Amie_dancer
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I am really unsure about what I want to do for my career- I know I want to go to uni and do a degree and that I want to be a teacher. However I am torn between teaching dance, pe and English. I was wondering if I could do a degree in English for example, them do a PGCE and be able to teach pe for example? Or do I have to do a degree in the subject I am planning on teaching? One last question: if I did an English degree but decided I wanted to teach pe would it be enough to have an AS in pe or do I need a full a level in pe to teach it?

Thank you
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Andrew657Thomas
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As your name is Amie_dancer I assume you enjoy dancing the most, I would choose that, which ever one you enjoy most.

As for the other questions I can't help, try asking Google!
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AdamCee
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(Original post by Amie_dancer)
I am really unsure about what I want to do for my career- I know I want to go to uni and do a degree and that I want to be a teacher. However I am torn between teaching dance, pe and English. I was wondering if I could do a degree in English for example, them do a PGCE and be able to teach pe for example? Or do I have to do a degree in the subject I am planning on teaching? One last question: if I did an English degree but decided I wanted to teach pe would it be enough to have an AS in pe or do I need a full a level in pe to teach it?

Thank you
I'm not entirely sure, but I think a lot of teachers do have a "secondary" subject. So yes if you have a degree in English you could still teach PE, although I'd imagine you wouldn't be able to teach A level.
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SpenceHarris1589
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(Original post by Amie_dancer)
I am really unsure about what I want to do for my career- I know I want to go to uni and do a degree and that I want to be a teacher. However I am torn between teaching dance, pe and English. I was wondering if I could do a degree in English for example, them do a PGCE and be able to teach pe for example? Or do I have to do a degree in the subject I am planning on teaching? One last question: if I did an English degree but decided I wanted to teach pe would it be enough to have an AS in pe or do I need a full a level in pe to teach it?

Thank you
Most universities will not accept you onto a PGCE course unless 50% minimum of your degree was in that field. So If you did a dance degree or something sport related, you'd be able to teach dance and PE I'd imagine, but I know you would not be allowed to teach English and vice versa, if you did an English degree, you wouldn't be allowed to teach PE or Dance. Dance and PE are often in the same bracket almost as they are both physical and require specific skill sets which are interchangeable. choose quickly.
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Amie_dancer
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(Original post by Andrew657Thomas)
As your name is Amie_dancer I assume you enjoy dancing the most, I would choose that, which ever one you enjoy most.

As for the other questions I can't help, try asking Google!
Yes I do enjoy dancing the most haha, thank you for your advice
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Amie_dancer
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(Original post by AdamCee)
I'm not entirely sure, but I think a lot of teachers do have a "secondary" subject. So yes if you have a degree in English you could still teach PE, although I'd imagine you wouldn't be able to teach A level.
Yeah I read online that I could teach a level below the qualification I have so I would be able to teach GCSE pe I'm not planning on teaching a level haha so that's good!
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Amie_dancer
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(Original post by SpenceHarris1589)
Most universities will not accept you onto a PGCE course unless 50% minimum of your degree was in that field. So If you did a dance degree or something sport related, you'd be able to teach dance and PE I'd imagine, but I know you would not be allowed to teach English and vice versa, if you did an English degree, you wouldn't be allowed to teach PE or Dance. Dance and PE are often in the same bracket almost as they are both physical and require specific skill sets which are interchangeable. choose quickly.
Oh I see! This is really helpful, thank you so much for replying! I have until September to decide what I want to do which is good but I wish I could either talk to someone who does each job or go on work experience :/ thank you again
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German123
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(Original post by Amie_dancer)
I am really unsure about what I want to do for my career- I know I want to go to uni and do a degree and that I want to be a teacher. However I am torn between teaching dance, pe and English. I was wondering if I could do a degree in English for example, them do a PGCE and be able to teach pe for example? Or do I have to do a degree in the subject I am planning on teaching? One last question: if I did an English degree but decided I wanted to teach pe would it be enough to have an AS in pe or do I need a full a level in pe to teach it?

Thank you
I am pretty sure you could do a combined course(English with PE) i know this because my ex PE teacher said that she did English lit and PE as a joint honours and did not do PE A level. Anyway you should check to be sure. Also i am not sure of what her A levels were apart from Psychology.
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Lolgarithms
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(Original post by Amie_dancer)
I am really unsure about what I want to do for my career- I know I want to go to uni and do a degree and that I want to be a teacher. However I am torn between teaching dance, pe and English. I was wondering if I could do a degree in English for example, them do a PGCE and be able to teach pe for example? Or do I have to do a degree in the subject I am planning on teaching? One last question: if I did an English degree but decided I wanted to teach pe would it be enough to have an AS in pe or do I need a full a level in pe to teach it?

Thank you
Once you pass a PGCE/other teacher training route and get Qualified Teacher Status, you can teach whatever your school thinks you are qualified for in terms of your subject knowledge. It's not uncommon for some teachers to teach two subjects - they won't have done a PGCE in each subject.

Secondary English and Secondary PE are both pretty competitive PGCE courses though, so when the time comes, you'll want to be making your application for one particular subject as strong as you can. You'd ideally need A-levels in both, and a degree in one or the other (or perhaps a combined English/PE degree if you can find somewhere that offers it).
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Amie_dancer
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(Original post by German123)
I am pretty sure you could do a combined course(English with PE) i know this because my ex PE teacher said that she did English lit and PE as a joint honours and did not do PE A level. Anyway you should check to be sure. Also i am not sure of what her A levels were apart from Psychology.
Ooh I shall look into this! I didn't think of this thank you
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Amie_dancer
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(Original post by TEACHINGJOBS)
Hi I'm Queens completing my masters but I've taught in England for a few years.
Did you know there is a recruitment event on Thursday at the Wellington Park from 11am - 8pm. One of my friends is an phenomenal teacher and I am sure she can help you.

I think their facebook page is 'Teach in Kent'

Maybe check it out?

C
Thank you, I'll definitely go and have a look!
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Amie_dancer
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(Original post by Lolgarithms)
Once you pass a PGCE/other teacher training route and get Qualified Teacher Status, you can teach whatever your school thinks you are qualified for in terms of your subject knowledge. It's not uncommon for some teachers to teach two subjects - they won't have done a PGCE in each subject.

Secondary English and Secondary PE are both pretty competitive PGCE courses though, so when the time comes, you'll want to be making your application for one particular subject as strong as you can. You'd ideally need A-levels in both, and a degree in one or the other (or perhaps a combined English/PE degree if you can find somewhere that offers it).
Ah okay, that's good to know. I see, that's really helpful to know thank you! I shall be looking at combined courses to see which options are available to me!
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German123
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(Original post by Amie_dancer)
Ooh I shall look into this! I didn't think of this thank you
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l'insegnante
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(Original post by Amie_dancer)
I am really unsure about what I want to do for my career- I know I want to go to uni and do a degree and that I want to be a teacher. However I am torn between teaching dance, pe and English. I was wondering if I could do a degree in English for example, them do a PGCE and be able to teach pe for example? Or do I have to do a degree in the subject I am planning on teaching? One last question: if I did an English degree but decided I wanted to teach pe would it be enough to have an AS in pe or do I need a full a level in pe to teach it?

Thank you

Every secondary school teacher is qualified to teach to subjects; their specialism (eg. mine is RE) and a subsidiary/second subject (eg. mine is English). Technically because I have carried both of these to degree level (I do a B.Ed so I'm in straight teacher training) I can teach them both to A-Level. However, because most schools have enough in each department its unlikely I'll be able to teach English beyond GCSE (if even that). Basically if you have two subjects that you teach but the likelyhood is you'll only get to teach your second subject at KS3. Also, any teacher can teach subjects such as personal development.

There tends to be a general rule of thumb among teachers though that if you have carried a subject to A-Level you can teach it to GCSE.
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Amie_dancer
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(Original post by l'insegnante)
Every secondary school teacher is qualified to teach to subjects; their specialism (eg. mine is RE) and a subsidiary/second subject (eg. mine is English). Technically because I have carried both of these to degree level (I do a B.Ed so I'm in straight teacher training) I can teach them both to A-Level. However, because most schools have enough in each department its unlikely I'll be able to teach English beyond GCSE (if even that). Basically if you have two subjects that you teach but the likelyhood is you'll only get to teach your second subject at KS3. Also, any teacher can teach subjects such as personal development.

There tends to be a general rule of thumb among teachers though that if you have carried a subject to A-Level you can teach it to GCSE.
Ah I see, so if I did my degree in pe for example I could teach English at GCSE because I will have done a full A Leve in it? What happens if I drop a subject at AS does that mean I can't teach it at GCSE? Thank you for your help
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myrtille
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(Original post by l'insegnante)
Every secondary school teacher is qualified to teach to subjects; their specialism (eg. mine is RE) and a subsidiary/second subject (eg. mine is English). Technically because I have carried both of these to degree level (I do a B.Ed so I'm in straight teacher training) I can teach them both to A-Level. However, because most schools have enough in each department its unlikely I'll be able to teach English beyond GCSE (if even that). Basically if you have two subjects that you teach but the likelyhood is you'll only get to teach your second subject at KS3. Also, any teacher can teach subjects such as personal development.

There tends to be a general rule of thumb among teachers though that if you have carried a subject to A-Level you can teach it to GCSE.
Sorry, but this is nonsense (except the last bit).

When you get QTS (Qualified Teacher Status) you are a qualified teacher. Although during the PGCE you specialise in a specific subject area, you are theoretically qualified to teach anything (although you would struggle to get a job outside your specialist subject). I know someone who is a dance/drama/music specialist, but is currently teaching English most of the time (with a little bit of dance on their timetable). I also work with a DT teacher who teaches some Science on their timetable.

Basically, once you're a qualified teacher, you can teach any subject area that your Head thinks you are able to teach and requires you to do so. The likelihood of this actually happening depends a lot on your school and subject (eg: if your subject doesn't have a lot of timetabled hours, eg: dance, you are more likely to find yourself teaching other subjects to make your timetable up to full time, whereas an English teacher will probably just be needed to teach English).

To the OP:
You need to do a degree in the subject area you plan on teaching, followed by a PGCE (or other teacher training programme) in that subject area. Have a look at what PGCE courses are available and what jobs are advertised on TES - I can't imagine there's that much demand for specialist dance teachers who can't teach any other areas.

A PE/Sports based degree with a focus on dance could be a safer bet - PE teachers often teach dance as part of PE.

If your heart is set on teaching dance, you could always look at options outside of the school system - pursue dance exams through your dancing school and do their teaching qualification. This won't qualify you to teach in schools, but you could run your own dancing school and/or offer extra-curricular clubs in different schools. Running your own business is hard work and unreliable money though.
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l'insegnante
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(Original post by myrtille)
Sorry, but this is nonsense (except the last bit).

When you get QTS (Qualified Teacher Status) you are a qualified teacher. Although during the PGCE you specialise in a specific subject area, you are theoretically qualified to teach anything (although you would struggle to get a job outside your specialist subject). I know someone who is a dance/drama/music specialist, but is currently teaching English most of the time (with a little bit of dance on their timetable). I also work with a DT teacher who teaches some Science on their timetable.

Basically, once you're a qualified teacher, you can teach any subject area that your Head thinks you are able to teach and requires you to do so. The likelihood of this actually happening depends a lot on your school and subject (eg: if your subject doesn't have a lot of timetabled hours, eg: dance, you are more likely to find yourself teaching other subjects to make your timetable up to full time, whereas an English teacher will probably just be needed to teach English).

To the OP:
You need to do a degree in the subject area you plan on teaching, followed by a PGCE (or other teacher training programme) in that subject area. Have a look at what PGCE courses are available and what jobs are advertised on TES - I can't imagine there's that much demand for specialist dance teachers who can't teach any other areas.

A PE/Sports based degree with a focus on dance could be a safer bet - PE teachers often teach dance as part of PE.

If your heart is set on teaching dance, you could always look at options outside of the school system - pursue dance exams through your dancing school and do their teaching qualification. This won't qualify you to teach in schools, but you could run your own dancing school and/or offer extra-curricular clubs in different schools. Running your own business is hard work and unreliable money though.
How is it nonsense? When a school employs a teacher for a specific subject they are looking for someone who has specialized in that subject. A school is hardly going to employ me as a Maths teacher when my degree is a B.Ed RE with subsid English. Especially since I didn't carry maths beyond GCSE.
You're friend teaching English whilst being qualified for Drama isn't that big of a leap considering how much of a link there is between the two subjects, and he/she probably has done English beyond GCSE.
Furthermore, what I said about any teacher being allowed to teach things like Personal Development is correct.
What I said about me likely not being needed to teach much English is correct considering that English departments are usually one of the biggest in the school.
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l'insegnante
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(Original post by Amie_dancer)
Ah I see, so if I did my degree in pe for example I could teach English at GCSE because I will have done a full A Leve in it? What happens if I drop a subject at AS does that mean I can't teach it at GCSE? Thank you for your help
In theory, yes. However it depends of the school you are employed by. They may have enough English teachers and employ you to teach PE and another subject you have carried to A-Level or Personal Development and the like or both.

Have you thought about undergraduate teacher training?

Heres a link to come courses that would lead to QTS without a PGCE

English: http://search.ucas.com/search/provid...=&SubjectCode=

PE : http://search.ucas.com/search/provid...=&SubjectCode=
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myrtille
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(Original post by l'insegnante)
How is it nonsense? When a school employs a teacher for a specific subject they are looking for someone who has specialized in that subject. A school is hardly going to employ me as a Maths teacher when my degree is a B.Ed RE with subsid English. Especially since I didn't carry maths beyond GCSE.
You're friend teaching English whilst being qualified for Drama isn't that big of a leap considering how much of a link there is between the two subjects, and he/she probably has done English beyond GCSE.
Furthermore, what I said about any teacher being allowed to teach things like Personal Development is correct.
What I said about me likely not being needed to teach much English is correct considering that English departments are usually one of the biggest in the school.
You said "Every secondary school teacher is qualified to teach two subjects; their specialism (eg. mine is RE) and a subsidiary/second subject (eg. mine is English)"

This is simply not the case. You are qualified to teach. Not to teach a subject.

What subjects you teach is at the discretion of your employer and is usually the one you did your degree and PGCE in, but not necessarily.

So it's not a case of "any teacher being allowed to teach things like Personal Development". Any teacher is allowed to teach anything at all (not just their specialist subject and "subsidiary"), it's just unlikely to happen.
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l'insegnante
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(Original post by myrtille)
You said "Every secondary school teacher is qualified to teach two subjects; their specialism (eg. mine is RE) and a subsidiary/second subject (eg. mine is English)"

This is simply not the case. You are qualified to teach. Not to teach a subject.

What subjects you teach is at the discretion of your employer and is usually the one you did your degree and PGCE in, but not necessarily.

So it's not a case of "any teacher being allowed to teach things like Personal Development". Any teacher is allowed to teach anything at all (not just their specialist subject and "subsidiary"), it's just unlikely to happen.
Why do you assume everyone does a PGCE?

When a person trains to teach whether it be through PGCE, Undergrad or another organisation, they apply for a specific subject or combination of subjects. Therefore once graduation takes place they are qualified to teach those subjects no matter what any employer thinks as they are trained specifically to teach those subjects. Sure an employer can allow them to teach a subject they have not trained in or they can do top up courses giving them the knowledge to teach other subjects. But if someone graduates with a PGCE in English and Drama, in theory as a teacher they may have the opportunity to teach maths however that doesn't mean they are qualified enough to teach it; hence extra courses for teachers. Plus if the person isn't good at Maths they are not qualified to teach it.

Why do you have subsidiary is inverted commas? If your being sarcy, thats what a second subject is called in the Northern Ireland teacher education system so no need to insinuate sarcasm.
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