and never will be.

As someone said before, that's why there are so many agencies out there and why they are so successful.

Things like LinkedIn are changing the landscape somewhat but no where near to the level required to do what your suggesting.


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I think that organisations that eschew any sort of internal recruitment function and thus rely on external recruitment agencies are missing a trick when it comes to cost reduction. I can see why such agencies would be useful for providing temporary staff and in the lower end of the market where the volumes of CVs are large, but ultimately in-house staff should know much better the experiences and skills required to do a higher level role within an organisation than an external agent.
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member1179807
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(Original post by TheInformer)
I've recently re-joined the great unwashed and had forgotten what a 'mare it is to find a decent job.

One of the main gripes is recruitment companies. They may be beneficial to the hiring company but they seem detrimental to the jobseekers efforts:

- You see a job posting that you like the sound of, you meet all/most required criteria.
- You apply with a decent CV, a wealth of relevant experience, a beautiful, majestic covering letter.
-You play the waiting game.
- A week later your phone rings, your heart skips a beat, you answer in your cheeriest most enthusiastic voice. It's the recruitment company.
-You speak to a very chatty person who talks to you about the job and your experience. They invite you to their office.
- Their office is 20 miles away but you don't care - you've got yourself that dream job... right?.
- You arrive at 9AM in your best suit, fill out some forms, leave 5 minutes later and never hear from them again.

What a waste of time/effort.

Someone, somewhere once said "Eventually in this country (UK) everyone will just be selling each other insurance". I think a more accurate version is: "Eventually in this country everyone will just be a recruitment consultant, recruiting for recruitment consultant jobs".

Could someone enlighten me as to why pretty much 90% of advertised jobs are through recruitment companies?

I understand it may be difficult when looking for a new CEO or COO etc but surely if it's a min wage job, just interview the first 5 people who fit the bill and hire one of them. Saving your company money.

Yes wall of text.
It depends on that candidate. For very strong experienced candidates, the recruitment companies are chasing them.

It boils down to the fact that young people have a chick and egg situation to break through. There needs to be a strategy to break through it, but this is a one time thing.


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