Snugglasaurus
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Hi,

I have a couple of questions regarding 'insurance' (backup) choices when accepting multiple postgrad offers.

I have currently accepted one of my offers (my first choice), but would like to also accept the second as an insurance choice. Am I allowed to do this?

It's also worth mentioning both courses have made the same offer of a UK first, however I have been told that sometimes universities will accept you even if you don't achieve this. Is this correct? The second choice university is Bath if that makes a difference.

I have been given 6 weeks to accept the offer from Bath. The letter also states "You have the right to cancel your contract with the University within 14 days if you decide to accept this offer to study"

This, to me, implies I cannot use this as an insurance offer. Am I correct?

Thank you in advance for your help!
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Andrew657Thomas
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You can't accept multiple offers.

When you are given an offer (most likely you will have to achieve certain grades) therefor if you accept an offer that asks you to get a A* in the course you are on you have to get a A* for them to fully accept you.

They have already basically half accepted you, you just need to get the grades.

I hope this helps, if you do need more help/advice just quote this post , so I get a notification.
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Snugglasaurus
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Thank you! It's not what I hoped to hear but it's what I suspected...

Thanks
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sj27
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(Original post by Andrew657Thomas)
You can't accept multiple offers.

When you are given an offer (most likely you will have to achieve certain grades) therefor if you accept an offer that asks you to get a A* in the course you are on you have to get a A* for them to fully accept you.

They have already basically half accepted you, you just need to get the grades.

I hope this helps, if you do need more help/advice just quote this post , so I get a notification.
This doesn't apply to postgrad. People can and do accept multiple offers. Part of the reason is that funding often determines whether or not someone can actually attend, and funding decisions can come months afterr the actual offer. When the applicant has decided which uni to attend, they subsequently decline the other offers (or if they get no funding and cannot self-fund they may have to decline all of them). Another reason that the OP alludes to but doesn't actually apply to his case is that some offers are more lenient than others. Top unis typically make twice as many offers as they expect people to actually take them up at postgrad, for these reasons - they know a significant portion of those who accept will not end up actually accepting.

OP, the Bath system seems somewhat confusing to me. Usually what unis do to discourage being an 'insurance' is to require a non-refundable deposit on acceptance of the offer, though this is still quite rare.

OP, yes sometimes unis will still take you if you miss your offer, but it depends on a nunber of things including how far your miss is, the strength of the rest of the cohort, etc.
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Snugglasaurus
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(Original post by sj27)
This doesn't apply to postgrad. People can and do accept multiple offers. Part of the reason is that funding often determines whether or not someone can actually attend, and funding decisions can come months afterr the actual offer. When the applicant has decided which uni to attend, they subsequently decline the other offers (or if they get no funding and cannot self-fund they may have to decline all of them). Another reason that the OP alludes to but doesn't actually apply to his case is that some offers are more lenient than others. Top unis typically make twice as many offers as they expect people to actually take them up at postgrad, for these reasons - they know a significant portion of those who accept will not end up actually accepting.

OP, the Bath system seems somewhat confusing to me. Usually what unis do to discourage being an 'insurance' is to require a non-refundable deposit on acceptance of the offer, though this is still quite rare.

OP, yes sometimes unis will still take you if you miss your offer, but it depends on a nunber of things including how far your miss is, the strength of the rest of the cohort, etc.

Thank you for your reply. Please see below the exact parts of the letter I received referring to the acceptance of the offer (with personal details removed..):

Date of this letter: xxxxxxxx
Please respond within 6 weeks to reserve your place.

...
...

Replying to your offer
You must indicate whether you wish to accept your place in the 'Track Application Progress' box on your Bath Application Tracker.


(The ''Track Application Progress' box' page is just a tick box with accept/decline and a submit button - no indication of what comes next).

Right to cancel
You have the right to cancel your contract with the University within 14 days if you decide to accept this offer to study. This is the point that you formally accept your offer to study via your Bath Application Tracker. If you change your mind and wish to cancel the contract then please notify the University within 14 days of your formal acceptance of this offer.



Can you extract any more information from this? Or perhaps have a better insight in to what it means when accepting multiple offers? Thanks
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sj27
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I still find it confusing. What is the "contract" and are its terms specified anywhere? Can they actually do anything if you accept and cancel after 14 days?
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Snugglasaurus
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(Original post by sj27)
I still find it confusing. What is the "contract" and are its terms specified anywhere? Can they actually do anything if you accept and cancel after 14 days?
I have found these pages (by googling...):

http://www.bath.ac.uk/pg-offer-holders/

http://www.bath.ac.uk/study/pg/apply...rms/index.html

But neither appear to hold any content regarding cancelling my acceptance of the offer.

I can't imagine there would be anything they could do if I did cancel it after 14 days, unless I need to provide something further once I select the 'accept' button. I think I might just click accept to find out soon... No real downside: either I'm going to have to reject it anyway or they'll let me keep it as an insurance.

I'm assuming the 'contract' appears at the next step because I can find nothing contract-related that mentions cancelling an accepted offer.
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sj27
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Yeah, almost sounds like it's designed to make you think there are consequences so...call their bluff I'm sure they don't have a leg to stand on if they require you to accept a contract before giving you info on what its terms might be.
The only real consequence is if they require you to pay a deposit.

If you do accept and then end up not taking the offer, of course the right thing is to let them know as soon as you have decided in case they have someone else waitlisted.
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arguendo
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OP - I would just ask Bath. That's what I did when I was in your position, and my choices were very good at explaining clearly whether there were any consequences or not.

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sj27
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(Original post by arguendo)
OP - I would just ask Bath. That's what I did when I was in your position, and my choices were very good at explaining clearly whether there were any consequences or not.

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For the ones that did have consequences, can you elaborate on what these were and how the uni would implement them?
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Snugglasaurus
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(Original post by arguendo)
OP - I would just ask Bath. That's what I did when I was in your position, and my choices were very good at explaining clearly whether there were any consequences or not.

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I think this is a good idea.. I should probably talk them directly for exact info.

(Original post by sj27)
Yeah, almost sounds like it's designed to make you think there are consequences so...call their bluff I'm sure they don't have a leg to stand on if they require you to accept a contract before giving you info on what its terms might be.
The only real consequence is if they require you to pay a deposit.

If you do accept and then end up not taking the offer, of course the right thing is to let them know as soon as you have decided in case they have someone else waitlisted.
Of course!
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arguendo
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(Original post by sj27)
For the ones that did have consequences, can you elaborate on what these were and how the uni would implement them?
None of the ones I asked did - I was only interested in accepting two universities, and fortunately neither entailed a financial commitment.

However, at least one of the masters courses that I declined required a not insignificant nonrefundable deposit in order to accept, and I declined in large part because of this.

No idea on other academic institutions in general. I know that for a graduate professional training course that I have accepted at a university (so not postgraduate academic study), if I do not withdraw by a specific deadline (before the course starts), I will not only lose my deposit but also become liable for a percentage of the tuition fees. I imagine that would be implemented as breach of contract. That may be somehow totally inapplicable to academic courses, but the fine print in that experience has made me particularly wary and thus I prefer to seek clarification before I commit.

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sj27
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(Original post by arguendo)
None of the ones I asked did - I was only interested in accepting two universities, and fortunately neither entailed a financial commitment.

However, at least one of the masters courses that I declined required a not insignificant nonrefundable deposit in order to accept, and I declined in large part because of this.

No idea on other academic institutions in general. I know that for a graduate professional training course that I have accepted at a university (so not postgraduate academic study), if I do not withdraw by a specific deadline (before the course starts), I will not only lose my deposit but also become liable for a percentage of the tuition fees. I imagine that would be implemented as breach of contract. That may be somehow totally inapplicable to academic courses, but the fine print in that experience has made me particularly wary and thus I prefer to seek clarification before I commit.

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Thanks - that's pretty much what I thoight - absent a deposit there's not much they can do.
Re the % of tuition fees - never heard that for an academic course - but that would be unenforceable without signing a contract clearly stating those terms.
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Snugglasaurus
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(Original post by sj27)
Thanks - that's pretty much what I thoight - absent a deposit there's not much they can do.
Re the % of tuition fees - never heard that for an academic course - but that would be unenforceable without signing a contract clearly stating those terms.
Okay - going to talk to my careers advisor at uni, talk to Bath and then probably accept the offer. Then we'll see what happens!
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alleycat393
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I have heard of some unis asking for a tuition fee deposit so maybe that's what they're referring to but until you've put down a deposit and signed something I wouldn't worry about it.
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