Does anyone do AQA Classical civilisation A2? option CIV3B / CIV4C? help!!!!

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rainbowraining7
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Hi guys. I'm currently struggling through A2 classical civilisation (AQA) and I seriously need help with resources! I do CIV3B - The Persian Wars, a comparison of Herodotus the histories and Aeschylus The Persians along with CIV4C, Virgil's Aeneid. I'm self teaching myself and it's ok, but I really really don't have the resources I need especially with the persian wars, I can barely find anything where Aeschylus is concerned. If anyone on here is doing these modules (or one of them), could you please tell me what resources you use / how your teacher covers the course / where they get support materials? I have read the texts but my problem is that I have no sample essays! Last year, the mark schemes were way more comprehensive. With the 40 mark essays, I can't find the content to cover the question. I did find 2 good scripts on the AQA website on the persian wars and I need more like that! I would be SO thankful if I could even get a little bit of help with either side of the course. I'll try my best to repay you!!! Thanks a mill !
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***OpenSky***
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I did classics last year- unfortunately none of your modules.
what I can say is that any relevant information you pick up from anywhere, so the internet a book and so on use it in your essays. the mark schemes will always credit any relevant responses.
if its possible go to a local universities library and speak to someone there for recommendations and also look in the bookshop. they'll most likely be more than happy to help. find a few books on your topics and get as much info as possible.
if you can fill up your essays with facts and dates youll do well.
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rainbowraining7
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(Original post by ***OpenSky***)
I did classics last year- unfortunately none of your modules.
what I can say is that any relevant information you pick up from anywhere, so the internet a book and so on use it in your essays. the mark schemes will always credit any relevant responses.
if its possible go to a local universities library and speak to someone there for recommendations and also look in the bookshop. they'll most likely be more than happy to help. find a few books on your topics and get as much info as possible.
if you can fill up your essays with facts and dates youll do well.
That's actually brilliant advice -really helpful! Great hearing from someone who's come put the other end. Thanks so much for taking the time to reply to me, I really do appreciate it did you have any particular structure you were advised to follow for the 20/40 mark essays, or just any general essay writing tips if you don't mind me asking? Thanks again!!
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***OpenSky***
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(Original post by rainbowraining7)
That's actually brilliant advice -really helpful! Great hearing from someone who's come put the other end. Thanks so much for taking the time to reply to me, I really do appreciate it did you have any particular structure you were advised to follow for the 20/40 mark essays, or just any general essay writing tips if you don't mind me asking? Thanks again!!

happy to help when I was studying classics I felt out of my depth for quite a while as we didn't do practise essays but getting to know the markschemes really helped. so for example what I did was find all the twenty mark questions on the aqa website and note down the main points of the mark scheme. I then came up with a few ideas of my own- basically guessing at what could come up on the twenty mark essays. its good revision even if your guesses don't come up.

in terms of structure we didn't really have any specific tips or models. what I did was always an introduction paragraph and a closing paragraph which answered the question very clearly. because theres so many facts to write about it can be hard to actually answer the question.

for the main part of the essay I would always do one or two paragraphs per point/ piece of evidence and always present the opposing evidence if there was any at the same time. basically like putting together an argument and then adding which side of the argument you favoured at the end of each paragraph- and picking apart the faults in the side you didn't favour.
the closing few paragraphs would sum up the points for and against and state your opinion.

what I would do is check the exam papers and see if there is a forty mark question that comes up regularly. for my module we studied two historians and without fail one of the forty mark questions would be on them. I basically practised an essay I could write so one of the longer essays was already in the bag before I went in.

hope this helps
not to say this in a bragging way but I got an A*. I wouldn't have imagined getting that at the beginning of a levels. but I felt like I found a method that works.
as long as you have plenty of facts, present both sides of an argument and answer the question very clearly im sure youll do great
good luck!
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rainbowraining7
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(Original post by ***OpenSky***)
happy to help when I was studying classics I felt out of my depth for quite a while as we didn't do practise essays but getting to know the markschemes really helped. so for example what I did was find all the twenty mark questions on the aqa website and note down the main points of the mark scheme. I then came up with a few ideas of my own- basically guessing at what could come up on the twenty mark essays. its good revision even if your guesses don't come up.

in terms of structure we didn't really have any specific tips or models. what I did was always an introduction paragraph and a closing paragraph which answered the question very clearly. because theres so many facts to write about it can be hard to actually answer the question.

for the main part of the essay I would always do one or two paragraphs per point/ piece of evidence and always present the opposing evidence if there was any at the same time. basically like putting together an argument and then adding which side of the argument you favoured at the end of each paragraph- and picking apart the faults in the side you didn't favour.
the closing few paragraphs would sum up the points for and against and state your opinion.

what I would do is check the exam papers and see if there is a forty mark question that comes up regularly. for my module we studied two historians and without fail one of the forty mark questions would be on them. I basically practised an essay I could write so one of the longer essays was already in the bag before I went in.

hope this helps
not to say this in a bragging way but I got an A*. I wouldn't have imagined getting that at the beginning of a levels. but I felt like I found a method that works.
as long as you have plenty of facts, present both sides of an argument and answer the question very clearly im sure youll do great
good luck!
Was going to ask what you got...that's amazing!!!! I couldn't imagine an A* in an A level, you must have really known your stuff! Massive well done, seriously tough to get that with the amount of detail that would be required.
Your help is invaluable. I actually feel as though I know what I'm doing now and I could structure essays alright if I understand the texts fully. I'm definitely going to try and approach revising for classical civilisation in this way now. I'll especially remember what you said about referring to the key terms of the qu and really approaching it like a two-sided argument. One more thing (so sorry!), did you integrate many quotes into your essays? And did you pick the quotes yourself, just by going through the books in detail? Sounds like a basic thing I should know, but I really haven't been giving too much time up to classics, hope I get enough time to revise everything!
Thanks so very much for all your help. Absolutely brilliant advice from a classics pro!
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