B745 - Unsolicited Communications Act 2015

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toronto353
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B745 - Unsolicited Communications Act 2015, TSR Government

Unsolicited Communications Act 2015
An Act to set out the rights of the people of the British Republic against unsolicited communications from businesses and charitable organisations, principally in the domain of people's homes.


BE IT ENACTED IN ACCORDANCE with the provisions of the Parliament Acts 1911 and 1949, and by the authority of the same, as follows:-

Definitions:

1. Businesses – for the purposes of this Act, businesses will be defined as the providers of goods and services in exchange for money.
2. Charitable organisations – for the purposes of this Act, charitable organisations will be defined as organisations wholly or in part reliant on voluntary charitable donations from the public.
3. Unsolicited communications – for the purposes of this Act, unsolicited communications will be defined as contact initiated by businesses and organisations, where there has been no direct request made to these businesses and organisations, by the person or household being contacted, for this contact to take place.

1: Door-to-door sales and charitable collections:

1. Businesses may not engage in door-to-door sales without the explicit request from a potential customer.
1.1 This includes utility providers making door-to-door pitches with the aim of encouraging potential customers to switch providers.
1.2 This includes charitable organisations requesting regular donations paid through direct debit.
1.2.1 An exception will be made for charitable organisations requesting a one-off cash donation when their funding is low, or with the purpose of offering relief in the event of a national or international crisis, up to a limit of once per year per organisation, per address,
1.2.1.1 in which event, no minimum donation may be requested or suggested.

2: Telephone sales and telephone requests for charitable donations:

2. Businesses may not initiate telephone contact without the explicit request from a potential customer.
2.1 This includes both land line and mobile phone calls.
2.2 This includes calls made from overseas call centres.
2.3 This includes calls made to existing customers with the intent of selling additional goods and services.
2.4 This includes charitable organisations asking for donations.
2.4.1 This includes charitable organisations requesting additional or increased donations.

3: Unsolicited mail:

3. Businesses may not send unsolicited mail, nor directly deliver unsolicited mail.
3.1 This includes mail sent to existing customers with the intent of selling additional goods and services.
3.2 This includes charitable organisations.
3.2.1 An exception will be made for charitable organisations requesting a donation when their funding is low, or with the purpose of offering relief in the event of a national or international crisis, or to fund a specified project, up to a limit of once per year per organisation, per address.
3.3 This includes charitable organisations requesting additional or increased donations.

4: Electronic communications:

4. Businesses may not send unsolicited electronic communications.
4.1 This includes any form of unsolicited electronic communications to any and all types of electronic devices.
4.2 This includes charitable organisations.

Fines and Penalties:

1. Any business or charitable organisation found to have engaged in unsolicited communications is subject to a fine of £100 per unsolicited communication, of which 50 percent is to be received by the recipient of the unsolicited communication, and 50 percent will go to the Treasury, except when,
1.1 the unsolicited communications have taken the form of a mass mail-out, electronically or otherwise, in which case a maximum penalty of £50,000 can be applied per mail-out campaign.
2. Should a business or charitable organisation have been found guilty of unsolicited communications, yet persist in the practice, any subsequent offenses will be subject to a fine of £1000 per unsolicited communication, of which 50 percent is to be received by the recipient of the unsolicited communication, and 50 percent will go to the Treasury, except when,
2.1 the unsolicited communications have taken the form of a mass mail-out, electronically or otherwise, in which case a maximum penalty of £100,000 can be applied per mail-out campaign.


Commencement, short title and extent:

1. This Act may be cited as the Unsolicited Communications Act 2015.
2. This bill shall extend to the British Republic; and
3. Shall come into force on the 1st of May 2016
NotesThis bill aims to bring an end to the vast majority of unsolicited communications. Unsolicited communications are not only a nuisance to many members of the public, they can also result in financial hardship for the elderly and for vulnerable members of the public when they are pressured into purchasing goods and services they do not need and cannot afford. Moreover, it will make it more difficult for those who set out to scam members of the public by impersonating the representatives of businesses and charitable organisations.

Some exceptions have been made for charitable organisations – charitable organisations may still request donations through the use of mail, up to a limit of once per year. They may also make door-to-door visits up to a limit of once per year, but if they opt to do so they may only request cash donations, with no minimum amount stated. This is to prevent them from pressuring people into signing up for regular donations that people may not be able to afford, and to prevent those of a criminal inclination from collecting people's personal information and bank details.

The time when this Act will come into force has been set to permit businesses and charitable organisations to make internal rearrangements.
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Aye!
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Aph
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Aye!!
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Airmed
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Aye!
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RayApparently
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Aye.
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adam9317
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Aye! One of the best bills I have seen from the government this term!
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username1524603
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Aye! I like the idea of this bill but think the administration of fining businesses per unsolicited contact and then sharing out the fine is complicated and costly.
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Rakas21
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Declaring an interest but section 2 would put me out of a part time job so 'Nay'.

Also for goodness sake, put the image thingy at the top. Professionalism!
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Saracen's Fez
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(Original post by Rakas21)
Declaring an interest but section 2 would put me out of a part time job so 'Nay'.
I suppose it would also put us out of a funny if fairly awful programme on BBC Three.
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Lady Comstock
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Nay! Bad for the free market. If you don't want someone selling you something when knocking on your door, just politely decline. You don't need to be protected by legislation.
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Kittiara
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(Original post by Lady Comstock)
Nay! Bad for the free market. If you don't want someone selling you something when knocking on your door, just politely decline. You don't need to be protected by legislation.
I disagree. It shouldn't be down to people to fend off constant approaches by business. We're more than consumers - we should have the right to some peace and quiet in our own homes. If people want a product or a service, they'll seek it out. It's down to business to offer good products and services at a price people are willing to pay for them. If they do that, they'll sell.
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PetrosAC
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Aye! Brilliant Bill
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Lady Comstock
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(Original post by Kittiara)
I disagree. It shouldn't be down to people to fend off constant approaches by business. We're more than consumers - we should have the right to some peace and quiet in our own homes. If people want a product or a service, they'll seek it out. It's down to business to offer good products and services at a price people are willing to pay for them. If they do that, they'll sell.
This is anti-business. A better law would be to make businesses put certain residences on a never-annoy-again list if they spur their solicitations.
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Kittiara
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(Original post by Nigel Farage MEP)
Aye! I like the idea of this bill but think the administration of fining businesses per unsolicited contact and then sharing out the fine is complicated and costly.
Thanks! That is a reasonable point. Hopefully businesses and organisations wouldn't break the law, though. But if it is considered to be too much of a problem, it can be easily amended.
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Kittiara
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(Original post by Lady Comstock)
This is anti-business. A better law would be to make businesses put certain residences on a never-annoy-again list if they spur their solicitations.
There are such measures, but they have failed. Don't call lists are broken through the use of overseas call centres. Signs are ignored. Requests to be removed from lists are ignored.

Also, business isn't everything. As said, people aren't just consumers. It's down to business to produce things and offer things that people want and need. If they do that, people will come to them.
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Aph
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(Original post by Rakas21)
Also for goodness sake, put the image thingy at the top. Professionalism!
Since the abolition of mrs Windsor from power we no longer recognise her seal and as such as a government are refusing to use it and are instead in tge process of making a 'seal of the office of the president' to put atop our bills.
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Rakas21
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(Original post by Aph)
Since the abolition of mrs Windsor from power we no longer recognise her seal and as such as a government are refusing to use it and are instead in tge process of making a 'seal of the office of the president' to put atop our bills.
Just stick a British flag on it.
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Aph
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(Original post by Rakas21)
Just stick a British flag on it.
That could be going to:ninja: you know the whole 'flags of the saints' in a secular country... How should you feel about a tricolour?
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(Original post by Rakas21)
Just stick a British flag on it.
I was thinking Britannia.
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RayApparently
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(Original post by Rakas21)
Also for goodness sake, put the image thingy at the top. Professionalism!
How do you not grimace at the sight of UKIP bills?
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