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Shazza786
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Hello all, this is my first time using TSR and I would like to take this short moment to thank you for reading this question and would appreciate an answer.

I've been searching up radiology salaries in the US and UK and have found that there is a huge gap in earnings. It seems that in America they make much more than they do in the US.
So what I'm asking is why is there a huge difference in pay, and how much do radiologists actually make? Thank you
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Asklepios
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It's not just radiologists, but medical professionals of all specialities make more in the USA than the UK. The vast majority of doctors in the UK work for the public sector (NHS) so have a fixed annual salary. In the USA however, doctors work in the private sector and hospitals work like businesses so their earnings are dependent on profit, making them higher than in the UK.


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7589200
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Lets say you're an interventional radiologist in London, you can earn easily £250,000+. Say you're a non-interventional radiologist in some small town in Scotland, £100,000.
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Chief Wiggum
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(Original post by 7589200)
Lets say you're an interventional radiologist in London, you can earn easily £250,000+. Say you're a non-interventional radiologist in some small town in Scotland, £100,000.
Is London where high private incomes tend to be? Perhaps naively, I assumed private income would be pretty independent of location.
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scrawlx101
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what about psychologists?
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taysidefrog
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Private income is concentrated round cities and particularly affluent southern cities. I'm a GP in Fife and very few of my patients have private insurance and use the private system so Fife radiologists won't make a lot of private income like the other consultants here. Edinburgh has some private medicine and Dundee but it's small compared to London.
The up side is you get to live in Scotland rather than London and there's only so much money you need and houses cost a fortune in London so you're better living in a cheaper area and going hill walking or cycling in the beautiful countryside. Have just spent the day orienteering training in a gorgeous forest and sand dunes by the sea in Fife in the sunshine. You can keep your flashies and flunkies.
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taysidefrog
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Flashy flunkies, not flashies and flunkies https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QGX47gZhC-8
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Brachioradialis
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Keep in mind that in the US your costs of practising are much higher. Generally US physicians have huge debts to repay and don't get anywhere near paying it off until well after residency. You also have higher insurance costs for medico-legal affairs. Lastly your taxation is higher.

Overall though you'd still walk away with more than UK physicians, but is it worth it for the USMLE (apparently hell), potentially more stressful lifestyle with those medico-legal issues, and the cost of not being near your friends and family back home?
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navarre
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They also get sued more than in the UK. Also, doctors in the UK are pretty well paid anyways (consultants earn minimum of £75,000 on an NHS salary and can supplement this with private work), and don't have the same levels of debt American doctors have, who rack up extortionate amounts via medical school (usually much more than £9,000/year) and their four year undergraduate degree before medical school.
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nexttime
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(Original post by Chief Wiggum)
Is London where high private incomes tend to be? Perhaps naively, I assumed private income would be pretty independent of location.
a) Most rich people are in or around London b) It has the best transport connections C) All the best doctors are in London don't y'know? Surely you didn't think that private patients actually did any research or looked at anything beyond the hospital name and how many grey hairs the doctor has did you?

Of course there will be some in other cities too. Just not as much and not the mega high paying stuff.
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Okorange
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(Original post by MJK91)
Keep in mind that in the US your costs of practising are much higher. Generally US physicians have huge debts to repay and don't get anywhere near paying it off until well after residency. You also have higher insurance costs for medico-legal affairs. Lastly your taxation is higher.

Overall though you'd still walk away with more than UK physicians, but is it worth it for the USMLE (apparently hell), potentially more stressful lifestyle with those medico-legal issues, and the cost of not being near your friends and family back home?
Taxation is generally lower in the US isn't it? Also, if they have their own clinic they often can expense things like cars and offices etc.
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nexttime
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(Original post by Okorange)
Taxation is generally lower in the US isn't it? Also, if they have their own clinic they often can expense things like cars and offices etc.
Below £100,000pa the difference is small. Whilst americans talk about small government a lot, they simultaneously spend one motherload of money on the army and have higher government spending on healthcare than we do.
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Brachioradialis
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(Original post by Okorange)
Taxation is generally lower in the US isn't it? Also, if they have their own clinic they often can expense things like cars and offices etc.
Rates are maginally lower but the tax-free threshold is lower, and it also depends largely on whether you're single, married, married filing separately and so on.
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solarplexus
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****ing tax ruins everything
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Kemfash
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Who earns higher in the UK, a radiologist or pharmacist?
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AnonymousPenguin
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(Original post by 7589200)
Lets say you're an interventional radiologist in London, you can earn easily £250,000+. Say you're a non-interventional radiologist in some small town in Scotland, £100,000.
Very unlikely this is true. I really don't think there is comparatively much scope for interventional work in the private sector. In the NHS you are looking at 72-80k GBP when you start as a consultant. The number is the same everywhere, so in London your quality of life really isn't that great.

In the US you are probably looking at 200-250k USD, but you do also have to pay out a lot in student loan repayments. Nevertheless, after adjusting for living costs americans probably make at least double what the UK radiologists do. Specialist medicine in general pays better outside the UK, while GP pays less than in the UK.

Another factor to consider is that becoming a radiologist in the US is a lot more competitive and the job market is significantly tougher. In the UK there is a very real shortage, whereas in the US the market is oversupplied with a downward pressure on wages.

Source: someone who actually is trying to get radiology training, i.e. me.
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AnonymousPenguin
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(Original post by Kemfash)
Who earns higher in the UK, a radiologist or pharmacist?
Pharmacy remuneration is in a tailspin and never was that amazing.
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thegodofgod
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(Original post by Kemfash)
Who earns higher in the UK, a radiologist or pharmacist?
As above, if you're looking at just salaries, then a consultant radiologist would probably earn £75k+, whereas a bog-standard community pharmacist would probably earn £40k+. Bear in mind, though, that pharmacists can command this salary 1 year out of a degree, it's just that pay doesn't increase significantly afterwards unless you take on extra responsibilities, e.g. pharmacy store manager, where you could command £50k+.

In hospital it starts off low (band 5 = £21k) straight out of university as a pre-registration pharmacist, then band 6 as a after you've qualified as a pharmacist a year later (£26-34k), then band 7 as a specialist pharmacist (£31-40k), then band 8a as a advanced pharmacist (£39-47k), band 8b as a lead pharmacist for a specialty (£46-57k), band 8c as a consultant pharmacist or deputy chief pharmacist (£55-67k), and band 8d or 9 as a chief pharmacist (based on the size of the pharmacy department and hospital, £65-98k). Realistically, you could get from band 5 to band 9 within 15 years, so you could be earning £98k by the age of 40. However, the higher up you go, the more office-based and less clinical your job will become.
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Hanover_mazoMD
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200-250K for interventional radiologist in USA sounds very low, Interventional Radiology was one of the most competitive specialties in this year's Match . Diagnostic radiologists start around 250K only at the very lowest out of residency. Average diagnostic salaries are around 490K. Most IR command in excess of 450-500K with malpractice insurance coverage paid for by employer or practice. As a partner 500K plus jobs are not unheard off.
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