Achieving an A/A* in A level Mathematics Watch

Arsenallllllllll
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Hi guyssssss,
I currently go to college 4 days a week and study AS and A2 Maths, my offers from Uni's all require A/A* in Maths as I intend to study Maths. I have 3 days off so a lot of time to devote to Maths. Sooooooo what can I do to achieve this grade? Is there any specific techniques? Worksheets/Past Papers? What order should I do them in? How many hours a day? A timetable? This grade is everything!!!

Maybe we could follow it and Beast the exams!
Share problems, etc......

Any advice would be fully appreciated.
Thanks, THE BEASTTTTTT
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Lucasium
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Once you understand the content, past papers are king apparently


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ComputerMaths97
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Write really extensive notes on EVERYTHING. Then every day, read them a few times then condense it down. Condense it down until you literally only have the absolute basics + essentials. Then, just make sure you pretty much know these off by heart. Wait a few weeks, whilst checking through the notes a few times. Then get back into stride and do every past paper (one every 1-2 days) Write notes on everything you got wrong. Everything. And repeat the condensing of these notes. Then leave it until closer to exams, and repeat this last section (past papers). By this point, for maths, you should pretty much know the whole spec inside out. BEST OF LUCK BTW!!
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Computer Geek
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What exam board do you do?
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Kevin De Bruyne
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There are loads of questions to practice in each textbook. After that, work on past papers. Find harder papers online if you've run out of ones from your exam board.
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anonwinner
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I just do past papers and practice questions all the time. I haven't made any notes like the guy above says to do, notes aren't really needed for maths.

I got an A at AS and aiming for A* at A2
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TeeEm
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(Original post by joe12345marc)
Write really extensive notes on EVERYTHING. Then every day, read them a few times then condense it down. Condense it down until you literally only have the absolute basics + essentials. Then, just make sure you pretty much know these off by heart. Wait a few weeks, whilst checking through the notes a few times. Then get back into stride and do every past paper (one every 1-2 days) Write notes on everything you got wrong. Everything. And repeat the condensing of these notes. Then leave it until closer to exams, and repeat this last section (past papers). By this point, for maths, you should pretty much know the whole spec inside out. BEST OF LUCK BTW!!

(Original post by anonwinner)
I just do past papers and practice questions all the time. I haven't made any notes like the guy above says to do, notes aren't really needed for maths.

I got an A at AS and aiming for A* at A2
I probably also agree about not needing notes for maths (for most students) but I have found from my experience that it does work for some students
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ComputerMaths97
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Lies. You do need notes. Just maybe not as many as anyone else. If anybody has ever not taken any notes whatsoever, written none at home and not written down anything to focus on and then got an A*, I commend you because you're lying. Notes make it so god damn easy that it removes the having to think and turns it into remembering which eventually becomes a natural and almost muscle memory-like action.
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RhymeAsylumForever
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(Original post by joe12345marc)
Lies. You do need notes. Just maybe not as many as anyone else. If anybody has ever not taken any notes whatsoever, written none at home and not written down anything to focus on and then got an A*, I commend you because you're lying. Notes make it so god damn easy that it removes the having to think and turns it into remembering which eventually becomes a natural and almost muscle memory-like action.
Of course you need notes but not revision notes? I practice by just doing questions from the book and then bang out all the past papers. Got an A at AS so must be doing something right.
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pryngles
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(Original post by anonwinner)
I just do past papers and practice questions all the time. I haven't made any notes like the guy above says to do, notes aren't really needed for maths.
seconded
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kira1
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(Original post by anonwinner)
I just do past papers and practice questions all the time. I haven't made any notes like the guy above says to do, notes aren't really needed for maths.

I got an A at AS and aiming for A* at A2
Did you ever struggle with maths ?
Am I too late ?
I'm doing as Maths and struggling so Maths I'm missing 6 hours of Maths on Saturday to go to UoB
My school is apparently behind so we have to go in on that Saturday and she's covering five chapters
What can I do and how
Do I have hope of getting a high A
Sorry for bombarding you with questions
I would really appreciate it if you can reply
Thank you
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ComputerMaths97
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(Original post by RhymeAsylumForever)
Of course you need notes but not revision notes? I practice by just doing questions from the book and then bang out all the past papers. Got an A at AS so must be doing something right.
I expect 100 UMS in Maths AS this year. Which is why I write revision notes. Because it makes it easier. Don't get why people shortcut stuff and risk doing less better.
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Arsenallllllllll
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(Original post by joe12345marc)
Write really extensive notes on EVERYTHING. Then every day, read them a few times then condense it down. Condense it down until you literally only have the absolute basics + essentials. Then, just make sure you pretty much know these off by heart. Wait a few weeks, whilst checking through the notes a few times. Then get back into stride and do every past paper (one every 1-2 days) Write notes on everything you got wrong. Everything. And repeat the condensing of these notes. Then leave it until closer to exams, and repeat this last section (past papers). By this point, for maths, you should pretty much know the whole spec inside out. BEST OF LUCK BTW!!
Thanksssss
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Arsenallllllllll
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(Original post by thahleel)
what exam board do you do?

edexcel core; s1;m1
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Cerdic
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  • Past paper.
  • Mark past paper.
  • See what you got wrong.
  • Look up how to do whatever it was via Youtube/ textbook/ whatever, perhaps do some practice questions.
  • Another past paper, make sure you got it right this time.
  • Repeat 5-10x for each module.
  • A*.


(If you're obsessive like me, you can check UMS constantly. This helps when you do a really hard past paper and you do rubbish on it. For extreme revision, do Solomon papers.
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Arsenallllllllll
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Solomons, etc anyone has an order?
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anonwinner
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(Original post by RhymeAsylumForever)
Of course you need notes but not revision notes? I practice by just doing questions from the book and then bang out all the past papers. Got an A at AS so must be doing something right.
Yes obviously you make notes e.g. when you are practicing different types of questions you are technically making notes but I pretty much never use these notes for revision.
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anonwinner
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(Original post by joe12345marc)
I expect 100 UMS in Maths AS this year. Which is why I write revision notes. Because it makes it easier. Don't get why people shortcut stuff and risk doing less better.
I am not shortcutting anything I just don't see the point in making revision notes for maths I don't think it would help at all. And bro if you get only 100 UMS you will get a U
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Hedgehog648
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(Original post by joe12345marc)
I expect 100 UMS in Maths AS this year. Which is why I write revision notes. Because it makes it easier. Don't get why people shortcut stuff and risk doing less better.
Revision notes aren't really the best use of time for a maths exam. It can help, but there are more efficient ways.

Past papers are always the best way forward - Cerdic's method is definitely the best way to go, because the muscle memory you talk about comes better from answering lots of questions than it does from writing and rereading lots of notes.
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pryngles
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(Original post by Cerdic)
  • Past paper.
  • Mark past paper.
  • See what you got wrong.
  • Look up how to do whatever it was via Youtube/ textbook/ whatever, perhaps do some practice questions.
  • Another past paper, make sure you got it right this time.
  • Repeat 5-10x for each module.
  • A*.


(If you're obsessive like me, you can check UMS constantly. This helps when you do a really hard past paper and you do rubbish on it. For extreme revision, do Solomon papers.
UMS obsession is the way.

(Original post by joe12345marc)
I expect 100 UMS in Maths AS this year. Which is why I write revision notes. Because it makes it easier. Don't get why people shortcut stuff and risk doing less better.
Different people revise in different ways. I did a bunch of past papers repeatedly, making sure I knew where I went wrong (what Cerdic said) and ended up with 297/300 last year, but then again you don't necessarily need to do past papers to get in the high-end of the 90's, but neither do you need to make notes, it completely depends on the individual. In my experience the past-paperers tend to do better than the noters, but each to their own.

---

My advice would be: do past papers, take notes, find out which is working better for you and stick with it. You'll be fine, just no slacking!! However, I would recommend skipping the open day and doing the maths instead. Open days are fairly regular throughout the year.
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