eatthetree
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  • Should have an intro on what you will talk about and the side you will be arguing for
  • 25 marker should have 4 points in it
  • A balanced argument (You can't get high marks without a balanced argument)
  • Use of political terminology for high AO3 level
  • Use up to date examples/evidence
  • Make a clear judgment on your conclusion
  • Link back to the question for your final sentence in the paragraph


I like to use this structure for helping me in exams...

Intro

Para 1 For
Point
Evidence
Explain

Para 2 Against
Point
Evidence
Explain

Para 3 For
Point
Evidence
Explain

Para 4 Against
Point
Evidence
Explain

Conc.

------------------------------------------

This is the structure I use for the 25 Marker.

I always write a plan to begin with. I whack down anything relevant to the question and then block everything out in a bullet points before starting the answer.

I go alternate in case I run out of time in the exam. Better to have a balanced short 25 marker then not balanced. If you are running out of time finish the paragraph your on and move to your conclusion and focus on making it a good one. It should be chunky, weighing up all the points and making a clear judgment.

Note: Mark schemes only used to ask for 3 points to gain level 3 marks however now they seem to be asking for 4 points. Also this is a rough guide, questions are worded differently as well meaning you may need to change your structure accordingly. I would make a guide for each of the types of questions they could word. E.g. "Asses the advantaged, to what extent.... etc."

Look at a model answer or mark scheme to find out exactly what they require to get the top levels in order to be getting 20+ out of 25.

Hope this helps, any further questions don't hesitate to ask
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username1500433
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Nice guide. Just thought I'd add that not all 25 mark questions require a balanced argument. For Example, "Make out a case against the adoption of a codified constitution for the UK."
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Bonnie and Clyde
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Nice guide, I was taught in a similar way but there are some slight differences. My teacher is an examiner and she attends all of them boring examiners meetings and they taught her the preferred or correct way of answering 25 mark questions in politics.

Say for example, the question is: How effectively does representative democracy operate in the UK? (from Jan 2012). This is the structure examiners prefer to see or encourage:

Introduction
-Define what a representative democracy is
-Provide both views of the argument in the intro
-Make your argument clear (preferably ending the intro with the side you're going to argue)

1st Paragraph
-Point: Representative democracy does not operate effectively in the UK.
-Example, whatever examples you may have
-Explain the argument further, develop it, throw in some political terms, etc
-COUNTER ARGUMENT - Dismiss the point you made in the first sentence

2nd Paragraph
-Point: Representative democracy does not operate effectively in the UK.
-Example, whatever examples you may have
-Explain the argument further, develop it, throw in some political terms, etc
-COUNTER ARGUMENT - Dismiss the point you made in the first sentence

3rd Paragraph
-Point: Representative democracy does not operate effectively in the UK.
-Example, whatever examples you may have
-Explain the argument further, develop it, throw in some political terms, etc
-COUNTER ARGUMENT - Dismiss the point you made in the first sentence

4th Paragraph
-Point: Representative democracy does not operate effectively in the UK.
-Example, whatever examples you may have
-Explain the argument further, develop it, throw in some political terms, etc
-COUNTER ARGUMENT - Dismiss the point you made in the first sentence

Conclusion
-Conclude your argument

This, according to Edexcel examiners, is the preferred way and will always guarantee you high marks. I got an A in the exam while following this structure.

ALTERNATIVELY: If the side you are arguing is introduced in the POINT stage (first sentence of the paragraph), after the counter argument you should include a concluding sentence to dismiss the counter argument and reinforce your main point. Example:

Paragraph
-Point: Representative democracy does not operate effectively in the UK.
-Example, whatever examples you may have
-Explain the argument further, develop it, throw in some political terms, etc
-COUNTER ARGUMENT - Dismiss the point you made in the first sentence
-Mini-Conclusion - dismiss the counter argument, reinforce your first point

But, this is much better for 45 markers (since you gotta write more for them) though they can be used for 25 markers too.

(Original post by will_jg)
Nice guide. Just thought I'd add that not all 25 mark questions require a balanced argument. For Example, "Make out a case against the adoption of a codified constitution for the UK."
That's true but it rarely ever happens now. I wouldn't count on it happening this year or anytime soon (last time it did I think was 2010), so it's always best you're ready for a balanced argument and have enough counter arguments.
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