NHS - type 2 diabetes medical exemption views Watch

georgem93
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Controversial issue, I'm aware, however, I want to know what everyone else thinks.

Whilst the NHS is in such a dire financial situation, which is consequently reducing the standard of patient care, people with type 2 diabetes continue to get free prescriptions.

Type 2 diabetes is caused by life-style factor, therefore some people class it as self-inflicted. The cost to the nhs of the medicines used to treat type 2 diabetes is astronomical, £36 for one months supply of dapaglioflozin, £70 for a months supple of lixisenatide etc etc.

Type 2 diabetics get medical exemption, which means that they pay nothing for their prescriptions, as a 'self-inflicted' disease, do you think they are entitled to the medical exemption?

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mangomango
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Hi ,

Yes I think they should deserve a medical exemption. One because not all type two can be classed as from lifestyle factors. Genetics and ethic background can play a role. Also if the nhs did not give a medical exemption then many people would refuse to pay for their medicine which can lead to life threatening conditions and possibly death. That ethically is wrong but also has costs on ambulance services. Also many people may not be able to afford prescriptions. The bottom line is that the nhs are here to help others.

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georgem93
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(Original post by mangomango)
Hi ,

Yes I think they should deserve a medical exemption. One because not all type two can be classed as from lifestyle factors. Genetics and ethic background can play a role. Also if the nhs did not give a medical exemption then many people would refuse to pay for their medicine which can lead to life threatening conditions and possibly death. That ethically is wrong but also has costs on ambulance services. Also many people may not be able to afford prescriptions. The bottom line is that the nhs are here to help others.

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There's a prescription pre-payme£nt certificate that costs less than £10 a month and covers any prescription the patient may be given.
You say they need the medication, yes, they do, however, people with asthma, COPD, emphysema etc also need their medicines, however they do not get a medical exemption, they have to pay for their medicine. Similarly, the use of statins to prevent heart attack and other forms of CVD has reached out to millions of patients, again, they have to pay, why is it not free for these people, yet it is free for type 2 diabetics?
How do they decide what disease are worthy of medical exemption and which ones aren't?
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Etomidate
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(Original post by georgem93)
The cost to the nhs of the medicines used to treat type 2 diabetes is astronomical, £36 for one months supply of dapaglioflozin, £70 for a months supple of lixisenatide etc etc.
What percentage of type II diabetics use drugs like dapagliflozin and lixisenatide?

Is this a significant proportion compared to those simply on metformin (£1.30/month) +/- gliclazide (£3.30/month)?

Also, what would be the subsequent cost of treating the inevitable increase in heart attacks, strokes, CKD and peripheral vascular disease when a subgroup of DMT2 patients stop taking their now non-funded medications?
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A5ko
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You can't really start asking people to fund their own care due to self infliction. If we do, where does it end?

Anyone who smokes?
Anyone who drinks?
Anyone who injurers themselves whilst sky diving?
Anyone that drives and has a crash?
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falling
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(Original post by A5ko)
You can't really start asking people to fund their own care due to self infliction. If we do, where does it end?

Anyone who smokes?
Anyone who drinks?
Anyone who injurers themselves whilst sky diving?
Anyone that drives and has a crash?
This. Where do you draw the line? ANY lifestyle choice by this logic doesn't warrant treatment.


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georgem93
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This is exactly what my question is -
Type 1 diabetes - genetic
Hypo/hyperthyroidism isn't avoidable
Cancer
All of the above warrant free prescriptions...
Asthma can be classed as 'self-inflicted' in some cases, same as high blood pressure, high cholesterol etc, these people don't get medical exeption, yet type 2 diabetics do..
I'm simply just asking how this is decided?

The examples of car crash etc are very extreme and completely out of proportion.
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georgem93
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(Original post by Etomidate)
What percentage of type II diabetics use drugs like dapagliflozin and lixisenatide?

Is this a significant proportion compared to those simply on metformin (£1.30/month) +/- gliclazide (£3.30/month)?

Also, what would be the subsequent cost of treating the inevitable increase in heart attacks, strokes, CKD and peripheral vascular disease when a subgroup of DMT2 patients stop taking their now non-funded medications?

There has been a HUGE increase in the amount of Lyxumia, victoza, Byetta, sitagliptin etc being prescribed. £1.30 for metformin? That's inaccurate information.. £1.56 is the cost for just 28 tablets, some patients are taking 8 daily, modified release are more expensive and theyre used more.. And then the £15ish cost of testing strips, £5+ for lancets, it adds up very very quickly.
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Etomidate
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(Original post by georgem93)
There has been a HUGE increase in the amount of Lyxumia, victoza, Byetta, sitagliptin etc being prescribed. £1.30 for metformin? That's inaccurate information.. £1.56 is the cost for just 28 tablets, some patients are taking 8 daily, modified release are more expensive and theyre used more.. And then the £15ish cost of testing strips, £5+ for lancets, it adds up very very quickly.
My point is, the vast majority of DMT2s aren't taking those medications. Most are on your bread and butter biguanides and sulfonylureas which are dirt cheap in comparison. Again, your testing strips will only be for those using insulin, which is the minority.

The complications of diabetes are arguably incredibly expensive and come with massive morbidity. It's cheaper to fund these medications than not. The burden of disease that comes with poor compliance because of cost to the patient will outweigh the savings.

The listed conditions on the FP92A are up for government review anyway.
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