Despicable NHS Watch

Lionheart96
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#1
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http://www.expressandstar.com/news/c...-front-of-him/
This isn't just a one of case, i have seen patients with chest pain having to wait HOURS for a doctor to see them.
and seriously community service for failing to do your job and letting a man die in front of you, he should be locked up for manslaughter minimum
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AndersonRN
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(Original post by Lionheart96)
http://www.expressandstar.com/news/c...-front-of-him/
This isn't just a one of case, i have seen patients with chest pain having to wait HOURS for a doctor to see them.
and seriously community service for failing to do your job and letting a man die in front of you, he should be locked up for manslaughter minimum
The video shows a blatant abuse of his duty of care towards the patient and a situation where I'd expect a first aid trained civilian who passes by to try and resuscitate the man never mind an on-duty paramedic, he probably should be charged with manslaughter because he had a duty of care and failed to act.
As of doctors taking so long, this problem stems from government policy and general bad management within the NHS, however I do think they could prioritise people with potentially fatal problems in A&E.
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Helenia
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(Original post by Lionheart96)
http://www.expressandstar.com/news/c...-front-of-him/
This isn't just a one of case, i have seen patients with chest pain having to wait HOURS for a doctor to see them.
and seriously community service for failing to do your job and letting a man die in front of you, he should be locked up for manslaughter minimum
The reason he hasn't gone down for manslaughter is that the prosecutor would have to prove that the patient would have survived were it not for his negligence. Proving that beyond reasonable doubt would have been extremely difficult, as people still die from heart attacks even if they have the best possible treatment, so I expect they went for a lesser charge with a higher chance of prosecution.

(Original post by AndersonRN)
As of doctors taking so long, this problem stems from government policy and general bad management within the NHS, however I do think they could prioritise people with potentially fatal problems in A&E.
They do. It's called triage. It's still not perfect, as A&E is just so busy, but in general people are prioritised in order of clinical need.

Obviously we don't know the details about this case, but there are very well-defined pathways for chest pain. If the patient had ECG changes suggestive of a heart attack when the ambulance assessed him, he wouldn't even have gone to A&E - he'd have gone straight to the angiography suite for an angiogram. If he didn't, then taking him to A&E and waiting was the correct thing to do, and every A&E I know prioritises patients with chest pain. The article actually says that the patient left the waiting room to go to a shop after only 7 minutes waiting, so he may have missed his triage call as a result, which is tragic, but not the fault of "the NHS."

What the paramedic did was totally inexcusable, but the hospital themselves may have acted entirely correctly.
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AndersonRN
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I stand corrected as of my latter point.
Personally I think better ambulance care is the best way to reduce fatalities, obviously within reason regarding space in an ambulance and the financial ability to aquire specialist equipment, but anything that can reduce the stress on A&E departments and reduce deaths should be implemented,
Currently I don't think the NHS do enough in researching and providing better ambulance care, whether that would have helped in this case is another question, and slightly irrelevant to the OP...
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Etomidate
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(Original post by AndersonRN)
I stand corrected as of my latter point.
Personally I think better ambulance care is the best way to reduce fatalities, obviously within reason regarding space in an ambulance and the financial ability to aquire specialist equipment, but anything that can reduce the stress on A&E departments and reduce deaths should be implemented,
Currently I don't think the NHS do enough in researching and providing better ambulance care, whether that would have helped in this case is another question, and slightly irrelevant to the OP...
I agree. Every ambulance should have a cath lab.
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Lionheart96
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(Original post by Helenia)
The reason he hasn't gone down for manslaughter is that the prosecutor would have to prove that the patient would have survived were it not for his negligence. Proving that beyond reasonable doubt would have been extremely difficult, as people still die from heart attacks even if they have the best possible treatment, so I expect they went for a lesser charge with a higher chance of prosecution.


They do. It's called triage. It's still not perfect, as A&E is just so busy, but in general people are prioritised in order of clinical need.

Obviously we don't know the details about this case, but there are very well-defined pathways for chest pain. If the patient had ECG changes suggestive of a heart attack when the ambulance assessed him, he wouldn't even have gone to A&E - he'd have gone straight to the angiography suite for an angiogram. If he didn't, then taking him to A&E and waiting was the correct thing to do, and every A&E I know prioritises patients with chest pain. The article actually says that the patient left the waiting room to go to a shop after only 7 minutes waiting, so he may have missed his triage call as a result, which is tragic, but not the fault of "the NHS."

What the paramedic did was totally inexcusable, but the hospital themselves may have acted entirely correctly.
What i understood from this article was that he wasn't going to be charged whatsoever. He should still be charged for negligence if not for manslaughter. A few years in prison will do him some good.
The NHS is a good system on paper but in reality its slow, the standard of attention and care is dropping and the NHS is lacking adequate funding to obtain new and better equipment. Hospitals are crowded, the waiting times are horrendous its all just sad really.
The NHS needs more money poured into it, we need to stop the privatisation of healthcare and change the management up so as to cut down waiting times.
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Sephits
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Need to get more people working in it to cope with the changes in the make up of the population which are putting so much strain on the NHS and increasing waiting times, and maybe look at what as a society we can do to help the system in terms of things like diet and looking after ourselves rather than just relying on an already overstretched system that can't perform miracles the way we expect it to.
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moonkatt
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(Original post by Lionheart96)
What i understood from this article was that he wasn't going to be charged whatsoever. He should still be charged for negligence if not for manslaughter. A few years in prison will do him some good.
The NHS is a good system on paper but in reality its slow, the standard of attention and care is dropping and the NHS is lacking adequate funding to obtain new and better equipment. Hospitals are crowded, the waiting times are horrendous its all just sad really.
The NHS needs more money poured into it, we need to stop the privatisation of healthcare and change the management up so as to cut down waiting times.
He received an eight month jail term suspended for two years and will never work in a role where he's expected to care for people again.



(Original post by AndersonRN)
I stand corrected as of my latter point.
Personally I think better ambulance care is the best way to reduce fatalities, obviously within reason regarding space in an ambulance and the financial ability to aquire specialist equipment, but anything that can reduce the stress on A&E departments and reduce deaths should be implemented,
Currently I don't think the NHS do enough in researching and providing better ambulance care, whether that would have helped in this case is another question, and slightly irrelevant to the OP...
What do you actually think the level of care is like that the crews out on the ambulances provide? They've moved a long way on from the way they used to work, basically transporting sick and injured people to hospital as a taxi with flashy lights, to being able to diagnose and treat a variety of conditions pre hospital. As Helenia said, someone having a heart attack will have had a 12 lead ECG done in the back of the ambulance and be given appropriate medications as required by the crew, if there's changes on the ECG the patient will be taken to the nearest hospital with a cath lab where they can receive a primary angioplasty, which is the gold standard of treatment currently for this illness, they won't even go to A&E first. The only way of enhancing this would be as Etomidate has sarcastically commented, by putting a cath lab in the back of an ambulance. The issues with emergency care in the NHS are symptoms of much wider problems across the NHS and in the social care sector along with societal attitudes as to what constitutes an emergency these days.
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